Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust: up 85% in 2020. Here’s what I’m doing

first_img Enter Your Email Address Shares in Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust (LSE: SMT) have rallied since the beginning of the year and are trading at an all-time high. Investors who purchased Scottish Mortgage shares at the start of 2020 are sitting on very attractive gains.It is not hard to see why the investment trust has delivered stellar returns. As at 31st October 2020, Scottish Mortgage’s two largest holdings were Tesla and Amazon. Both stocks have performed well through the global pandemic.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…The £16bn investment trust is a portfolio of global stocks. Scottish Mortgage is predominately (83%) invested in public stocks with the remaining 17% in private companies. There is also a bias towards US companies through its investment in technology stocks. Management teamScottish Mortgage is jointly run by two fund managers, James Anderson and Tom Slater, who have built an impressive performance track record. Over the past five years, the investment trust has delivered a staggering return of 304% versus its benchmark, the FTSE All-World Index of 81% (as at 31st October 2020).Scottish Mortgage is the flagship investment trust of the asset manager, Baillie Gifford. Both Anderson and Slater are experienced investment professionals and have a long tenure with the fund house.Large holdingsAnderson and Slater are not afraid to take some big stock positions. The top 10 holdings account for 51% of the total portfolio value. The largest holding of Tesla at 11% makes me nervous. Tesla shares have had a stellar run and the inclusion of the company in the S&P 500 will be music to shareholders.While I am apprehensive about the large exposure to Tesla, I believe it would be somewhat silly for the fund managers to reduce their holding now. Here’s why.The decision to include Tesla in the S&P 500 means that all the passive funds which track the index will need to buy the shares in substantial quantities. This bulk buying means that Tesla’s share price is expected to continue to rise in the short term.The prudent pairAlthough Scottish Mortgage has a large position in Tesla, what gives me comfort is that the fund managers are prudent. Earlier this month Anderson and Slater took some profits by reducing their position in Amazon from 10% to 7% for a reason other than diversification purposes. They have backed the US internet giant for a decade and now question the stock’s ability to maintain its rapid share price growth. The investment decision was prompted by Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s founder and CEO selling one million shares and netting £2.3bn earlier this month. The pair have previously trimmed their exposure to Tesla but I would expect them to lock in further profits after the inclusion of the company in the S&P 500.My verdictI can’t deny Scottish Mortgage’s impressive performance. I like the investment trust but emphasise that investors must be aware of the fund managers’ large stock bets. With Scottish Mortgage I am buying the investment expertise of Anderson and Slater. As long as my portfolio is diversified, I would be comfortable buying it even at the current price. Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic…And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains.But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times.Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down…You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm.That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away. Image source: Getty Images. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. See all posts by Nadia Yaqub Nadia Yaqub | Friday, 27th November, 2020 | More on: SMT John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Nadia Yaqub has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.center_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust: up 85% in 2020. Here’s what I’m doinglast_img read more

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Fort Worth women’s march attendees emphasize the need to vote

first_imgFacebook Listen: Ball Don’t Lie: The Closer Linkedin Twitter Listen: Ball Don’t Lie: Clutch Factor Bernice Ogbondah Second annual Fortress Fest comes to the Fort this weekend printThe one-year anniversary of President Donald Trump’s inauguration began with a government shutdown and a worldwide women’s march.The march closest to TCU took place at the Tarrant County Courthouse on the cross section of East Weatherford Street and Commerce Street in downtown Fort Worth. The event lasted well over two hours with thousands of attendees of varying races, ages, sexes and creeds.A woman stands with a sign at the rally. (Photo by Paris Jones)Volunteers at the march helped people register to vote in the upcoming midterm elections.Among them was Sandra Price, who said she was hesitant to vote as a young adult.“I was in my early twenties before I voted because I didn’t know how and I didn’t know what to expect,” she said.Once Price learned how to vote, she cast her ballot at every opportunity, she said. In 2008, she and her daughter served as delegates to the democratic convention in Austin. A child holds a poster at the march. (Photo by Paris Jones)“It was so amazing. [I] got to teach my daughters about democracy and how it works.” Fort Worth resident Kiphani Allen said she was motivated to attend today’s rally because of the outcome of the 2016 election and the campaign process.“The entire election campaign was a game changer for me, just seeing where this country has fallen back in terms of race, in terms of women, in terms of politics,” she said.Allen said the U.S. is in an “awful space,” and she aims to vote in every local election. “I don’t care what we’re voting on,” she said. “It could be voting on a waterfall, and I’m gonna go vote, mostly because people died [so] I could. Women died [so] I could. So it’s necessary.” Other marchers echoed Allen’s sentiment about the division felt in the country.Fort Worth resident and first-time protester Tracy Kass said the president’s language isolates immigrants who come to the U.S. wanting what is best for their families. A protester holds a sign at the women’s march. (Photo by Paris Jones)“The rhetoric he puts out is very divisive and hateful,” she said. “It’s giving a platform where people aren’t even willing to talk to each other anymore and we don’t need that.” Kass pointed out the immigrant roots of the country and first lady Melania Trump. “This is a country that was brought together by immigrants,” she said. “[Trump’s] wife is an immigrant. So for him to flat out say racial and hateful things is wrong. We need to stand up, and he needs to go.”A citizen attends the rally. (Photo by Paris Jones)Returning marcher Tanya Wisnoski said she wants to see new elected officials and hopes for a bluer Texas after the midterm elections.“We’re Hispanic women who don’t like anything that’s going on in our country these days, or at least not much,” Wisnoski said. Many TCU students also attended the march.Jacob Portillo, a third-year student, said the messages portrayed at the march can be implemented on TCU’s campus. “I’m the treasurer of Spectrum, which is the LGBTQ organization on campus,” Portillo said. “So we just constantly do work to try and make things better for gay people and just people in general on campus,” he said. Third-year TCU student Gabriel Wallace said women’s rights are equally as important as men’s rights.  “If there’s any woman who’s not being treated equally, then we’re all not being treated equally,” he said. Wallace said he hopes the U.S. will become more inclusive of marginalized people. “I hope that we can make better strides to kind of cancel out the regression that our government has been trying to push, and to keep moving forward like we should be doing,” he said. –Katie Coleman and Paris Jones contributed to this report. Twitter ReddIt Bernice Ogbondahhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/bernice-ogbondah/ Review: Fortress Fest was a success ReddItcenter_img Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Linkedin Bernice Ogbondahhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/bernice-ogbondah/ Facebook Bernice Ogbondahhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/bernice-ogbondah/ Previous articleWomen’s basketball defeats Kansas, wins fourth straight gameNext articleFort Worth recognized for growing music scene Bernice Ogbondah RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Bernice Ogbondahhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/bernice-ogbondah/ + posts Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Bernice Ogbondah is a junior journalism major from Fort Worth, Texas. When she’s not reporting you can find her curating playlists or furiously retweeting foreign affairs, political pundits and anything social justice. Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature last_img read more

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Power failure: How a winter storm pushed Texas into crisis

first_img Twitter Local NewsBusinessStateUS News Twitter By Digital AIM Web Support – February 21, 2021 Pinterest Power failure: How a winter storm pushed Texas into crisis Pinterest Facebookcenter_img WhatsApp Previous articleBishop lifts George Washington over Rhode Island 78-70Next articleShockers solidifying shaky spot in NCAA Tournament field Digital AIM Web Support FILE – In this Feb. 18, 2021, file photo, demonstrators stand in front of U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz’s home demanding his resignation in Houston. Cruz has acknowledged that his family vacation to Mexico was “obviously a mistake” as he returned stateside following an uproar over his disappearance during a deadly winter storm. WhatsApp TAGS  Facebooklast_img read more

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Donegal got the least heat this summer!

first_imgHomepage BannerNews Donegal got the least heat this summer! WhatsApp Google+ News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Pinterest Pinterest The summer of 2018 was one of the hottest, driest and sunniest on record.New data from Met Eireann shows that some parts of the country recorded their highest temperatures in decades.June, July and August this year marked a turning point from recent summers with some of the hottest, driest and sunniest conditions recorded.In Donegal though, it was slighty different.The northern part of the country was cooler than the rest with lowest average seasonal temperatures were in Malin Head, where the mean temperature was 14.3C.Meanwhile Finner in Donegal was the only place in the country where the rainfall total was not below average across the season.Shannon Airport recorded the summers highest temperature at 32 degrees. Other stations such as Oak Park in Carlow and Markree in Sligo also seen their highest numbers in years.Over the three months, Cork Airport recorded it’s driest summer since 1962, while the Phoenix Park in Dublin only seen 38 percent of the average rainfall for the season. Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Harps come back to win in Waterford center_img By News Highland – September 6, 2018 WhatsApp Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Facebook Twitter DL Debate – 24/05/21 Twitter Facebook Previous articlePeople being invited to contribute to Donegal Policing PlanNext articleSt Eunan’s Minor Champions Again – Pauric Ryan and Eoin O’Boyle Reaction News Highland Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

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No active shooter at mall in Boca Raton, Florida, police say

first_imgiStock(BOCA RATON, Fla.) — There is no active shooter at the Town Center Mall in Boca Raton, Florida, according to police.Officers responded to the mall after receiving reports of a shots fired Sunday afternoon, according to a tweet by the Boca Raton Police Department.Police asked residents to avoid the area and shelter in place.A video posted to Twitter shows multiple police officers walking toward the mall as alarmed shoppers hurry toward the parking lot.Additional details were not immediately available. Swat Team going in for active shooter #bocaraton pic.twitter.com/bttJQsKLpA— Rachel Cohn (@umdontbejelly) October 13, 2019This is a breaking news story. Please check back for updates.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img

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Wrath of the regulator

first_imgWrath of the regulatorOn 1 Sep 2002 in Personnel Today Because of regulatory changes, the financial services sector has no choiceother than to adopt e-learning, says Wide Learning’s Jan Hagen.  But other sectors would do well to pay heedto such impetusOver the last few years there have been many predictions about the rocketdevelopment of the e-learning market. Every year there were plenty of reasonswhy this market was a bit slower in developing than expected, but next year itwould be massive. Why then did it not happen so quickly? Why then is it nowsuddenly taking off? There are some entirely logical answers here. Firstly, let’s consider the rapid growth that failed to materialise. This islargely due to the fact that it takes a lot of time to change an approach tolearning and while it is easy to sell the benefits of e-learning to management,it is not so easy to sell it to an end user. Added to this, much of thelearning was poorly designed. A lot of ‘learning’ companies sold managementfeatures rather than effective learning, ensuring a dismal learning experienceand so a cynical marketplace. Why then, you may ask, is e-learning top of the agenda in many financialservices firms right now? It now makes sense to buy into e-learning because aneed has emerged that is most effectively solved by an e-learning-basedsolution. The changed regulatory structure in the financial services sectorputs a difficult obligation on the industry. There is a need to quicklycommunicate the intricacies of a changed regulation to everyone within anorganisation, making sure that everybody understands what these changes meanfor them as individuals and generate reports on individual progress to satisfythe regulator. On top of that, there is a need to test a large section of staffon their actual competence to do their job. And when you have solved all of that, you have to do the same thing at leastevery two years. The only way of doing all this effectively – without bankruptingor seriously disrupting the work a company does to earn a living – is by usinga technology-based solution. As always, a product or an industry will benefit when there is a genuineneed for its products. Obviously, the same thing is happening as before. Againthere are companies who see this opportunity as a way of making some fast moneyand they jump in and quickly roll out some e-learning training. A few tips are:check their learning design strategy – how do they ensure learning outcomes aremet? Check their understanding of compliance and last, but certainly not least,check how they are going to assess the ongoing competence of your staff. Just afew courses may be enough right now, but certainly will not be sufficientwithin a few months’ time. Jan Hagen is director of e-learning sales at Wide Learning – www.widelearning.com Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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The production ecology of benthic plants in Some Antarctic lakes: II. Laboratory physiology studies

first_img1) Laboratory experiments were carried out on the photosynthetic physiology of two algal communities and two species of aquatic moss from lakes on Signy Island (Antarctica). (2) Net rate of oxygen production by algal `felts’ was measured at very low irradiance (up to 1.5 W m-2) at 2⚬ C. A community based on the blue-green algae Tolypothrix and Plectonema (Sombre Lake) had a light compensation point of 0.17 W m-2, with maximum net rate of oxygen production per unit ash-free dry weight of c. 0.6 μg mg-1 h-1, and a high and variable rate of oxygen uptake in the dark (respiration), mean value 0.41 μg mg-1 mg-1. A second community, in which Phormidium spp. predominated (Changing Lake), had a compensation point of 0.09 W m-2, but a lower maximum net rate of oxygen production (c. 0.2 μg mg-1 h-1) and a low respiration rate (mean value 0.09 μg mg-1 h-1). (3) Two species of aquatic moss, Calliergon sarmentosum and Drepanocladus sp., had similar respiration rate per unit ash-free dry weight at normal lake temperature (up to 5⚬C)–c. 0.3 μg mg-1 h-1. Respiration rate increased linearly with temperature between 1.2 and 30⚬C, but more rapidly for Calliergon than for Drepanocladus. The light compensation point at 2⚬C of the two mosses differed markedly. Drepanocladus had a compensation point similar to the algal communities investigated (0.11 W m-2), but Calliergon, which generally occurs in shallower water, had a higher compensation point (0.64 W m-2). Increase in temperature in the range of irradiance used in the experiments (maximum 2.4 W m-2) caused the compensation point to shift to higher irradiance. The effect was more pronounced in Calliergon.last_img
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Bryozoan colonization of the marine isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus at Signy Island, Antarctica

first_imgSixty specimens of the giant marine isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus Eights, collected from Borge Bay, Signy Island, Antarctica were examined for epizoans. Ten species of cheilostomatid bryozoans were found on the isopods. The purpose of the study was to quantify the prevalence, intensity, abundance, and spatial distribution of the bryozoans on the isopods. The proportion of isopods colonized was 42%. The larger isopods had both significantly more epizoic bryozoan colonies and species. The greatest density of bryozoans was on the fused pleon and telson. There was no significant difference between the dorsal and ventral abundance of bryozoan colonies. The diversity of epizoic bryozoans on the isopods is higher than on other host organisms from more stable environments. This may be because of active selection by settling larvae. The frequency of local substrata being scoured by ice is high around Signy Island, so there may be a selective advantage in colonizing a motile host.last_img read more

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Mayor’s Update – April 22

first_imgJay A. GillianMayor April 22, 2016 Dear Friends,I learned this week that the Army Corps of Engineers completed its beach replenishment work in Sea Isle City and is expected to return to Ocean City as early as Sunday. In 2015, Ocean City’s south end was fortunate to receive a massive dune and beach rebuilding project at no expense to local taxpayers. But much of the sand was swept away in October 2015 and January 2016 storms. Starting this weekend, the Army Corps will replace what was lost.Work will begin at 52nd Street and proceed southward to 59th Street. Then the pipeline will be lifted and work will move from 52nd Street to 37th Street. Work is tentatively (weather permitting) expected to be complete by May 30.My administration also has been in contact with Army Corps and state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) officials to see what it would take to get them to come back and rebuild beaches at the north end of Ocean City. There are many other projects across the state competing for the time and funding of the Army Corps. But I assure you that we will do everything in our power to urge them to do this work.These projects are vital to protecting property across the length of the island and will always receive my full support.Drainage, road and utility work is underway at many spots throughout the island, and I ask everybody to be patient as this work proceeds. In most cases, projects are designed to be complete by Memorial Day. But some work, such as in the drainage project between 14th Street and 16th Street, may continue into early June before knocking off for the summer. If any work is not completed, roads will be temporarily restored for the summer and work will be finished in the fall.Lastly, I’d like to thank and congratulate Capt. Gary Green and firefighter Bill Wasekanes, who received Professional Firefighters Association of New Jersey Valor Awards last week for saving the life of an unconscious man in a smoldering apartment building in February 2015. Ocean City’s public safety team members have always provided exceptional service to our community.Warm regards,last_img read more

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Food for thought

first_imgWhat can we learn about the Industrial Revolution from a 19th century recipe? What can we discern about culture from a 17th century banquet menu? What can a Reconstruction-era cookbook tell us about architecture? Quite a bit, actually.Seventeen scholars, academics, and foodies from across the globe gathered in the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for “Reading Historic Cookbooks: A Structured Approach,” a weeklong seminar designed to teach researchers and scholars how to discern valuable data from recipes, menus, and cookbooks.Led by Barbara Ketcham Wheaton, the honorary curator of the culinary collection at the Schlesinger Library, students spent last week examining British and American texts from three centuries and learning how to approach such texts systematically in order to discern information from various fields of study.“This kind of analysis is very helpful when trying to get information out of cookbooks,” said William Rubel, a writer and cook who focuses on traditional cooking methods. “This focuses one’s attention on the details, and the devil very often is in the details. The seminar helps us learn how to see between the lines to derive information from what’s implicitly said and also what’s missing.”During one morning session, a participant talked about a 17th century recipe that called for pushing food through a colander using an apple. A fellow scholar asked whether the recipe intended the cook to use a piece of fruit or a round object that might have been dubbed “an apple.” As debate ensued and doubt was expressed, a smile broke on Wheaton’s face.“I told you when we started that we would know less at the end of the week than we did at the beginning,” she said.Wheaton, a renowned culinary scholar, got the idea for the seminar while researching her book, “Savoring the Past: The French Kitchen and Table from 1300 to 1789,” which entailed reading cookbooks spanning that period.“I had to figure out for myself how to read them,” she said. “You cannot read three cookbooks and see how they’re different. You need to be systematic.”Wheaton distributed several cookbook readings for the week that span various centuries in Britain and America. At first, students are asked simply to look at the obvious: what is being cooked. By the end of the week, she challenges them to examine the language, ingredients, and tools used to discern how these books fit into the lives of people in their time and place.“The Closet of Sir Kenelme Digby,” written in 1669, gives hints of the introduction of science to the kitchen. A book from 1825 reveals the beginnings of temperance sentiments that would lead to Prohibition nearly a century later. And in a nod to industrialization, a “Mrs. Putnam’s” cookbook from the mid-19th century references brand-name, machine-made kettles and griddles.Wheaton began offering her seminar in the early ’90s, and has held it in Los Angeles, New York, and Toronto. This was the second time she has taught it at Radcliffe. In recent years, Wheaton said she has seen a proliferation of academics attending, as the field of culinary history has grown and scholars in other areas realize the value of cookbooks as a primary source for research.“Food is one of the basic life things that humans have used to make an identity for themselves,” she said. “Yes, we need it. But we have used it also to create a system of beliefs, nationality, and culture.”The course has long attracted “an interesting variety of people.” In addition to several scholars and authors, a number of food and book enthusiasts were present: Nach Waxman, who owns the noted culinary bookshop Kitchen Arts & Letters in New York; Suzi Sheffield, a restaurant owner from Columbia, S.C.; and Kathleen Wall, the colonial foodways culinarian at Plimoth Plantation.As participants discussed their readings, expertise emerged. One knew all about the virtues of glass butter churns over wooden ones (the wooden ones rot easily and can make butter spoil), while another chimed in on regional barbecue techniques, and another explained how pressure cookers changed the socioeconomic status of families in India by freeing women from the kitchen and allowing them to work.“You’re getting a bunch of like-minded people together in one space,” said Regina Sexton, an author who teaches at University College Cork in Ireland. “That’s invaluable in its own right.”A special treat for participants was when Wheaton brought out treasures from the Schlesinger Library vault. Home to 15,000 culinary works, the Schlesinger’s culinary collection is one of the largest and oldest of its type, attracting academics and researchers from around the world. Begun as a collection intended to document the domestic focus and contributions of women, it has expanded to become an international collection covering culinary history, the cooking professions, gastronomy, the history of domestic life and management, and the role of food in history and culture.Cookbooks, Wheaton explained, are somewhat harder to collect than other kinds of antiquarian works. Because they’re intended for frequent use, they’re kept in kitchens, not libraries, and are often soiled, written in, stained, and generally battered.“Here, we have a genuine, authentic 19th century splotch,” she told her class as she walked around with a tattered volume.Students exclaimed over a handwritten cookbook put together by a group of British women (as a precursor to the Junior League and church cookbooks that would become popular in the following centuries) and took photographs as Wheaton walked around with obscure volumes by the likes of Gervase Markham, Miss Leslie, and Richard Bradley.Back when she picked up her first old cookbook in the ’60s, Wheaton remembers being the only person she knew who was interested in such things.“Fifty years later, I’m still reading, still trying to make sense of them,” she said, as her cohorts chatted around her. “But I’m not alone anymore.”last_img read more

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