Disentangling the cause of a catastrophic population decline in a large marine mammal

first_imgConsiderable uncertainties often surround the causes of long-term changes in population abundance. One striking example is the precipitous decline of southern sea lions (SSL; Otaria flavescens) at the Falkland Islands, from 80 555 pups in the mid 1930s to just 5506 pups in 1965. Despite an increase in SSL abundance over the past two decades, the population has not recovered, with the number of pups born in 2014 (minimum 4443 pups) less than 6% of the 1930s estimate. The order-of-magnitude decline is primarily attributed to commercial sealing in Argentina. Here, we test this established paradigm and alternative hypotheses by assessing (1) commercial sealing at the Falkland Islands, (2) winter migration of SSL from the Falkland Islands to Argentina, (3) whether the number of SSL in Argentina could have sustained the reported level of exploitation, and (4) environmental change. The most parsimonious hypothesis explaining the SSL population decline was environmental change. Specifically, analysis of 160 years of winter sea surface temperatures revealed marked changes, including a period of warming between 1930 and 1950 that was consistent with the period of SSL decline. Sea surface temperature changes likely influenced the distribution or availability of SSL prey and impacted its population dynamics. We suggest that historical harvesting may not always be the “smoking gun” as is often purported. Rather, our conclusions support the growing evidence for bottom-up forcing on the abundance of species at lower trophic levels (e.g., plankton and fish) and resulting impacts on higher trophic levels across a broad range of ecosystems.last_img read more

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Yoeli Childs Named To Watch List For Karl Malone Award

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSPRINGFIELD, Mass.-After being named to the all-WCC preseason team Wednesday, Thursday, Brigham Young junior forward Yoeli Childs was named to the watch list for the Karl Malone award by the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.Childs, who amassed 17.8 points and 8.6 rebounds last season for the Cougars, is one of 20 players on the watch list throughout the country.The award, which dates back to 2010 and is named in honor of the former Louisiana Tech standout and 2-time NBA most valuable player and 2010 Hall of Famer Karl Malone, and is awarded to the top power forward in Division I men’s basketball.Childs, a native of South Jordan, Utah and product of Bingham High School, shot 54.1 percent from the field in 2017-18 and amassed 15 double-doubles.For his heroics, he was named to the NABC and USBWA All-District teams.By mid-February, this watch list will be pared to 10 candidates and the winner of this award will be presented by Wendy’s in Los Angeles Friday April 12 at the College Basketball Awards.Previous winners of this award include Arizona’s Deandre Ayton, Baylor’s Johnathan Motley, Iowa State’s Georges Niang and Louisville’s Montrezl Harrell.Other standouts on the watch list include Duke’s Zion Williamson, Indiana’s Juwan Morgan, Minnesota’s Jordan Murphy and South Dakota State’s Mike Daum. Tags: Deandre Ayton/Georges Niang/Johnathan Motley/Jordan Murphy/Juwan Morgan/Karl Malone Award/Mike Daum/Montrezl Harrell/Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame/WCC/Yoeli Childs/Zion Williamson October 19, 2018 /Sports News – Local Yoeli Childs Named To Watch List For Karl Malone Award Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Beijing Olympics unveils adorable panda mascot in a suit of ice for 2022 games

first_imgThe air is still buzzing with excitement following this evening’s #mascot launch in Shougang Park. Let us know what you think of #BingDwenDwen & #ShueyRhonRhon! #Beijing2022 pic.twitter.com/reO2uoEl4Y— Beijing 2022 (@Beijing2022) September 17, 2019The organizing committee also unveiled Shuey Rhon Rhon, a red paper lantern child that will be the mascot for the Paralympic Games. Nihao #BingDwenDwen! Let’s find out how this adorable panda #mascot came to life as we count down to #Beijing2022! pic.twitter.com/rfAMd9o0pm— Beijing 2022 (@Beijing2022) September 17, 2019While there’s still plenty of time for nations to prepare for the games, International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach said he expects the mascot launch “will generate even more interest in these Games, especially among young people.” FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBalkansCat/iStock(BEIJING) — Meet Bing Dwen Dwen, the adorable face of the 2022 Winter Olympic Games.The Beijing organizing committee shared a photo on Twitter of the black and white bear in a glistening suit of ice and wrote “this panda is ready to share the true spirit of the Olympics with the world.” Written by #ShueyRhonRhon is here to light the way to #Beijing2022. Watch below to find out more about this lovable lantern child! pic.twitter.com/PFi4hKU0dx— Beijing 2022 (@Beijing2022) September 17, 2019Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. “The launch of the mascot today will generate even more interest for these Games, especially among young people. What I can say already is that it will be a wonderful ambassador for China and the Olympic Winter Games Beijing 2022.” – IOC President Thomas Bach #Beijing2022 pic.twitter.com/oTYonu4HKB— IOC MEDIA (@iocmedia) September 17, 2019The mascot launch ceremony took place Monday evening at Shougang Park in Beijing, China. The 2022 Winter Olympics takes place Feb. 4 to 20. September 17, 2019 /Sports News – National Beijing Olympics unveils adorable panda mascot in a suit of ice for 2022 games Beau Lund Bing Dwen Dwen is the official #mascot of Olympic Winter Games #Beijing2022! With a suit of ice, a heart of gold and a love of all things winter sports, this panda is ready to share the true spirit of the #Olympics with the whole world. pic.twitter.com/TSalSny3q1— Beijing 2022 (@Beijing2022) September 17, 2019They also posted an animated short that shows the spunky bear’s magical origin story. Bing Dwen Dwen transforms his icy outer layer into ice skates, a snowboard and more, featuring the marquee sports of the winter games.last_img read more

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General Dynamics Electric Boat Wins NEMMI Contract (USA)

first_img View post tag: General General Dynamics Electric Boat Wins NEMMI Contract (USA) Industry news View post tag: Navy View post tag: News by topic Back to overview,Home naval-today General Dynamics Electric Boat Wins NEMMI Contract (USA) View post tag: Electric View post tag: usa Share this article View post tag: DYNAMICS View post tag: Defence January 15, 2014 View post tag: NEMMI View post tag: Naval View post tag: contract GENERAL DYNAMICS ELECTRIC BOATGeneral Dynamics Electric Boat Corp. (GDEB) signed an agreement with Naval Sea Systems Command for repair work on Groton-based submarines under the New England Maintenance Manpower Initiative (NEMMI).Within the USD 15 million deal, GDEB will provide NEMMI tasks in support of non-nuclear maintenance, modernization and repair of operational nuclear powered submarines, floating dry docks, support and service craft and plant equipment assigned to the Naval Submarine Support Facility, New London, Conn.The work will be performed in New London, Conn and is expected to be completed by December this year.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, January 15, 2014; Image: GDEB View post tag: wins View post tag: Boat View post tag: Defenselast_img read more

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New boss for Cornish pasty firm

first_imgWest Cornwall Pasty Company has appointed a new executive chairman.Chris Peck, formally chairman at bakery chain Cooplands for four years, will join the company, according to his online LinkedIn profile.Peck will replace Stuart Rose, non-executive director at Giraffe restaurants and formally managing director of The Body Shop, according to British Baker’s sister site, M&C Report.Last month, the bakery chain was removed from administration by investment fund Enact, saving more than 200 jobs after the £7.5m fund by the private equity house Endless agreed to buy 35 outlets and stores, together with the brand.At the time, Enact revealed it planned to invest “significant capital” in refreshing the brand, in product innovation and investment in the store estate, including the opening of new stores at strategic locations.Enact also said it was in advanced discussions to appoint an experienced executive chairman to the company to shape and execute the new strategy.last_img read more

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Rowing toward the Head of the Charles

first_img 9Following the race, family and friends await the team as they disembark and head into Weld. 8The eight rowers and the coxswain power through the Charles. 2Coxswain Jenny Wong ’15 adjusts the speaker playing pop music that energized the team during rowing drills. The heavyweight Radcliffe women’s crew team was training on the Charles River. It was early morning, rainy and cold, and the bumpy boat could prove a brutal ride to anyone not used to it. But for the women of Radcliffe, it was just another day.“Get out the shoulders to the power zone!” yelled head coach Liz O’Leary.“We train 16 to 20 hours a week” said Lauren Tracey ’16, who has been rowing since eighth grade. “We usually row in the morning and do weight training in the afternoon. We train every day. We only have Sundays off. It’s a big commitment, but I love it, my team and rowing.”Usually after the morning training, the young women share breakfast in the Eliot House dining room, catching up on homework or the latest gossip. Sofia Donnecke ’18 said that because of the training schedule, team members have to sleep early and eat plenty. She arrived in Cambridge from Canada three months ago, but has already made good friends on the crew.“I remind them of their goals a lot,” said Jenny Wong ’15, a coxswain. “Even though I’m not rowing, I’m just as much in the boats as everyone else. I’m like the in-boat coach, leading the boat and giving motivation.” As to her style of coaching, she said, “I would definitely say I’m the tough one. You have to be. Rowers, they want to be pushed, they want to accomplish the best they can. And when you’re really tired, your own brain makes all sorts of excuses for you. You need someone to make you stick to you guns.”In recent days the Radcliffe crews spent their practice preparing for the 50th annual Head of the Charles Regatta, held over the weekend.Before Sunday’s match, O’Leary set the challenge: “Championship 8, it’s an open event. We have the U.S national team that just won the gold metal. We are racing against them, so will we win? Probably not. There are several national teams. But it’s great, it’s so much fun, because we never have the chance to see how competitive we can be against national team boats.”O’Leary had several goals for the Radcliffe heavyweight women. “You look at the collegiate field; we hope to be one of the top collegiate teams among the 40 racing,” she said.Last Sunday at the Head of the Charles, the Radcliffe heavyweight crew, stroked by Elizabeth Fitzhenry ’15, completed the three-mile race in 16:59:69 ― good for eighth place in the women’s championship event. Another Radcliffe crew, stroked by Eliza Flint ’15, completed the race in 17:38:48, placing 23rd out of 34 teams. Radcliffe finished fifth among the U.S. collegiate squads.— Ann Wang 4The team’s final training session was on the Thursday before Sunday’s race. 7The women give it their all during the Head of the Charles. 3“Power in the belly!” bellows head coach Liz O’Leary. 6Isabella Benduski ’17 (left) and Eliza Flint ’15 carry their vessel to the water for the big race. 1Lauren Tracey ’16 works the rowing machine inside Weld Boathouse, where the Harvard women’s heavyweight crew team prepared for the Head of the Charles race. 5Following the final training, the team brings their hands together in unity. 10Elizabeth Fitzhenry ’15 and a teammate hug after the race. The team notched an eighth-place finish in the women’s championship event.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s administration, alumnae respond to ‘The Hunting Ground’

first_imgSaint Mary’s President Carol Ann Mooney will a host a students-only conversation about sexual assault Tuesday at 5 p.m. in Vander Vennet Theatre, in light of discussion surrounding the CNN documentary “The Hunting Ground.”Director of media relations Gwen O’Brien said Tuesday will be the best opportunity thus far for dialogue between administration and students. She said Mooney is committed to the topic of sexual assault and wants seniors to have a chance to discuss their concerns before graduating.“Carol doesn’t intend to leave this topic at the end of the semester,” O’Brien said. “This conversation will continue.”O’Brien said the conversation will involve only students, with the exception of Connie Adams, director of the Belles Against Violence Office. She said the discussion is necessary in order to make progress.“[Tuesday] is a time for students to have the opportunity to speak candidly with Carol without the media present, because it really is about the students,” she said.O’Brien said she hopes students will be honest with President Mooney because that is the best way for the conversation to be productive.Over the past several weeks, “The Hunting Ground” has sparked discussion and debate on both Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame’s campuses. The College screened the documentary April 9, which features Notre Dame as a school that ineffectively responds to sexual assault allegations, some against Saint Mary’s students. Mooney introduced the film, and from the audience during the panel, she addressed concerns that she had disregarded a student’s sexual assault complaint.A second panel discussion, run by students, April 20 covered a range of issues and proposed a list of recommendations for the Saint Mary’s administration on providing more support to victims of sexual assault.Alumnae, as well as students, have expressed concerns about the issue raised in the film. Through Care.org, 2013 graduate Jessica Lopez created an online petition. Lopez said the petition, which resembles the petition that arose from the April 20 panel discussion, has 301 signees, with a goal of 500.The petition seeks to grab the attention of Saint Mary’s administrators, specifically President Mooney. A section of the petition written to President Mooney reads, “as the first lay alumna president of Saint Mary’s College, you have the power to make a truly significant impact on the history of our college. You can encourage your fellow administrative officials to make sexual assault a priority issue to address.”Lopez said there are several reasons alumnae are signing the petition.“First, we love our school, we support its mission, and we want to hold it accountable for its actions,” she said. “Second, we support our students and advocate for their safety. Three, we have been impacted by sexual assault either personally or through a friend, and we don’t want the past to repeat itself.“We expect better outcomes for the current and future students of Saint Mary’s College.”Lopez said she saw “The Hunting Ground” on April 9 when it showed in Bloomington, Indiana. During her time at Saint Mary’s, Lopez was a history and humanistic studies double major with a minor in Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS), and she heard about the documentary on the GWS Facebook group.Lopez said she decided to draft the petition for alumnae because of her love for the College.“I think it is important that the voices of its students are not only heard, but that their requests are acted upon,” Lopez said. “Saint Mary’s is a community of strong, educated women who believe in their school’s ability to lead in this mission for change.”The main platform for advertising the petition is social media, Lopez said.“With our current access to social media, the relationship between student and alumnae has never been stronger,” she said. “I want the students to know that the alumnae are listening and support their cause for change.”The response to the petition has been exciting and speaks to the Saint Mary’s experience, Lopez said.“I am delighted with the response we have had from the alumnae so far,” she said. “It truly goes to show how tight the bonds of sisterhood are at Saint Mary’s. At times we have to be our own advocates, and this is that time.”Lopez said current students have been the guiding force behind drafting the alumnae petition.“Their passion and activism truly inspired me to hold myself accountable as an alumna and fulfill the pledge I made after graduating from Saint Mary’s, that is ‘to continue the mission of Saint Mary’s College by integrating the core values of learning, community, faith, spirituality and justice into my life beyond Saint Mary’s.’“The students are the greatest resource [and] our school, our administrators, can benefit from listening to their experiences.”Alumnae of the College are welcome to sign the petition at http://chn.ge/1GqKxLyTags: Alumnae, petition, President Mooney, saint mary’s, The Hunting Ground Erin Rice | The Observer last_img read more

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Time to Heal dinner explores sexual assault and relationship violence

first_imgSarah Olsen Community members participate in the Time to Heal dinner Wednesday. The dinner, hosted by the Gender Relations Center, aims to assist the victims and survivors of sexual assault and relationship violence.Gebhardt cited the 2016 campus climate survey indicating 14 percent of student respondents said they experienced non-consensual contact or non-consensual intercourse. She noted that fewer than 10 percent of women actually report instances of sexual assault.After Gebhardt’s introduction, a panel of four alumni shared their experiences with sexual assault. The panel consisted of Mariah McGrogan, class of 2011, Amanda Pena, class of 2015, Michael Nolan, class of 2015 and Deirdre Harrington, class of 2015.Nolan started the discussion and shared his story about domestic violence during his freshman year of college.“It’s really difficult to spot an abusive relationship especially when you’re in it,” Noland said. “In each moment it kind of felt like a surprise too like this wasn’t like him. I didn’t really understand the gravity of it until I became an SOS advocate for the Family Justice Center and I went through the training to help other victims of domestic violence.”Nolan said the cycle of violence consists of abuse, feelings of guilt on behalf of the perpetrator, excuses and rationalizations, normal behavior and then justification of the abuse. He said in order to break the cycle, a support system is necessary.“I relied heavily on my friends telling me this guy’s no good,” he said. “You guys can be that friend, that person that notices you’re friend is probably in a problematic relationship and let them know.”Pena said she became a GRC Fire Starter, a peer educator that assists in developing programs fostering dialogue on campus, after her best friend was raped and subsequently dropped out of school.“I lost my best friend and that was a really difficult day to not only see, but it was something that made me want to act in more ways,” Pena said.She said she grew up seeing a lot of domestic violence in her family with almost every woman in her life experiencing it.“Every woman I knew had a story,” she said. “I grew up honestly believing that any man at some point was going to rape or hurt me. I strongly believed that.”Pena said after her experience with sexual assault and rape she first coped with it by distancing herself from it. However, when she saw the prevalence of the issue in society, she realized she needed to be an advocate for victims.“After I was assaulted I just called my friend and he picked me up and he just said ‘What do you want to do?’” she said. “You can impact so many people in ways you don’t even know just by walking alongside them.”McGrogan told the audience they had already taken an important first step by coming to the dinner and taking an interest in sexual assault and violence prevention.“By taking that first step I know that I don’t need to tell you don’t sexually assault each other,” McGrogan said. “I know I don’t need to tell you guys to do these things because you innately understand these things are wrong. What I can tell you is what you can do to help someone who is experiencing them.”She said the most powerful thing one can do as a friend of someone who experiencse sexual assault or relationship violence is to help them regain their autonomy.“When you are a victim of sexual violence or relationship violence at the core what is happening to you … your decision-making process about who you love or who you want to be with has been taken away with you,” McGrogan said.McGrogan said she was a victim of sexual violence  and that it was a hard journey from that experience ten years ago to her place on the panel today. She said she attributes her healing to the people that supported her along the way.“Throughout all of that there have been multiple people who have stood by me who have said ‘I believe you. You don’t have to convince me.’ And that is the most powerful thing you can say,” she said. “Take it as a compliment that someone is looking at you in their darkest hour and saying ‘I want you to stand with me.’”McGrogan said she hopes that in the future there will be more progress in terms of sexual assault prevention and healing.“I hope that by the time another 10 years pass we will be even farther along the journey of addressing sexual assault on college campuses as we are now. Because as strange as it is to think because of all of the problems you guys are seeing it’s on every campus across the country and it is getting better.“Talk about it. Take steps like coming to events tonight. And just be there for one another.”Tags: Gender Relations Center, sexual assault, Violence prevention The Gender Relations Center hosted its annual “Time to Heal” dinner Wednesday night to acknowledge the effects of relationship violence. Christine Gebhardt, director of the center, said the event aims to embrace victims and survivors, as well as embolden the community to be a place of hope and healing.“It is hard even when you work in violence prevention everyday to acknowledge that violence is in our midst,” Gebhardt said. “And we can often rationalize that it doesn’t happen here within our communities. But we know that’s not the case.”last_img read more

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Former national ACLU president offers defense of free speech

first_imgEncouraging colleges and universities to defend free speech on their campuses, former national ACLU president Nadine Strossen spoke on her new book, “HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech” in a lecture Tuesday night in Jenkins-Nanovic Halls.Strossen opened by saying she believes free speech on college campuses is under threat. Institutions are becoming hostile toward visiting speakers, with incidents like the March 2017 campus protest at Middlebury College — where students shouted down a speech by conservative author Charles Murray — becoming more and more frequent, she said. Courtney Becker | The Observer Former national ACLU president Nadine Strossen spoke on her new book, “HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech” in a lecture. Strossen defended the idea of free speech combating hate in her talk.Society has grown too ready to label the open expression of unpopular or polarizing opinions as “hate speech,” Strossen said.“People use the ‘h’ word promiscuously to label and renounce and stigmatize any idea that they hate,” she said. “The classic way the term is used is to refer to speech that denigrates on the basis of who you are — people who are members of religious groups or racial or ethnic groups that have traditionally been marginalized and excluded. But we also are using that term more and more to completely denounce and ostracize people whose ideas we disagree with.”This tendency has changed how society views free speech in context of civil rights issues, she said.“The term ‘hate’ is used for policy ideas on the most important subjects — about race, about gender, about sexual orientation, immigration police — and it unfortunately has led to a great chilling of discussion, especially on campus,” she said.This trend has created a climate in which members of college communities feel unable to freely express their opinions, Strossen said.“There is a huge amount of self-censorship where faculty members, and students are reporting that there are entire subjects that they dare not speak about at all or dare not speak about candidly for fear of, as one of my friends put it, being called some kind of an ‘ist’ or some kind of an ‘obe,’” she said.Strossen said she chose to write her book to provide a defense of free speech in the face of this movement.“To the best of my examination of decades of evidence, now, of how hate speech laws have actually operated in other countries and how the absence of hate speech laws have operated in this country … I am more convinced than ever that well-intended as censorship is, it is at best, ineffective and at worst, counter-productive,” she said.Strossen said “viewpoint neutrality,” or the idea that the government “may never hinder speech speech solely because of its viewpoint,” is one of two main precepts of First Amendment law.“The Supreme Court has said that is the ‘bedrock principle,’” she said. “No matter how hated or hateful that viewpoint is, the way we respond to it is through our own ideas, not through suppression.”The second principle states speech ought to be protected unless it poses an immediate safety threat, Strossen said.“When you get beyond the content of the speech — its message, its idea, its viewpoint — and you look at the particular context … if that speech directly causes certain imminent, specific, serious harm — in other words, it causes an emergency that cannot be prevented in any other way than punishing the speech — then you can and should punish the speech,” she said.Strossen’s research found “non-censorial counter measures” — such as counter-speech — are a powerful way to combat hate speech, she said.“Non-censorial counter-measures … are even more effective than what I thought they would be,” she said. “My argument is based not only on free speech principles. … My argument is based on policy concerns and strategic concerns about what is actually effective not only for protecting individual liberty and democracy but also for bringing about equality and dignity.” Strossen called on individuals from both sides of the political aisle to push back against censorship, both on college campuses and beyond.“All of us should use every opportunity to preach not just to the choir and make common cause wherever we can, with whomever we can on issues where we agree,” she said.Tags: ACLU, Free speech, hate speech, Nadine Strossenlast_img read more

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Are you worth opening? What your email efforts say about your brand

first_imgEmail marketing is an important instrument in the getting the word out. A vital tool to inform and engage members. Using email is second nature, using it correctly is not. Email as part of the communications strategy is one of the most effective digital strategies.  The tricky part comes when deciding what to send and how often. The great part about email marketing, while its low on the tech scale, it’s high on returns and always evolving. Let’s look at some of the ways to increase engagement, open rates, inspire action and build your credit union’s brand.What to do and How Often?When reviewing your outbound marketing strategies, it can be a difficult task to decipher how many emails to send out each month. This really depends on your message and what you are looking to accomplish. Finding the “Sweet Spot” will be helped along by shortening the email length to 50-125 or less and adding attractive graphics. Email content is getting shorter; however, experts advise not to lose the conversational tone. When it comes to finding the right email message and frequency, here are some suggestions to follow: Become more strategic in your approach: Is content relevant to your audience?Adopt a behavioral and trigger-based marketing approach: Sending emails based on member interactions with your credit union across multiple channels, especially your auto buying platform and other lead generation tools.Email at least once a month for maintenance and always provide value. Additional emails throughout the month: Send to targeted recipients based on their needs, not yours.Providing ValueUnderstanding what members want and when they want it, has been helped along by data collected from other online activities. What are members responding to in your social media campaigns and through lead generation? Hon in on how they are responding to your posts and incentives. While keeping the message short in the email, provide a link for members to gain more insight into an offer. Before hitting the send button, ask yourself, is this relevant to the member? Is it useful? When a member subscribes to your email list, it means they trust you enough and don’t mind giving you part of their time and attention. Provide value as a means of repayment. Another way to gain greater understanding is to run a member survey or offer a webinar on a specific topic. This will help break down your email lists for future targeting, by interest.Getting ResponseWhat financial products do you want members to learn more about, based on their interests? Support recent data collection by implementing strategies on those findings. If for instance you are planning a campaign on auto financing, circle the wagons with social media and in branch messaging before sending out the email. Compose your email with a question: You may have noticed we really want to get you into that new car! It’s intriguing, and you’re not selling…you are opening up a dialogue. The goal is to provide a direct link to the credit union’s auto shopping center at the height of the member’s interest. Use lead generation tools built into your auto buying site to immediately engage the member with an email. This is a behavioral email strategy and makes your interactions very personal. One of the challenges is getting members from point “A” in the message, to point “B,” action, as quickly and effortlessly as possible.  Don’t forget to support point “B” with a call to action, such as an incentive to sweeten the pot, but don’t rely on this as your main message.Open Me!Email open rates are also an area of great angst for marketers, we get annoyed when our results come back or are elated, sometimes something in between. Open rates are also affected by the time of day the email is sent, if you caught the recipient when they are cleaning out their email inbox, they liked the subject line but didn’t click through, the small graphic pixel placed within the email didn’t register because the recipient has chosen to open without graphics, many mail programs let you read what the email is about without opening; all this impacts open rates. Measure instead, sales, calls and visitor metrics to your website that resulted in your email campaign planting a seed.Brand BuildingConsistency is your credit union’s goal when utilizing email marketing to build brand awareness. Your credit union’s vision and mission is the key to making this channel a success. Do not treat email marketing as a numbers game, keep the messages about the needs of the member. For instance, newsletters are a great way to build trust and deliver a message the member is interested in. Be consistent, if your newsletter comes out monthly every 30 days, on a Thursday, make sure you hit that mark. Subscribers are engaged and are in the habit of receiving information when promised. Consistency with your email efforts will reflect positively on your credit union’s brand of being a consistent supporter of your member’s needs.Keeping emails on target with messaging, value and consistency will make your efforts attractive to members. This will keep them informed and your emails will become worthy of being opened, read and reacted to. 52SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Eric Budzinski Eric Budzinski is the AVP of Marketing for GrooveCar, Inc. He joined the company in 2015 after building a successful foundation in small business sales and marketing.   Eric can be … Web: www.groovecarinc.com Detailslast_img read more

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