Ralph Lauren, Shvo Group feuding over Fifth Ave sublease

first_imgFrom left: Michael Shvo and Ralph Lauren with 711 Fifth Ave. (Getty, Shvo Organization)Who deserves to be on Fifth Avenue? That question is at the heart of a legal battle between Ralph Lauren and the landlord of its store on the shopping corridor.In 2017, Ralph Lauren shuttered the 28,300-square-foot store at 711 Fifth Avenue, but continued to pay roughly $27 million annually for the unoccupied space. To lessen its losses, the luxury retailer made an agreement with Spanish fast-fashion chain Mango to sublease the storefront for around just $5 million annually.But that agreement may never come to fruition. New York-based real estate investment firm Shvo Group, Bilgili Group, Deutsche Finance and the German pension fund BVK rejected the sublease on the grounds that Mango doesn’t meet the caliber of luxury tenant they envision for the property, according to Business Insider.Read moreRalph Lauren to sublease Fifth Ave. location for a fraction of the costManhattan retail rents hit new lowsNBA owes Moinian $7.5M in rent for Fifth Ave store Message* Full Name* If the sublease were accepted, it could set a dangerous precedent for low rents on the luxury street.“Landlords are loath to contribute to massively discounted market lease comparables,” Michael Glanzberg, a principal at the retail leasing and consulting firm Sinvin Real Estate, told the publication. “With broad vaccination around the corner, no owner wants to benchmark Covid rents.”Rents on Manhattan’s retail corridors have hit historic lows amid the pandemic. On Fifth Avenue, the average asking rent hit $271 per square foot, a 22 percent year-over-year decline.Shvo’s firm, along with partners including Bilgili Group and Deutsche Finance, purchased the Fifth Avenue building, also known as the Coca-Cola Building, in 2019 for $937 million.[BI] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Jones Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinkcenter_img Share via Shortlink Email Address* Tagsfifth avenueFifth Avenue RetailMichael Shvoralph laurenRetaillast_img read more

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The production ecology of benthic plants in Some Antarctic lakes: II. Laboratory physiology studies

first_img1) Laboratory experiments were carried out on the photosynthetic physiology of two algal communities and two species of aquatic moss from lakes on Signy Island (Antarctica). (2) Net rate of oxygen production by algal `felts’ was measured at very low irradiance (up to 1.5 W m-2) at 2⚬ C. A community based on the blue-green algae Tolypothrix and Plectonema (Sombre Lake) had a light compensation point of 0.17 W m-2, with maximum net rate of oxygen production per unit ash-free dry weight of c. 0.6 μg mg-1 h-1, and a high and variable rate of oxygen uptake in the dark (respiration), mean value 0.41 μg mg-1 mg-1. A second community, in which Phormidium spp. predominated (Changing Lake), had a compensation point of 0.09 W m-2, but a lower maximum net rate of oxygen production (c. 0.2 μg mg-1 h-1) and a low respiration rate (mean value 0.09 μg mg-1 h-1). (3) Two species of aquatic moss, Calliergon sarmentosum and Drepanocladus sp., had similar respiration rate per unit ash-free dry weight at normal lake temperature (up to 5⚬C)–c. 0.3 μg mg-1 h-1. Respiration rate increased linearly with temperature between 1.2 and 30⚬C, but more rapidly for Calliergon than for Drepanocladus. The light compensation point at 2⚬C of the two mosses differed markedly. Drepanocladus had a compensation point similar to the algal communities investigated (0.11 W m-2), but Calliergon, which generally occurs in shallower water, had a higher compensation point (0.64 W m-2). Increase in temperature in the range of irradiance used in the experiments (maximum 2.4 W m-2) caused the compensation point to shift to higher irradiance. The effect was more pronounced in Calliergon.last_img
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Description and quantification of field attack rates by predatory mites: An example using an electrophoresis method with a species of Antarctic mite

first_imgPolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent esterase staining provide an alternative to immunological methods for investigating the diet of microarthropods which cannot be observed directly. Attack rates in field populations of Antarctic microarthropods by the predator Gamasellus racovitzai were calculated by proportional and quantitative analyses of electrophoresis results. Results were quantified by transmission densitometry and a digestion curve for ingested prey esterases was defined. An exponential decay model of digestion, incorporating meal size, was used, and a method potentially enabling both the time since feeding and the composite meal size to be estimated for individual predators is described. These methods are applied to samples of predatory mites collected from the Antarctic Peninsula. Although estimated attack rates were low, about 0.1–0.3 prey per predator per day, they may be sufficient to cause severe local reduction in prey density.last_img read more

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Metabolic constraints on burst-swimming in the Antarctic teleost Notothenia neglecta

first_imgImmediate-energy-supply pathways were analysed during burst-swimming in white muscle of the Antarctic fish Notothenia neglecta, (collected during Austral summer 1984 near Signy Island, South Orkneys). Selected enzyme activities were determined, and tissue metabolites were measured, before and after 3 min of burst-work. The activity of glycolytic enzymes is very low compared to that in other fish, while the activities of creatine phosphokinase, adenylate kinase and AMPdeaminase are relatively high. Concentrations of metabolites associated with cellular energy status declined with exercise. At the same time, there was no change in the concentrations of most of the glycolytic metabolites measured (including glycogen, glucose and lactate), while [creatine phosphate] declined and [inosine monophosphate] increased. These observations were used to propose that the potential for ATP generation via creatine-phosphate hydrolysis is enhanced in N. neglecta, while glycolytic capacity is relatively reduced. This is an unusual pattern of ATP production and places severe constraints upon the behavior of the fish. While the capacity for very short-term, high-power-output swimming is increased, the capacity for medium-duration swimming is reduced. Ecological repercussions are discussed.last_img read more

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Bryozoan colonization of the marine isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus at Signy Island, Antarctica

first_imgSixty specimens of the giant marine isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus Eights, collected from Borge Bay, Signy Island, Antarctica were examined for epizoans. Ten species of cheilostomatid bryozoans were found on the isopods. The purpose of the study was to quantify the prevalence, intensity, abundance, and spatial distribution of the bryozoans on the isopods. The proportion of isopods colonized was 42%. The larger isopods had both significantly more epizoic bryozoan colonies and species. The greatest density of bryozoans was on the fused pleon and telson. There was no significant difference between the dorsal and ventral abundance of bryozoan colonies. The diversity of epizoic bryozoans on the isopods is higher than on other host organisms from more stable environments. This may be because of active selection by settling larvae. The frequency of local substrata being scoured by ice is high around Signy Island, so there may be a selective advantage in colonizing a motile host.last_img read more

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Structural variations in derivatives of the bacteriochlorophylls of Chlorobiaceae: impact of stratigraphic resolution on depth profiles as revealed by methanolysis

first_imgBacteriochlorophylls c and d, recovered from two sedimentary sequences, were converted to bacteriophaeophorbide methyl esters by methanolysis and analysed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation liquid chromatography-multi-stage mass spectrometry (APCI LC-MSn). The distributions in both settings, a moderately consolidated sediment from Kirisjes Pond, Antarctica, and in a finely laminated microbial mat from Les Salines de la Trinitat, Spain, show significant variations within a narrow depth interval. The overall bacteriophaeophorbide c to d ratios in the two sediments are different, as are the ratios of particular C-3(1) diastereoisomers, indicating distinct differences between the bacterial communities that contributed to each sediment. Furthermore, a shift towards more extensive alkylation in homologues within each sediment is consistent either with changing environmental conditions in the depositional environments, or development-related changes in the structure of the bacterial community, leading to increased competition for light or nutrients.last_img read more

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Role of squid in the Southern Ocean pelagic ecosystem and the possible consequences of climate change

first_imgSouthern Ocean squid are important predators and prey and are a potential fishery resource. Their future under climate change is analysed from predictions of change by 2100 and assessments of the effects on squid biology. There are ∼18 Antarctic species of squid. Young feed primarily on crustaceans and switch later to fishes. They are preyed on by odontocetes, seals and seabirds – which together consume ∼34×106 t yr−1 – and fish. As predators, squid are second to fish as biomass producers but recent evidence suggests predator consumption of squid needs to be reassessed. Fatty acid composition and stable nitrogen isotope ratios indicate some predators consume less squid in their diet than gut contents data suggest. Southern Ocean oceanography is unique in having circumpolar circulation and frontal systems and at high latitudes it is heavily influenced by sea ice. The Antarctic Peninsula is among the fastest warming regions worldwide but elsewhere the Southern Ocean is warming more slowly and the Ross Sea is probably cooling. Sea ice is receding in the Peninsula region and increasing elsewhere. Modelled predictions for 2100 suggest although the Southern Ocean will warm less than other oceans and sea ice will reduce. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current may shift slightly southwards with intensification of westerly winds but resolution of the models is insufficient to predict mesoscale change. Globally, pH of seawater has decreased by 0.1 units since the mid-1900s and is predicted to decrease by another 0.5 units by 2100. Impact on calcifying organisms will be high in the cold Southern Ocean where solubility of calcium carbonate is high. Predicted temperature increases are unlikely to have major effects on squid other than changes in distribution near the limits of their range; acidification may have greater impact. Small changes in large scale circulation are unlikely to affect squid but changes in mesoscale oceanography may have high impact. Change in sea ice extent may not have a direct effect but consequent ecosystem changes could have a major impact. Cephalopods are ecological opportunists adapted to exploit favourable environmental conditions. Given their potential to evolve fast, change in the Southern Ocean pelagic ecosystem might act in their favour.last_img read more

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Disentangling the cause of a catastrophic population decline in a large marine mammal

first_imgConsiderable uncertainties often surround the causes of long-term changes in population abundance. One striking example is the precipitous decline of southern sea lions (SSL; Otaria flavescens) at the Falkland Islands, from 80 555 pups in the mid 1930s to just 5506 pups in 1965. Despite an increase in SSL abundance over the past two decades, the population has not recovered, with the number of pups born in 2014 (minimum 4443 pups) less than 6% of the 1930s estimate. The order-of-magnitude decline is primarily attributed to commercial sealing in Argentina. Here, we test this established paradigm and alternative hypotheses by assessing (1) commercial sealing at the Falkland Islands, (2) winter migration of SSL from the Falkland Islands to Argentina, (3) whether the number of SSL in Argentina could have sustained the reported level of exploitation, and (4) environmental change. The most parsimonious hypothesis explaining the SSL population decline was environmental change. Specifically, analysis of 160 years of winter sea surface temperatures revealed marked changes, including a period of warming between 1930 and 1950 that was consistent with the period of SSL decline. Sea surface temperature changes likely influenced the distribution or availability of SSL prey and impacted its population dynamics. We suggest that historical harvesting may not always be the “smoking gun” as is often purported. Rather, our conclusions support the growing evidence for bottom-up forcing on the abundance of species at lower trophic levels (e.g., plankton and fish) and resulting impacts on higher trophic levels across a broad range of ecosystems.last_img read more

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Yoeli Childs Named To Watch List For Karl Malone Award

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSPRINGFIELD, Mass.-After being named to the all-WCC preseason team Wednesday, Thursday, Brigham Young junior forward Yoeli Childs was named to the watch list for the Karl Malone award by the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.Childs, who amassed 17.8 points and 8.6 rebounds last season for the Cougars, is one of 20 players on the watch list throughout the country.The award, which dates back to 2010 and is named in honor of the former Louisiana Tech standout and 2-time NBA most valuable player and 2010 Hall of Famer Karl Malone, and is awarded to the top power forward in Division I men’s basketball.Childs, a native of South Jordan, Utah and product of Bingham High School, shot 54.1 percent from the field in 2017-18 and amassed 15 double-doubles.For his heroics, he was named to the NABC and USBWA All-District teams.By mid-February, this watch list will be pared to 10 candidates and the winner of this award will be presented by Wendy’s in Los Angeles Friday April 12 at the College Basketball Awards.Previous winners of this award include Arizona’s Deandre Ayton, Baylor’s Johnathan Motley, Iowa State’s Georges Niang and Louisville’s Montrezl Harrell.Other standouts on the watch list include Duke’s Zion Williamson, Indiana’s Juwan Morgan, Minnesota’s Jordan Murphy and South Dakota State’s Mike Daum. Tags: Deandre Ayton/Georges Niang/Johnathan Motley/Jordan Murphy/Juwan Morgan/Karl Malone Award/Mike Daum/Montrezl Harrell/Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame/WCC/Yoeli Childs/Zion Williamson October 19, 2018 /Sports News – Local Yoeli Childs Named To Watch List For Karl Malone Award Brad Jameslast_img read more

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