Uni ‘spends £108,000’ to recruit each additional low-income student

first_imgBrasenoseSt John’s Queen’s CollegeChrist Church HertfordKeble Corpus ChristiWadham WadhamWorcester MagdalenMansfield St Anne’sTrinity Christ ChurchPembroke New CollegeMerton St Catherine’sOriel Lady Margaret HallNew College Part of the blame for colleges’ sustained reliance on students from private schools is attributed to competition caused by the Norrington Table, which annually ranks colleges by final degree results.However, statistical analysis currently under way at the Oxford Student Union suggests no connection between the proportion of students from poorer postcodes and final exam scores. St Edmund HallSt Edmund Hall Students from low-income postcodes are not the only ones being targeted by outreach schemes. In addition, Oxford focuses on two other primary measures of disadvantage: the number of students from under-represented schools and the number of students from areas of low participation in higher education. The University also has targets for students with disabilities.Taking into account all three of the disadvantage metrics, while compensating for students who may fall under more than one indicator, Rusbridger calculates that Oxford formally aims to increase the total number of less advantaged students by 90 by 2019/20, just shy of the combined tally of Eton and Westminster students admitted in 2017/18 – 94.Professor Martin Williams, Pro Vice-Chancellor for Education at Oxford University, told Cherwell: “As Alan says, the University cares passionately about having a fair and accessible admissions system.“Our outreach spending has several purposes, including widening interest in higher education generally among children from primary age upwards. Presenting this spending simply as a cost per additional widening-participation student admitted to Oxford doesn’t reflect everything it achieves. For example, our work locally with IntoUniversity is dramatically improving entry to all universities among students from Oxford’s most deprived neighbourhoods.“We have a range of targets for improving access, with 40% of our UK undergraduates now coming from the groups we aim at through outreach. That said, and as Alan rightly points out, more needs to be done.“We will shortly be setting a further set of demanding targets to ensure Oxford education is open to talented students of all backgrounds. Alan’s article is a welcome contribution to the debate around this.“Our colleges are key to this and we welcome the commitment and innovation that colleges, including Alan’s, are showing on the vital question of diversifying our student intake.” MansfieldLady Margaret Hall ExeterHertford Colleges such as St John’s, Merton, and Balliol, place in the top ten in both tables.Warden of Wadham College, Ken Macdonald, is cited by Rusbridger as supporting contextualised admissions, which vary entry requirements according to students’ circumstances.Macdonald said: “We have to recognise that people in failing schools with difficult socio-economic backgrounds who get themselves in a position to make a competitive application have achieved something extraordinary.“I mean, someone who’s got an A and two Bs from a crap comprehensive in Hull is quite capable of being as clever, if not cleverer, than someone who got three A*s at Westminster… I think that’s just a kind of basic recognition that people still struggle with.”Rusbridger’s figures come after news of an Oxford graduate launching a nonprofit aimed at tackling the “structural inequalities” associated with both Oxford and Cambridge. Access Oxbridge hopes to connect 200 disadvantaged students seeking to apply to Oxbridge with current or former students at the two universities by the end of October. OrielSt Hilda’s BalliolBalliol St Peter’sQueen’s College University CollegeSt Anne’s SomervilleSomerville TrinityBrasenose Norrington table ranking% students from poorer postcodes St John’sUniversity College MertonJesus College KebleSt Catherine’s PembrokeSt Hugh’s St Hugh’sExeter LincolnMagdalen WorcesterLincoln Oxford University spends over £100,000 to recruit each additional student from a poorer background in its annual admissions, according to a recent analysis of Oxford’s access efforts.The figures, published by Lady Margaret Hall principal and former Guardian editor, Alan Rusbridger, reveal that Oxford’s “cost of acquisition” for each extra student from a low-income area since 2009 is £108,000.Between 2009 and 2016, Oxford admitted about ten extra students from areas defined as “financially stretched” or regions of “urban adversity” by the Office for Students, while spending at least £14m per year on efforts to improve access as required by higher education regulators.While some of the £14m is spent on bursaries for students already admitted, the £108,000 figure has been calculated by taking the amount spent on outreach activities and staff per year and then dividing it by the average number of extra students admitted each year.According to the University, about 20% of all UK postcodes fall into this disadvantaged category, while about 15% of students who meet minimum entry requirements for Oxford (three or more As at A levels) come from these areas.This means there is a national pool of about 5,000 low-income school-leavers qualified to come to Oxford every year; however, in 2015/16 only 220 ended up attending.By 2019/20, Oxford hopes to have 9.5% of its 2,600 UK undergraduate entries be low-income students, making for a total of 243 low-income students across the undergraduate student body – just 23 students up from the 220 considered baseline.Rusbridger writes: “Twenty three works out at less than one per college. To Oxford this is ‘challenging.’“For comparison, Winchester College (£40,000 fees) sent 24 students to Oxford – about one in three of its Year 13 cohort – in 2017; St Paul’s (£37,719) sends nearly 40.” Jesus CollegeSt Peter’s Source: Alan Rusbridger  St Hilda’sCorpus Christilast_img read more

Read More →

Proper Cornish sets up team for growth

first_imgProper Cornish Group is preparing for innovation growth by recruiting a new marketing director, sales director and NPD manager. Former Pasty Association chairman Mark Muncey has been made marketing director. He will drive awareness of the company’s Proper Cornish pasty brand, and its Furniss biscuits.Muncey told British Baker the move was to help set a new direction for the company. He said: “It’s all about growth and strengthening the team, we are focusing on innovation – especially with some exciting new product developments coming up.  “We have a fantastic opportunity to come out of the recession and innovate. We will be looking at working with new partners, especially with the introduction of new products.”David Jeffs has filled the group sales director role. His background includes work at Olives Et Al and Avilton Foods.Diana Lewis, who has worked at St Merryn Foods, has been named NPD manager.In January 2013, the Bodmin-based pasty company received £1.5m in investment, from the Business Catalyst Fund, to build a new bakery.last_img read more

Read More →

Trey Anastasio’s Ghosts Of The Forest Announce New York City Webcasts

first_imgTrey Anastasio‘s new project, Ghosts of the Forest, will offer up their first-ever webcasts this weekend, as the band takes on a two-night run at New York City’s United Palace Theatre on Friday and Saturday, April 12th and 13th.In addition to a number of additional new tracks debuted on Thursday at the tour opener in Portland, last week’s performances included all 9 songs set to be included on Ghosts of the Forest’s debut album, which officially arrives on April 12th.The new outfit is comprised of Anastasio, his Phish bandmate Jon Fishman (drums), his Trey Anastasio Band cohorts Tony Markellis (bass), Ray Paczkowski (keys), and Jennifer Hartswick (vocals), and relative newcomer Celisse Henderson (vocals), who joined Phish, Hartswick, and more for their 2016 Ziggy Stardust Halloween set.The upcoming two-night run will mark the final shows of Ghosts of the Forest’s inaugural east coast leg, followed by two performances in California. The band currently has no scheduled tour dates beyond this month.Both New York City shows will be webcast via LivePhish in 1080p HD and Standard Definition.Ghosts of the Forest’s tour continues tonight, Tuesday, April 9th, at Albany, NY’s Palace Theatre. For a list of Ghosts of the Forest’s upcoming tour dates, see below. For more information, head here.Trey Anastasio’s Ghosts of the Forest Tour Dates:APRIL9 – Albany, NY – Palace Theatre10 – Boston, MA – Orpheum12 – New York, NY – United Palace Theatre13 – New York, NY – United Palace Theatre19 – Los Angeles, CA – Greek Theatre20 – Berkeley, CA – Greek Theatre at UC BerkeleyView Tour Dateslast_img read more

Read More →

Faculty senate calls for sanctuary campus designation of Notre Dame

first_imgIn a special session held Monday evening, the Notre Dame faculty senate passed a resolution calling for University President Fr. John Jenkins to declare Notre Dame a sanctuary campus for undocumented students. American Studies professor Jason Ruiz, who was part of the group presenting the resolution, said the resolution was “asking for Fr. Jenkins to keep doing what he’s doing.”“Fr. Jenkins, I think, has taken a national leadership position in terms of supporting and admitting undocumented students,” Ruiz said. “A lot of us who are involved in sort of a larger movement to support undocumented students are really worried about what’s going to happen with the next presidential administration.” The resolution from the faculty senate joins two other documents — a resolution from the Notre Dame student senate and a petition signed by more than 4,300 students and faculty — calling for Fr. Jenkins to declare Notre Dame a sanctuary campus. “[Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] (DACA) … is a set of federal protections in place that Notre Dame benefits from, in terms of being open about admitting and giving financial aid to undocumented students,” Ruiz said. “President-elect [Donald] Trump has vowed to terminate DACA, so a lot of us who work on these issues politically [and] professionally are in a serious state of concern and crisis over what we see as the impact of the impending termination of DACA.”While Fr. Jenkins has not declared Notre Dame a sanctuary campus, Ruiz said University policies currently in place are emblematic of such a campus.“Personally, I’m more interested in the policies than the terminology [of a sanctuary campus],” Ruiz said. “However, I push for sanctuary because that term has a salience and a political meaning and — for people that are Catholic — a spiritual and traditional meaning for our school as a Catholic institution. “For me, I pushed sanctuary because it makes a lot of sense for Notre Dame to say we push for sanctuary for the undocumented. The policies, however, that Notre Dame has in place are great, and I’m proud that Fr. Jenkins is already enacting them, and I’m extremely pleased with the fact that [faculty] senate would support them.”American Studies professor and member of faculty senate Annie Coleman said the debate on the resolution was fruitful. “It seemed like the senators that were at the meeting were strongly, generally, in support of our students and supporting the general notions of human dignity and justice and freedom and civil rights that this sanctuary movement kind of resonates with,” Coleman said. “Mostly we talked about the specific provisions at the end of the resolution, and what was the best way we could word those to express the support of undocumented students that were at Notre Dame and future undocumented students.”Coleman said a major goal of the resolution was to craft something that represented the consensus of the faculty. “I wouldn’t call this a radical document,” Coleman said. “It’s not advocating the breaking of laws, but it is establishing philosophical basis for support of the rights of students in the Notre Dame community and consistent support, no matter what policy changes might happen down the line.”English and digital humanities librarian Daniel Johnson, who was partially responsible for drafting the resolution, said the authors “stressed transparency and worked hard to strike a balance, signaling support for vulnerable students — both broadly and by way of specific provisions — without flouting the law.”“In the end, I think the senate feels it has adopted a widely-supported resolution, which, far from defying the university or its administration, encourages the administration to continue developing positions it has already articulated,” Johnson said in an email. “The resolution, in all phases of development, was viewed as a document in alignment with Notre Dame’s principles and traditions.” Tags: DACA, Faculty Seante, Sanctuary campuslast_img read more

Read More →

Vermont Ranks 30th in Highway Study

first_imgVermont’s road and bridge conditions have been under fire for the past few years, however the Reason Foundation’s study may tell another story. The Reason Foundation has been conducting surveys on all state owned interstates and highways since 1984. This year Vermont ranked 30th up from 37th last year. The Reason Foundation ranks states based on categories including traffic fatalities, congestion, pavement condition, bridge condition, highway maintenance costs, and administrative costs.Despite recent budget problems, VTrans recently found out that it must cut $8 million from its budget, Vermont road conditions appear to be steadily improving. However a closer look reveals a little more. While Vermont ranks low for number of fatalities it ranks 40th in conditions of rural roads and 44th in deficient bridges. So though it appears some things are improving there is still quite a bit of work to be done.For more information about the entire study browse herelast_img read more

Read More →

Colombia’s Center for Strategic Security Studies Addresses Regional Threats

first_img Vice Adm. (Ret.) Ordoñez Rubio: One of the strategies that we have adopted to meet the 2026 goal of a consolidated, recognized center that is a reference in the region includes relationship building. In this vein, in the short life of the center, we have already had visits to the United States, we have been to Argentina, to Chile, this year we are scheduled to go to El Salvador we may be also be in Mexico… So the idea is to create these relationships that allow for academic mobility in the sense of having researchers come, and indeed they are coming, as we begin to send researchers out, as well. We have already participated in international events; we’re on our way. But that’s the idea, the exchange of researchers, the exchange of documents, the exchange of publications and, of course, later, we plan to offer longer courses, deeper courses to assist people here in Colombia who we can train for periods of one month or so, but that are much deeper than what we’ve done so far with the eight international seminars that have already been offered. Then we will be able to move on to the next stage, academically. Too much blather without saying anything important; let’s leave so much academia and doctorates behind and let’s see reality objectively and materially: they’re screwed!!! DIÁLOGO: What is the importance of the successful relationship with U.S. SOCSOUTH and other friendly nations in the region? We also have good cooperation agreements with other countries – in the Caribbean, for example, we have done very good work with the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and France, which all have interests in the Caribbean. There is good cooperation with all of them. This has been essential to achieving good results, especially against drug trafficking, which is perhaps the greatest issue we face. Vice Adm. (Ret.) Ordoñez Rubio: We have participants from 18 countries in this course, including Colombia, and the topic is extremely interesting because as its title implies – “From terrorist insurgency to transnational organized crime” – we cover all of the issues of convergence, of the experience that Central American countries have with the problem of gangs, and the same problems that we have in Colombia with criminal gangs. As a result, the subject is not only interesting but in some way focuses on how these phenomena are affecting societies, individuals, our communities, our children, and, as a result, public safety. Therefore, this is a very important issue and what is even more important is that it must be fought through collaboration and cooperation. No country can do this alone; cooperation is essential, and I think that these events allow you to create important links with people who right now have mid- or high-level positions in their governments, but later on will be more involved in the future of their countries. So it’s about creating these friendly and cooperative relations, this academic network that must come together through cooperation and collaboration among all countries against a problem that is common to all of us and that is affecting all of us. Vice Adm. (Ret.) Ordoñez Rubio: Yes, Colombia’s experience against the narcoterrorist groups of the past and present definitely endows us with a lot of expertise. We have been successful in controlling these problems in Colombia and all that experience adds up. The most interesting thing here is not just the fact that the country has done a good job of handling the internal cooperation between different state actors, but that it has also done so at the international level. Such is the case with the United States, where there has been cooperation and a very strong partnership, and with other countries we work with in the Caribbean, with whom we have this support and these collaborations. I believe that it is very enriching and allows us to now be able to address this issue. Diálogo attended the seminar and spoke with its director, Vice Admiral (Ret.) Luis Alberto Ordoñez Rubio, who retired after 37 years of service with the Colombian Navy and holds a Ph.D. in Education. Vice Adm. Ordoñez explained that CREES emerged as a regional initiative against threats to security in the hemisphere – both traditional threats and those that are evolving to stay relevant and achieve their nefarious goals. Vice Adm. (Ret.) Ordoñez Rubio: Based on its focus. The Colombian War College (ESDEGUE) has its center for studies, which is the Center for Strategic National Security and Defense Studies, but CREES has a different purpose. Its mission and aims are different. CREES is oriented towards the region. It is a center that deals much more with regional issues than those that are particular to Colombia. Vice Adm. (Ret.) Ordoñez Rubio: Based on our work with the support of the SOCSOUTH, we always welcome military and civilian students who are very involved in the field of regional security, which includes the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. We have 20 to 25 participants from these countries attending every event we do through CREES. And within Colombia, we invite think tanks, academia, universities, institutions of the Colombian state – Military, as well as police and civilian – all of whom are involved in security issues. CREES director Vice Admiral (Ret.) Luis Alberto Ordoñez Rubio: CREES was created as an initiative of the Ministry of Defense, in close coordination with Special Operations Command South (SOCSOUTH) and the U.S. Joint Special Operations University. The idea behind CREES is to achieve joint management of all of the security issues in the region, starting at the academic level, and addressing everything that has to do with the threats – both the new and the traditional threats that are evolving – and all subjects related to transnational crime. The idea is to achieve shared visions, to establish an academic network that will support the study of these issues. Finally, we want to generate confidence, support, and collaboration among all of the countries in the region that are being affected by these phenomena, because if we are unable to work together, these groups that are gaining so much strength could definitely cause us a lot of harm. On March 8-11th, the Center for Strategic Security Studies (CREES) at the Colombian War College in Bogotá, held an international seminar on the evolution of terrorist insurgencies into transnational organized crime. Attending the event, which was the eighth seminar held at the CREES facilities since it was established in 2014, were Military and civilian representatives from more than 18 countries, including academics, researchers and expert speakers on the issues of security, terrorism, and organized crime, as well as future security decision makers from the participating countries. DIÁLOGO: What is the importance of offering courses in conjunction with SOCSOUTH, such as the seminar on terrorism and organized crime that we are attending this week? Vice Adm. (Ret.) Ordoñez Rubio: The relationship with the United States has always been very important for Colombia. I believe that it is a two-way relationship in which we have always felt the support and the backing of the United States, while Colombia has also been a very important partner, as we can see in the results. DIÁLOGO: What type of students does CREES look to attract? Why? DIÁLOGO: What is the focus and purpose of the Center for Strategic Security Studies? CREES is important because in certain respects we are unique in what we do. While there are other similar centers, they have different approaches and different objectives. CREES has the specific aim of creating shared visions, collaborating and creating an academic network, which is very specific to CREES. Also, it is a center that has been created in Colombia, which has had many problems related to terrorism and insurgent groups. Given our many years of experience, it is fitting that it be created and generated from a country like ours right now, which has somehow managed to overcome many of these problems with the joint efforts of the Military, the police, and foreign support… all of this makes it a good time to be working with CREES. By Dialogo March 21, 2016 DIÁLOGO: Do you think Colombia could become a regional leader in the fight against terrorism, similar to its role in relation to drug trafficking? DIÁLOGO: What are your main challenges as the director of CREES? Vice Adm. (Ret.) Ordoñez Rubio: Being the director of the center has been a wonderful experience. I was active duty in the Colombian Navy for 37 years, but I have also pursued a career in academia. I earned a doctorate in education last year, which makes the work with the center very interesting. It is attractive work because at the academic level it is possible achieve everything we were discussing in the previous questions. The challenges are about consolidating the center. We have been up and running for a year and a half, but the center was also established with the particularity that while we were organizing ourselves we were already working on hosting events, doing research, writing papers and documents for our newsletter and the CREES magazine, which was launched last year. So the biggest challenge is to ensure that the strategic plan we have set through 2026 can be carried out as we have planned. The result will be a consolidated center, a center that is definitively a benchmark in the region and that accomplishes the task of unity, cooperation, and contribution to the future security of our nations, from Canada to Argentina and Chile, and including all of the Caribbean and Central America. With the strong support of the United States and the countries in the region, which have definitely been enthusiastic about the issue, I believe that we will succeed. DIÁLOGO: Besides having regional participation, are there also exchanges with teachers from other friendly nations who come to teach courses? DIÁLOGO: How did CREES come to exist as a separate entity from the War College (despite falling under its umbrella) and how was its curriculum created? What is the importance of having a center like CREES in the region? last_img read more

Read More →

Navigate feelings to be a better leader

first_imgBusiness and feelings do mix, says Andy Janning, CEO of NO NET Solutions, during a presentation at CUNA Management School in July.Pretending they don’t isn’t an effective leadership strategy.Some of Janning’s wisdom for navigating the two:Work-life balance is a myth. Your career and your life connect on a deep level.Be a great marketer for your colleagues. When you help others find their place, your’s will take care of itself.Everything starts with listening. Strive to understand, accept, be genuine, and have empathy.Conflict stinks, but is necessary. Effective conflict can put relationships back together. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

Read More →

PREMIUMLowering barriers: MRT Jakarta designates parking area for disabled users

first_imgTopics : The conveniences that most people take for granted are often unavailable to people with disabilities. Access to a parking lot, for example, can mean a lot, especially in a city where public facilities have not traditionally accommodated the needs of disabled residents.Retnowati Sibarani, 53, said it was hard for people in wheelchairs like her to travel the city. She said parking lots and public streets were often inaccessible. “The regular parking lots and some sidewalks are usually too steep, making it hard for the disabled to pass through,” she said. Retnowati expressed gratitude that city-owned MRT operator PT MRT Jakarta had officially designated a parking area for the specialized motorcycles used by disabled people at the Lebak Bulus MRT Station in South Jakarta on Thursday. She hoped it would inspire other stakeholders to provide more accessible fa… Facebook Log in with your social account Google LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Linkedin Forgot Password ? disabled people-with-disabilities MRT MRT-Jakarta public-facilitylast_img read more

Read More →

What unit oversupply? Buyer interest strong in Teneriffe

first_img156/53 Vernon Terrace Teneriffe Qld 4005. Picture: Realestate.com.auBRISBANE’S unit oversupply doesn’t seem to extend to its most expensive suburb – Teneriffe- where a loft went under contract before the “new” sign could be taken off the listing. 156/53 Vernon Terrace Teneriffe Qld 4005. Picture: Realestate.com.au 156/53 Vernon Terrace Teneriffe Qld 4005. Picture: Realestate.com.auSitting on the river, in a top floor apartment of the historic Woolstore in a suburb considered hipster heaven, the 156/53 Vernon Terrace, Teneriffe apartment was always going to attract attention. 156/53 Vernon Terrace Teneriffe Qld 4005. Picture: Realestate.com.au“I think it was just the fact that people just want something which is very unique. This was a New York loft style apartment,” he said. 156/53 Vernon Terrace Teneriffe Qld 4005. Picture: Realestate.com.au“It was eventually bought by a single guy who has a couple of houses in the southern suburbs. He was looking to get into the inner city and this was the perfect opportunity. He plans to renovate and move in.” 156/53 Vernon Terrace Teneriffe Qld 4005. Picture: Realestate.com.auAmong the features in the Mactaggarts Place complex was a riverfront swimming pool, barbecue and gazebo area with direct access to the river board walk. 156/53 Vernon Terrace Teneriffe Qld 4005. Picture: Realestate.com.auMore from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor9 hours agoAgent Simon Petrie of Ray White New Farm said in the end two buyers battled it out offer for offer until it finally went under contract for $515,000 – a building record by about $30,000.He had marketed the 94sq m loft style apartmentt as being in “the last remaining Woolstore building on the riverfront in Brisbane”.last_img read more

Read More →

‘Drunken’ man found dead

first_imgSalvador’s lifeless body was discovered at the bottom of a cliff around 11 a.m. on July 15, it added. Officers of the Talisay City police station have yet to rule out foul play in the incident./PN He was 51-year-old resident Jonathan Salvador, a police report showed. According to police investigators, Salvador has been drinking with his friends since July 13. BACOLOD City – A drunken man was found dead in Barangay San Fernando, Talisay City, Negros Occidental.last_img

Read More →