AI brings needed autonomy to unmanned spacecraft

first_img EdwardThirlwall says: 1 thought on “AI brings needed autonomy to unmanned spacecraft” Continue Reading Previous Cervoz 3D NAND SSD product line in 2019Next congatec shows next generation embedded vision computing at Japan IoT/M2M Expo Leave a Reply Cancel reply You must Register or Login to post a comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram “In times to come, we are bound to see that it becomes a norm for various technologies to gather forces in order to achieve one huge success. Without one or the other, an eventual result might not be able to be realized. It usually takes 2 or more processe Log in to Reply Spacecraft autonomy has been primarily a collection of logic-based algorithms designed to respond to a set of circumstances that can be defined (or at least bounded) a priori. This type of artificial intelligence (AI) has worked well when the inputs to the algorithms fall within the pre-defined mission scope, allowing the pre-built logic statements to generate the appropriate response ahead of time.Today’s increasingly ambitious mission requirements are demanding higher levels of autonomy and greater navigational precision from spacecraft, requiring more than logic-based AI. High-precision space navigation to small comets and asteroids; entry, descent and landing (EDL) on moons and planets; and, rendezvous and proximity operations (RPO) with both cooperative and uncooperative targets all need sensing and perception capabilities provided by vision-based systems. Traditionally the development of these technologies have fallen within the domain of the public sector, but today the private sector is participating actively by driving progress in vision-based technologies such as autonomous satellite servicing, lunar landing, and research in vision-based AI and machine learning. Editor’s Note: This article is part of an AspenCore Special Project that provides designers with a look at the technologies and design practices needed for creating space-worthy electronic designs. Despite the increasing popularity of vision-based sensing systems, developing them has traditionally been costly and resource intensive. The algorithms used to translate a raw image into data for vehicle control are developed by a niche group of engineers with specialized area expertise. Verification and validation of these algorithms can involve complex physical testbeds featuring robots moving on tracks toward physical scale models of approach targets such as spacecraft and asteroids. In some cases, the testbeds are even flown in orbit before the technology is deployed on its intended mission.Once the algorithms are developed and validated by test, implementation onto production hardware is complicated by the need to optimize the available on-board processing resources, which are often limited by the availability of computing hardware that can survive the hostile radiation environment of space. As part of this optimization, it is common for portions of the algorithms to be distributed between FPGAs and computer processors. This split though can increase both design complexity and the number of engineering specializations required. NASA’s Raven is an on-orbit testbed for developing vision-based sensing systems for relative navigation. It is shown here deployed on the International Space Station. (Image courtesy of NASA) However, change is brewing. The ongoing private space race, which is disrupting many space-related technologies, is also driving down the cost of developing relative navigation capabilities. Competitions like the Google Lunar XPRIZE have motivated new companies to develop extraterrestrial landing technology at substantially lower cost than was previously possible.How is this being accomplished? Companies are using higher-level languages such as MATLAB and Simulink for algorithm development. This approach enables their algorithm design engineers to focus on developing the high-level application rather than spending time reinventing lower-level image processing routines, which are now available off the shelf. These higher-level languages also enable rapid prototyping of candidate algorithms, which can be integrated with existing guidance, navigation, and controls models for early system-level validation. Using these languages with Model-Based Design also allows software and hardware development engineers to automatically generate code for embedded deployment on both processors and FPGAs, and create test benches for system verification. Image processing techniques such as segmentation can be done in MATLAB without reinventing established methods. (Space vehicle image courtesy of NASA) >> This article was originally published on our sister site, EDN: “AI and machine learning: Shaking up the space industry.” April 30, 2019 at 1:36 am last_img read more

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Doubts greet Macron letter to quell French yellow vest anger

first_imgPARIS — Yellow vest protesters and political rivals say a sweeping “letter to the French” from President Emmanuel Macron doesn’t go far enough to quell national anger at his policies.Macron’s letter explains how he’s addressing the movement’s concerns through a “grand debate” in local meetings around the country starting Tuesday. The debate will focus on taxes, public services, climate change and democracy.Yellow vest representative Jeremy Clement told BFM television Monday that the letter “settles part of the problem” but doesn’t go far enough to address sinking purchasing power.Protester Jerome Rodrigues told CNews television that Macron failed to recognize “the urgency” of concerns of low-income workers and retirees.Others criticized Macron for ruling out a restoration of France’s wealth tax. Opposition lawmakers also criticized the letter.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Together For LNG Campaign gives voice to supportive British Columbians

first_imgVANCOUVER, B.C. – The Together For LNG Campaign (T4LNG Campaign) will give a voice to the tens of thousands of British Columbians who share that LNG development in B.C. is the key to a good future for the province.The campaign demonstrates to the public and elected representatives that there’s a broad base of support for LNG projects amongst the citizens of B.C.A coalition of workers, First Nations, students, educators, businesses and others feel the LNG Project will offer economic and social benefits to First Nations, government revenues, education and other services, by providing well-paying jobs for British Columbians. “By unlocking our world-class energy asset, B.C.’s liquid natural gas (LNG) industry will play an important role in reducing global greenhouse gas emissions by helping many Asian countries transition off coal,” said Chris Gardner, President of the Independent Contractors and Businesses Association. “The strategic development of a strong LNG sector will also provide tens of thousands of jobs in construction, maintenance, and operations for people in B.C. and across Canada, and important revenue contributions to all levels of government.  LNG is the perfect opportunity for industry and government to work together to achieve great outcomes for Canada.”Paul de Jong, President of the Progressive Contractors Association of Canada, adds: “The liquid natural gas (LNG) that Canada has in such large supply is a key factor in worldwide demand for clean energy, strategic development of a strong LNG sector also provides for tens of thousands of construction, maintenance and operations jobs for Canadians, and provides robust contributions to provincial and national GDP. LNG in Canada is the perfect venue for industry and government to work together to achieve great outcomes,” de Jong says.T4LNG believes that the Campaign will build a community of interest to change the narrative around LNG. By working together, the public can let our elected leaders know there’s a broad base of support for LNG development. The coalition believes B.C. has the opportunity to help the world transition to a greener future, create prosperity at home and greatly reduce our global carbon footprint moving forward.Paul de Jong, President of the Progressive Contractors Association of Canada, adds; “The liquid natural gas (LNG) that Canada has in such large supply is a key factor in worldwide demand for clean energy.“LNG not only offers skilled workers the opportunity for employment while building the plant but also the opportunity for apprentices to learn the skillsets from their mentors. We will not only be building an LNG plant, but building career paths for hundreds if not thousands of young British Columbians who want to work in the construction industry,” says Tom Sigurdson, Executive Director of the B.C. Building Trades.“Blueberry River First Nation is a small community that plays a big role in LNG,” says Judy Desjarlais, President of Topnotch Oilfield Contracting and a member of the Blueberry River First Nation in northeast B.C. “All the communities in this area have signed off on it. A lot of us own businesses and a lot of us are benefiting from the work that’s happening in our backyard.”Ramona McDonald, President of Complete Safety Services in Fort St. John says LNG jobs will make a huge difference in the lives of First Nations peoples. “Probably 50 percent of my employees are of aboriginal descent. When they can go out and buy Christmas presents for their children because they’ve had a job and were able to make money, that brings me joy,” says McDonald. “We shouldn’t be in poverty, we shouldn’t see people suffering in this country, because we have what it takes to get everybody working again.”Dawson Creek Mayor Dale Bumstead framed the LNG conversation in terms of higher values. “Communities are built around quality of life, ‘health and happiness,” he said, “Health, education and economic opportunities are the pillars. We are a province built on resource development. It is the foundation for these pillars. We all need to support responsible resource development.”last_img read more

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BC Agricultural Critic visits Peace Region to hear farmers concerns

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – B.C. Agricultural Critic MLA Ian Paton joined local MLA Dan Davies on a two-day visit to tour the agricultural scene of the Peace Region.During Paton’s visit, they attended the B.C. Grain Producers’ Annual General Meeting, and a crop tour on Thursday, July 25, followed by a visit with local farmers on Friday, July 26.Being a farmer himself, Paton shares similar concerns with farmers when it comes to the Agricultural Land Commission; more specifically land rights. Paton feels that in order for the industry to thrive into the future, the Government needs to give farmers their land rights back in order for them to make the decisions as to what is best for their own land.According to Paton, the NDP Government has introduced a couple of bills that prevent farmers from making land decisions.“The NDP Government has brought two bills forward, last Fall Bill-52 and this was Spring Bill-15. What they’re doing is they’re giving way more control and power to the State, where the Agricultural Land Commission is now controlling what you can do on your farm, the size of house you can build on your farm. They’re starting to turn away the opportunities for farmers to have a second home on the farm… I’m a believer that if you want the next generation to take an active role in the farm, you’ve got to give the family members an opportunity to live on the farm.”Paton says Bill-15 has taken away the opportunity for landowners, within the Agricultural Land Reserve, to have the ability to go directly to the ALC to make an application to exclude land.Paton also suggests that Regional Panels need to be reintroduced in order to get an “on-the-ground” look at farming across the Province.last_img read more

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Group wants new agency to oversee oil and gas industry in British

first_img“A different set of rules” seems to apply for the fossil fuel industry, Parfitt said.To ensure compliance, the report recommends the creation of an arm’s length agency to oversee regulatory compliance and enforcement and that a single water authority be reinstated to regulate all water users in the province.“The amount of drilling and fracking that is going to occur to supply those plants is going to result in a huge, huge increase in gas industry activities in the northeast of the province,” Parfitt said.“So, this is a time that we need to get things right in terms of regulating the industry.”The report also says the provincial government should remove the commission’s powers to change regulations and compel it to release all information that is in the public interest.“At the end of the day, we still have to confront the fact that we still have a climate crisis in the world right now and we need to be finding a way to rapidly ramp down fossil fuel production in B.C. and around the world,” Parfitt said. The Canadian Press The report highlights examples of when the commission didn’t penalize companies to the fullest extent for the construction of unlicensed dams, leaking gas wells, contaminating water and violations of rules to protect endangered species, Parfitt said.Those examples show there is an extreme reluctance on the part of the industry regulator to hold the companies it regulates to account, he said.There will be a significant ramp up in oil and gas industry activities once liquefied natural gas plants are built on the B.C. coast, which will lead to an increase in drilling and fracking, Parfitt said.He said there’s been a reluctance on the part of one provincial government after another to deal with the Oil and Gas Commission. The commission and provincial government didn’t respond to requests for comment on the report released Wednesday by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.The centre is a think tank that does not take corporate donations. It describes itself as a source of progressive policy ideas and says its values are rooted in social justice and environmental sustainability.The report says that before the commission’s genesis, companies had to apply to numerous provincial ministries and branches to obtain authorizations before drilling for natural gas could begin.These included the Forests Ministry, which issued permits to log forests for roads, pipeline corridors, well pads and more; the Ministry of Lands, which approved the occupation of Crown or public lands; the Heritage Conservation Branch, which issued archaeological permits; and the Environment Ministry, which handed out water permits and approvals governing industrial activities in sensitive fish and wildlife habitats, it says.Parfitt said after the commission was established in 1998 the review and approval of industry development applications accelerated.“The very first reports showed the Oil and Gas Commission was speeding up the approval process but not the compliance process,” he said. “The report looks at three significant indications of where the agency has failed to be tough on the companies that it regulates.” VANCOUVER — British Columbia’s Oil and Gas Commission isn’t taking action that would protect the environment in the public interest, favouring instead the companies it is intended to police, says a new report.Author Ben Parfitt accused the Crown corporation of serving the interests of the industry and a provincial government that promotes fossil fuel development ahead of the public interest.“What we have seen over the more recent years is that the commission’s job to ensure environmental protection and to ensure public health and safety and to ensure companies are following the rules, there is abundant evidence that the commission is failing to do that,” he said in an interview.last_img read more

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Oppn in disarray Cong confident of winning all 13 seats in Punjab

first_imgChandigarh: The ruling Congress in Punjab is confident of winning all 13 Lok Sabha seats in the state as it faces a “faction-ridden” and “divided” Opposition in the hustings. Congress will be firing on all cylinders to take on the SAD-BJP alliance and AAP in the parliamentary polls beginning April 11. “We are seeing the opposition the way it is. Akali Dal has disintegrated and AAP has also broken into groups. BJP, within its cadres, has a lot of infighting,” said Asha Kumari, Congress Punjab affairs in-charge. Also Read – MP woman hangs herself after killing three children She exuded confidence that Congress will win all 13 seats in the state. To accomplish its ‘Mission 13’, Congress will highlight the achievements of its two-year regime and target the BJP-led Centre for its “failures” at the national level. Both Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) and Shiromani Akali Dal (SAD) will highlight the “non-performance” of the Punjab government on poll promises like farm debt waiver and smart phones for youths etc. It is going to be interesting to see how SAD fares in the elections in the backdrop of expulsion of Taksali (old guard) leaders Ranjit Singh Brahmpura, Rattan Singh Ajnala and Sewa Singh Sekhwan. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ The three floated SAD (Taksali) late last year. SAD president Badal has described the leaders as of “no consequence”. The resignation of senior leader Sukhdev Singh Dhindsa from party posts in September last year also did not augur well for SAD. It came at a time when the party was facing heat over sacrilege of religious scriptures and pardon granted to Dera Sacha Sauda chief in a blasphemy case. The SAD, which claims to be the “only custodian” of Sikh issues, has rejected the Ranjit Singh Commission report, which dealt with sacrilege incidents in Punjab. It also accused the Special Investigation Team, probing the 2015 sacrilege and police firing incidents, of implicating party leaders at the behest of Congress. The going is likely to be tough for AAP as well, which has grappled with infighting and factionalism in the state unit. It is going to be an uphill task for the party to retain the four Lok Sabha seats which it had won in the 2014 polls despite a Modi wave across the country. Senior leader Sukhpal Singh Khaira parted ways with AAP after he was ousted from the post of the leader of opposition. Khaira, along with seven other MLAs, had formed a parallel ad hoc political affairs committee and declared the party’s state unit “autonomous”, before resigning from AAP in January this year. He floated a new party — Punjabi Ekta Party (PEP). The Progressive Democratic Alliance (PDA) comprising PEP, Bahujan Samaj Party, Lok Insaaf Party, suspended AAP MP Dharamvira Gandhi-led Punjab Manch, CPI and Revolutionary Marxist Party of India (RMPI) is also in the fray. The PDA has announced seven candidates for the parliamentary elections. Besides AAP’s four seats, Congress had won three, SAD won four and BJP bagged two in 2014 Lok Sabha elections. However, in 2017 Gurdaspur bypoll, necessitated by the death of BJP MP Vinod Khanna, Congress candidate Sunil Jakhar won the seat. Polling will be held in Punjab in single phase on May 19 and results will be announced on May 23.last_img read more

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Climbing the success ladder

first_imgOver the last two-to-three decades, the major success story of the Indian economy has been the stellar growth of its IT industry. But as the dividends from the sector reach the eventual inflexion point, India needs to build similar competencies in other industries to ensure sustained growth and prosperity. It is not acknowledged as often but the biotechnology industry seemed poised to take over the mantle. In the span of a decade beginning in 2007, the industry has grown exponentially in size from about $2 billion to over $11 billion in terms of revenue. By 2025, it is targeted to touch $100 billion. Also Read – A special kind of bondThe biotechnology industry, however, has been impacting Indian lives long before it grew so much in size. Back in the mid-1960s, advancements in biotechnology drove the Green Revolution, which enhanced farm yields and made the country self-sufficient in food production. A similar contribution from the sector was witnessed in the White Revolution when India became a milk-surplus nation and improved the nutrition level of its citizens. More recently, the meteoric growth of the Indian pharmaceutical industry is a result of process innovation that has given the country a cost advantage in the manufacture of drugs. Further, the growing energy needs of India’s rural areas have been increasingly met by biomass fuel. Also Read – Insider threat managementThese outcomes have been the result of years of concerted efforts by the Indian government to enable the growth of the industry. As early as 1986, Rajiv Gandhi, recognising the potential of biotechnology in the country’s development, set up the Department of Biotechnology, making India one of the first countries in the world to have a government department solely dedicated to biotechnology. Over the years, the Department of Biotechnology has set up 17 Centres of Excellence at higher education institutions across the country and has supported the establishment of eight biotechnology parks across different cities. The biggest contribution of the department has been in setting up the Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council (BIRAC) in 2012, which has successfully supported 316 start-ups in its six years of existence. Due to these efforts, the Indian biotechnology industry has flourished over the years. As of 2016, India had over a thousand biotechnology start-ups. To put matters in perspective, Australia has a total of 470 biotechnology companies. More than half of these start-ups are involved in healthcare – drugs, medical devices and diagnostics – while about 14 per cent is in agricultural biotechnology and about 18 per cent in biotechnology services. The Indian economy also has a distinct advantage with respect to its demography that can ensure sustained growth for the sector. More than half the Indian population is below the age of 25. On a global scale, the median age in India (26.5 years) is much below that of China (35.9 years) and the US (37.1 years). Effective utilisation of this demographic advantage will provide India competitive edge over all other emerging economies in the advancement of biotechnological research and development. However, a few challenges need to be addressed if India is to fuel the growth of its biotechnology industry and achieve its target of making it a $100 billion industry by 2025. First, India’s research and development expenditure is quite low at 0.67 per cent of GDP, not only compared to mature biotechnology economies such as Japan and the US (which stands at around 3 per cent) but also in comparison to emerging economies like China (which is at around 2 per cent). Second, and more specifically to the biotech pharmaceutical sector, there are a few India-specific challenges with the country’s IP regime. There are two main areas of contention for the industry in India’s approach to intellectual property. The first issue lies in Section 3(d) of the Patents (Amendment) Act, 2005, which sets a higher standard for patentability than mandated by TRIPS. The industry argues that India’s stricter standards for patents discourage innovation and dampens foreign investment. The second issue is that of compulsory licensing, which gives the government power to suspend a patent in times of health emergencies. Although India has used this option only once, the industry feels that such regulations keep investors clear of Indian markets. A third challenge lies in the risk involved in the Valley of Death, that is, the risk of failure in the transition of innovative products and services from discovery to marketisation. Most of the early research funding, often provided by universities or the government, runs out before the marketisation phase, the funding for which is mostly provided by venture capitalists. It becomes difficult to attract further capital between these two stages because a developing technology may seem promising but it is often too early to validate its commercial potential. This gap has a huge impact on the commercialisation of innovative ideas. Thus, the Indian government needs to act on these challenges facing the biotechnology sector. An increase in investment towards research and development and building human capital is the most crucial point of action. These initiatives have shifted the growth trajectories of countries like China away from India. As for the challenging IP regime, the government needs to come together with the biopharma industry and chalk out a middle ground that recognises the value of innovation and does not hurt its investment attractiveness. Finally, for the Valley of Death concerns, the government can build a mechanism where funding can be provided to select innovative ideas based on their national importance. Only such action-oriented steps can make biotechnology the next success story of the Indian economy. (Amit Kapoor is chair, Institute for Competitiveness. Chirag Yadav, a senior researcher, has contributed to the article. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

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201516 NBA Preview The Hornets Coulda Been A Contender

Is Al Jefferson more like Carlos Boozer or Zach Randolph? Jefferson turned 30 last season and was a significantly less productive player than he’d been the year before. Randolph has turned his career back around in his 30s. Boozer, though, kept declining after turning 30. They’re both among Jefferson’s top comparables according to CARMELO. The Hornets need him to be much more like Randolph if they’re going to make the playoffs. Read more:All our NBA player projectionsAll our 2015-16 NBA Previews Nicolas Batum played a niche role in Portland’s offense. Now that he’s in Charlotte, can he adjust to bigger demands? His shots, points per minute and 3-point percentage declined in each of the last three seasons. He shot or turned over the ball on just one of seven possessions when he was on court last year. The Hornets will expect more of Batum. His defense, at least, is solid across the board — a must for replacing a stopper like Kidd-Gilchrist. After a mediocre rookie season, Cody Zeller improved markedly last year, shooting more effectively while turning the ball over less often. Can he keep it up? CARMELO says yes — sort of. He’s likely to remain at his sophomore-year level but not graduate to All-Star level. How he does will determine how much of an opportunity he has to improve — the roster is crowded with big men. The offense runs through Kemba Walker, but too often it stops with him: He takes and misses too many shots. His teammates last year didn’t give him many great alternatives; this year he should do better if the new Hornets give him better options. In the preseason, Walker has been clicking well with Lin, which at times means Walker shoots even more and passes less while Lin plays more like a point guard setting up his backcourt mate. Marvin Williams has done well to reinvent himself as primarily a 3-point shooter. His accuracy shooting over defenders from outside, coupled with his effective rebounding, made him a valuable player last year. CARMELO doesn’t expect that to last. Few of Williams’s closest comparable players avoided big declines in their 30s, and Williams is 29. We’re inaugurating our NBA player projection system, CARMELO, with 2015-16 season previews for every team in the league. Check out the teams we’ve already previewed here. Learn more about CARMELO here. Before Kidd-Gilchrist went down, Charlotte had taken steps to bolster its depth at just about every position but his small-forward spot. The Hornets signed guard Jeremy Lin and power forward/center Tyler Hansbrough, drafted Wisconsin center Frank Kaminsky at No. 9 in the first round and traded for power forward Spencer Hawes and shooting guards Jeremy Lamb and Nicolas Batum. Well, Batum really was more of a small forward for the Blazers, but he was going to move over to the No. 2 spot before Kidd-Gilchrist went down. Batum’s shift back to small forward leaves lots of room for young Hornets to move around the lineup and step up. CARMELO’s projections, though, call into question whether the healthy Hornets have enough talent to make the playoffs.Here’s what’s in store for the key Hornets in 2015-16 (and beyond): After the giddy rush of Linsanity, Jeremy Lin settled into a recurring role as a very standard, effective guard: For the Rockets and Lakers, he shot effectively, got to the free-throw line, handed out assists and stole the ball, but did little else on defense and turned the ball over too often. He’s expected to back up Walker but probably will play alongside him at times, as well. Jeremy Lamb disappointed in Oklahoma City. Will moving to a team with less talent free Lamb to play a bigger offensive role, or will he struggle even more with less help from teammates? CARMELO expects modest improvement for the 23-year-old, but not enough for a starting — let alone starring — role. Everything changed for the Hornets on Oct. 3. Before that day, Charlotte looked like a young, talented team on the rise, with lots of new players fighting for minutes. In a preseason game that night, though, forward Michael Kidd-Gilchrist injured his shoulder, requiring surgery that will likely keep him out for most of the season. Charlotte’s depth at small forward, and one of its best defensive players, vanished. With Kidd-Gilchrist, Charlotte looked like they could add a dozen wins to their total (33) last season, the team’s first rechristened as the Charlotte Hornets after New Orleans became the Pelicans. The new Hornets’ sophomore year won’t exactly be a slump, but Charlotte likely will struggle to reach .500 and make the playoffs. FiveThirtyEight’s CARMELO projects the Hornets to go 40-42: read more

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Middleton looks for a place in Gerrards starting XI

first_imgRangers Glenn Middleton had an amazing performance in Rangers friendly victory over Bury and reacting to questions from journalists he said he’s looking to push for a place in Steven Gerrard’s starting eleven.He said via STV:“I’ve enjoyed it so far but I’ve only played fifteen minutes of first-team football so far so it’s not much.“I need to keep building from there and show them what I can do in training each day.“If I get the opportunity in games I’ll just take it from there and show what I am capable of.Rangers is still behind Celtic: John Hartson Manuel R. Medina – September 3, 2019 According to the former Celtic player, there’s still a massive gap between his ex-club and Rangers in the Scottish Premier League.“It’s the same for all the young boys.“We all come into training every day showing what we can do and hopefully try to get our names on the team sheet as soon as possible.”He made his competitive debut for the club in the Europa League against FK Shkupi on 12 July 2018 in a 2-0 win for Rangers at Ibrox Stadium, with Middleton being widely praised for his performance on his debut.Despite being born in Northampton, England. Middleton has represented Scotland at several age levels up up to Scotland U21.last_img read more

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Goodbye 2018 Tight race for the Bundesliga top scorer title

first_imgBayern Munich’s Robert Lewandowski was the most lethal goalscorer last season in Germany, but this year he’s in fifth place so farIn the 2017-2018 season, Polish striker Robert Lewandowski won the German Bundesliga title as top scorer.He scored 29 goals in 34 matches, more than 14 goals ahead of second-place Nils Petersen from Freiburg.But now, he’s fifth on the list with only 10 goals.Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.This year Borussia Dortmund’s Francisco Alcacer has surprised everybody, scoring 12 goals for his club.He’s tied in first with Luka Jovic from Eintracht Frankfurt with 12.On third place, Dortmund’s Marco Reus and RB Leipzig Timo Werner have scored 11 goals each.Will the 2018-2019 see a new top goalscorer?last_img read more

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