Wrath of the regulator

first_imgWrath of the regulatorOn 1 Sep 2002 in Personnel Today Because of regulatory changes, the financial services sector has no choiceother than to adopt e-learning, says Wide Learning’s Jan Hagen.  But other sectors would do well to pay heedto such impetusOver the last few years there have been many predictions about the rocketdevelopment of the e-learning market. Every year there were plenty of reasonswhy this market was a bit slower in developing than expected, but next year itwould be massive. Why then did it not happen so quickly? Why then is it nowsuddenly taking off? There are some entirely logical answers here. Firstly, let’s consider the rapid growth that failed to materialise. This islargely due to the fact that it takes a lot of time to change an approach tolearning and while it is easy to sell the benefits of e-learning to management,it is not so easy to sell it to an end user. Added to this, much of thelearning was poorly designed. A lot of ‘learning’ companies sold managementfeatures rather than effective learning, ensuring a dismal learning experienceand so a cynical marketplace. Why then, you may ask, is e-learning top of the agenda in many financialservices firms right now? It now makes sense to buy into e-learning because aneed has emerged that is most effectively solved by an e-learning-basedsolution. The changed regulatory structure in the financial services sectorputs a difficult obligation on the industry. There is a need to quicklycommunicate the intricacies of a changed regulation to everyone within anorganisation, making sure that everybody understands what these changes meanfor them as individuals and generate reports on individual progress to satisfythe regulator. On top of that, there is a need to test a large section of staffon their actual competence to do their job. And when you have solved all of that, you have to do the same thing at leastevery two years. The only way of doing all this effectively – without bankruptingor seriously disrupting the work a company does to earn a living – is by usinga technology-based solution. As always, a product or an industry will benefit when there is a genuineneed for its products. Obviously, the same thing is happening as before. Againthere are companies who see this opportunity as a way of making some fast moneyand they jump in and quickly roll out some e-learning training. A few tips are:check their learning design strategy – how do they ensure learning outcomes aremet? Check their understanding of compliance and last, but certainly not least,check how they are going to assess the ongoing competence of your staff. Just afew courses may be enough right now, but certainly will not be sufficientwithin a few months’ time. Jan Hagen is director of e-learning sales at Wide Learning – www.widelearning.com Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Read More →

The production ecology of benthic plants in Some Antarctic lakes: II. Laboratory physiology studies

first_img1) Laboratory experiments were carried out on the photosynthetic physiology of two algal communities and two species of aquatic moss from lakes on Signy Island (Antarctica). (2) Net rate of oxygen production by algal `felts’ was measured at very low irradiance (up to 1.5 W m-2) at 2⚬ C. A community based on the blue-green algae Tolypothrix and Plectonema (Sombre Lake) had a light compensation point of 0.17 W m-2, with maximum net rate of oxygen production per unit ash-free dry weight of c. 0.6 μg mg-1 h-1, and a high and variable rate of oxygen uptake in the dark (respiration), mean value 0.41 μg mg-1 mg-1. A second community, in which Phormidium spp. predominated (Changing Lake), had a compensation point of 0.09 W m-2, but a lower maximum net rate of oxygen production (c. 0.2 μg mg-1 h-1) and a low respiration rate (mean value 0.09 μg mg-1 h-1). (3) Two species of aquatic moss, Calliergon sarmentosum and Drepanocladus sp., had similar respiration rate per unit ash-free dry weight at normal lake temperature (up to 5⚬C)–c. 0.3 μg mg-1 h-1. Respiration rate increased linearly with temperature between 1.2 and 30⚬C, but more rapidly for Calliergon than for Drepanocladus. The light compensation point at 2⚬C of the two mosses differed markedly. Drepanocladus had a compensation point similar to the algal communities investigated (0.11 W m-2), but Calliergon, which generally occurs in shallower water, had a higher compensation point (0.64 W m-2). Increase in temperature in the range of irradiance used in the experiments (maximum 2.4 W m-2) caused the compensation point to shift to higher irradiance. The effect was more pronounced in Calliergon.last_img
Read More →

Bryozoan colonization of the marine isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus at Signy Island, Antarctica

first_imgSixty specimens of the giant marine isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus Eights, collected from Borge Bay, Signy Island, Antarctica were examined for epizoans. Ten species of cheilostomatid bryozoans were found on the isopods. The purpose of the study was to quantify the prevalence, intensity, abundance, and spatial distribution of the bryozoans on the isopods. The proportion of isopods colonized was 42%. The larger isopods had both significantly more epizoic bryozoan colonies and species. The greatest density of bryozoans was on the fused pleon and telson. There was no significant difference between the dorsal and ventral abundance of bryozoan colonies. The diversity of epizoic bryozoans on the isopods is higher than on other host organisms from more stable environments. This may be because of active selection by settling larvae. The frequency of local substrata being scoured by ice is high around Signy Island, so there may be a selective advantage in colonizing a motile host.last_img read more

Read More →

Mayor’s Update – April 22

first_imgJay A. GillianMayor April 22, 2016 Dear Friends,I learned this week that the Army Corps of Engineers completed its beach replenishment work in Sea Isle City and is expected to return to Ocean City as early as Sunday. In 2015, Ocean City’s south end was fortunate to receive a massive dune and beach rebuilding project at no expense to local taxpayers. But much of the sand was swept away in October 2015 and January 2016 storms. Starting this weekend, the Army Corps will replace what was lost.Work will begin at 52nd Street and proceed southward to 59th Street. Then the pipeline will be lifted and work will move from 52nd Street to 37th Street. Work is tentatively (weather permitting) expected to be complete by May 30.My administration also has been in contact with Army Corps and state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) officials to see what it would take to get them to come back and rebuild beaches at the north end of Ocean City. There are many other projects across the state competing for the time and funding of the Army Corps. But I assure you that we will do everything in our power to urge them to do this work.These projects are vital to protecting property across the length of the island and will always receive my full support.Drainage, road and utility work is underway at many spots throughout the island, and I ask everybody to be patient as this work proceeds. In most cases, projects are designed to be complete by Memorial Day. But some work, such as in the drainage project between 14th Street and 16th Street, may continue into early June before knocking off for the summer. If any work is not completed, roads will be temporarily restored for the summer and work will be finished in the fall.Lastly, I’d like to thank and congratulate Capt. Gary Green and firefighter Bill Wasekanes, who received Professional Firefighters Association of New Jersey Valor Awards last week for saving the life of an unconscious man in a smoldering apartment building in February 2015. Ocean City’s public safety team members have always provided exceptional service to our community.Warm regards,last_img read more

Read More →

Food for thought

first_imgWhat can we learn about the Industrial Revolution from a 19th century recipe? What can we discern about culture from a 17th century banquet menu? What can a Reconstruction-era cookbook tell us about architecture? Quite a bit, actually.Seventeen scholars, academics, and foodies from across the globe gathered in the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for “Reading Historic Cookbooks: A Structured Approach,” a weeklong seminar designed to teach researchers and scholars how to discern valuable data from recipes, menus, and cookbooks.Led by Barbara Ketcham Wheaton, the honorary curator of the culinary collection at the Schlesinger Library, students spent last week examining British and American texts from three centuries and learning how to approach such texts systematically in order to discern information from various fields of study.“This kind of analysis is very helpful when trying to get information out of cookbooks,” said William Rubel, a writer and cook who focuses on traditional cooking methods. “This focuses one’s attention on the details, and the devil very often is in the details. The seminar helps us learn how to see between the lines to derive information from what’s implicitly said and also what’s missing.”During one morning session, a participant talked about a 17th century recipe that called for pushing food through a colander using an apple. A fellow scholar asked whether the recipe intended the cook to use a piece of fruit or a round object that might have been dubbed “an apple.” As debate ensued and doubt was expressed, a smile broke on Wheaton’s face.“I told you when we started that we would know less at the end of the week than we did at the beginning,” she said.Wheaton, a renowned culinary scholar, got the idea for the seminar while researching her book, “Savoring the Past: The French Kitchen and Table from 1300 to 1789,” which entailed reading cookbooks spanning that period.“I had to figure out for myself how to read them,” she said. “You cannot read three cookbooks and see how they’re different. You need to be systematic.”Wheaton distributed several cookbook readings for the week that span various centuries in Britain and America. At first, students are asked simply to look at the obvious: what is being cooked. By the end of the week, she challenges them to examine the language, ingredients, and tools used to discern how these books fit into the lives of people in their time and place.“The Closet of Sir Kenelme Digby,” written in 1669, gives hints of the introduction of science to the kitchen. A book from 1825 reveals the beginnings of temperance sentiments that would lead to Prohibition nearly a century later. And in a nod to industrialization, a “Mrs. Putnam’s” cookbook from the mid-19th century references brand-name, machine-made kettles and griddles.Wheaton began offering her seminar in the early ’90s, and has held it in Los Angeles, New York, and Toronto. This was the second time she has taught it at Radcliffe. In recent years, Wheaton said she has seen a proliferation of academics attending, as the field of culinary history has grown and scholars in other areas realize the value of cookbooks as a primary source for research.“Food is one of the basic life things that humans have used to make an identity for themselves,” she said. “Yes, we need it. But we have used it also to create a system of beliefs, nationality, and culture.”The course has long attracted “an interesting variety of people.” In addition to several scholars and authors, a number of food and book enthusiasts were present: Nach Waxman, who owns the noted culinary bookshop Kitchen Arts & Letters in New York; Suzi Sheffield, a restaurant owner from Columbia, S.C.; and Kathleen Wall, the colonial foodways culinarian at Plimoth Plantation.As participants discussed their readings, expertise emerged. One knew all about the virtues of glass butter churns over wooden ones (the wooden ones rot easily and can make butter spoil), while another chimed in on regional barbecue techniques, and another explained how pressure cookers changed the socioeconomic status of families in India by freeing women from the kitchen and allowing them to work.“You’re getting a bunch of like-minded people together in one space,” said Regina Sexton, an author who teaches at University College Cork in Ireland. “That’s invaluable in its own right.”A special treat for participants was when Wheaton brought out treasures from the Schlesinger Library vault. Home to 15,000 culinary works, the Schlesinger’s culinary collection is one of the largest and oldest of its type, attracting academics and researchers from around the world. Begun as a collection intended to document the domestic focus and contributions of women, it has expanded to become an international collection covering culinary history, the cooking professions, gastronomy, the history of domestic life and management, and the role of food in history and culture.Cookbooks, Wheaton explained, are somewhat harder to collect than other kinds of antiquarian works. Because they’re intended for frequent use, they’re kept in kitchens, not libraries, and are often soiled, written in, stained, and generally battered.“Here, we have a genuine, authentic 19th century splotch,” she told her class as she walked around with a tattered volume.Students exclaimed over a handwritten cookbook put together by a group of British women (as a precursor to the Junior League and church cookbooks that would become popular in the following centuries) and took photographs as Wheaton walked around with obscure volumes by the likes of Gervase Markham, Miss Leslie, and Richard Bradley.Back when she picked up her first old cookbook in the ’60s, Wheaton remembers being the only person she knew who was interested in such things.“Fifty years later, I’m still reading, still trying to make sense of them,” she said, as her cohorts chatted around her. “But I’m not alone anymore.”last_img read more

Read More →

Tony Winner Julie White Boards CBS Comedy Pilot

first_imgTony winner Julie White has landed a CBS comedy pilot, Save the Date. According to Deadline she will star opposite Gossip Girl and Buffy star Michelle Trachtenberg and Psych’s Maggie Lawson. White won her Tony for her performance in The Little Dog Laughed, and was most recently seen on the Main Stem when she took over from Sigourney Weaver in Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike. Other screen credits include the Matthew Perry-Laura Benanti sitcom Go On and she was also in all those little Transformers movies you might have heard of. White will play the role of Connie, who is mom to sisters Hillary (Trachtenberg) and Katie (Lawson). The recently single Katie has booked a wedding venue while drunk and now needs to find the right man in time.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

Read More →

Gov. Wolf: Pennsylvania Must Protect LGBTQ Citizens from Violence, Discrimination

first_imgGov. Wolf: Pennsylvania Must Protect LGBTQ Citizens from Violence, Discrimination Equality,  Government Reform,  Hate Crime,  National Issues,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Across the country, there has been an alarming trend of violence against LGBTQ citizens, especially trans women of color. Governor Tom Wolf and the Pennsylvania Commission on LGBTQ Affairs today reaffirmed its support for the LGBTQ community, denounced this violence and urged the approval of pending bills to provide LGBTQ citizens additional protections from hate crimes and ensure comprehensive, non-discrimination protections.“Despite the progress we have made towards equality, Pennsylvania remains glaringly behind our neighbors on equality and protections for LGBTQ citizens,” Governor Wolf said. “Now more than ever, we must ensure protections for LGBTQ citizens. The trend of violence against trans women of color is disturbing but this violence is not new and we’ve watched as it has escalated. We owe it to our citizens to provide them the protections that ensure their safety. We mourn the loss of Michelle ‘Tamika’ Washington, a black trans woman and longtime advocate for the transgender community, who was senselessly murdered on Sunday. Let us use this moment to make these long-overdue changes without further delay.”“We must not remain silent and we must never forget those that were lost to violence,” Todd Snovel, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Commission on LGBTQ Affairs, said. “We will never forget Tamika’s legacy of fighting for what is right, we will say her name, and we will not accept this violence as normal. Let us pledge our collective energy towards passing comprehensive, non-discrimination protections and expanding our hate crimes laws to protect our LGBTQ citizens from violence.” May 21, 2019center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Read More →

Two-level home close to Brisbane Airport makes this a great purchase

first_img37A Acacia Avenue, Northgate.Mr Johnston said the home would suit either a large family, dual occupants or an investor.“The Northgate area is still affordable for those wishing to purchase houses within 12km of a major Australian city, and with great public transport links and easy access to both Brisbane Airport and the M1 it is perfect for weekend coastal getaways,” Mr Johnston said.The home has a new kitchen, stone benchtops and new wood flooring. 37A Acacia Avenue, Northgate.Ron Wang is ready to sell his investment property.The six-bedroom, three-bathroom home is spread across two levels at 37A Acacia Ave, Northgate.Go Gecko – Inner North selling agent Victor Johnston said with dual-living and exceptional living spaces, the near-new home was ready to move into. 37A Acacia Avenue, Northgate.Mr Johnston said the owners moved out years ago to live in the catchment area for Brisbane State High School. “This is currently an investment property and is now surplus to their needs,” he said.“The property was originally highset and they have since enclosed the bottom of the property, adding three large bedrooms, a lounge and kitchenette, with council approvals.”More from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019Mr Wang said his favourite part of the home was the rear deck, which caught the morning sun and was perfect in the afternoon for sea breezes.He chose to buy in the Northgate area because it was close to his workplace. 37A Acacia Avenue, Northgate. 37A Acacia Avenue, Northgate.The NBN has been installed and there is a carport, and remote lockup garage with internal access.The property is 15 minutes to Brisbane Airport, and a 10-minute drive to Westfield Chermside.Schools and public transport are a stone’s throw away.last_img read more

Read More →

Friday people roundup

first_imgEuropean Private Equity and Venture Capital Association, Schroders, BNP Paribas Securities Services, KPMG, Convictions Asset ManagementEuropean Private Equity and Venture Capital Association (EVCA) – Anne Glover, chief executive and co-founder of Amadeus Capital Partners, has been appointed chairman at the EVCA. She succeeds George Anson of HarbourVest Partners.Schroders – Karine Szenberg has been appointed country head for France at Schroders, effective September 2014. She joins from JP Morgan Asset Management, where she was head of France for more than nine years.BNP Paribas Securities Services – Anne-Sofie Strandberg and Steve Payne have been appointed as business development managers for Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Norway. Strandberg joins from Citi, where she was head of securities and fund services for Sweden, based in Stockholm. Before then, she was head of relationship management for securities services at Swedbank. Payne was previously regional business manager for client development at BNP Paribas Securities Services in London and has now relocated to Stockholm. KPMG – Adam Davis has been appointed to the Insurance Solutions team. He joins from Metlife UK, where he was head of pricing and product development.Convictions Asset Management – Nicolas Duban has been appointed chief executive, with responsibility for the company’s development strategy. Philippe Delienne will continue to serve as president and be in charge of asset management activities.last_img read more

Read More →

See the stars from your own rooftop terrace

first_imgPlenty of level grassed areas for families of all ages.“We play footy in the front yard and cricket.“It’s certainly big enough for all those activities.” Two levels of living plus a rooftop terrace make this five bedroom house at 17 Alverna Close, Wynnum a standout property, and the pool which was named Australian Pool of the Year.“My daughter has a telescope, and she goes up there sometimes,’’ Colin Kruger said.“We sometimes have barbecues up there as well and it’s quite easy to get up there to the viewing area.“It is certainly big enough for a number of people up there and so easy to kick back in the afternoon.”Mr Kruger has lived in the Wynnum area all his life but now he is moving his family of four to the Sunshine Coast to see Moreton Island from a different angle.That means Sotheby’s Brisbane agent Joseph Lordi is taking this 10-year-old Wynnum house to auction on December 1. Bi-fold windows open the kitchen to the outdoors.There is usable garden space in the front and backyard on the 2045sq m block allowing the house to cater to the sporting needs of an eight-year-old boy and the ever-expanding personal space of a teenage daughter. The Japanese shoji screens between the ensuite and the master bedroom.Whitewashed pebbles are set into the bathroom wall.And the rooftop terrace has a surface of imitation grass.“There’s a Balinese-Thai feel,’’ he said.“It’s practical and functional as well.“Where the kitchen and lounge and outdoor pool area is, it’s so easy to open up those timber sliders and entertain.” The rooftop terrace at 17 Alverna Close is big enough to host a barbecue and private enough to escape with a good book.ON a clear day you can see from the sand hills on Moreton Island all the way to Wellington Point from the rooftop terrace of 17 Alverna Close, Wynnum.By night the view is celestial. The downstairs kitchen with access to the pool and alfresco areas.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020“We were trying to achieve a resort relaxed feel to the place, so we went on several holidays and got some ideas,’’ he said. Underneath the rooftop terrace is also a good spot to enjoy the bayside ambience.Warm timbers accentuate bedrooms and living areas.Japanese shoji screens open the ensuite bath to the master bedroom and bayside views.last_img read more

Read More →