DONEGAL IS ‘SWEET’ ON POTATOES!

first_imgNew research shows strong regional preferences when it comes to buying fruit and vegetables with Donegal consumers have a slightly unusual preference.Tesco carried out the surveyBananas top the charts in most counties, and berries, tomatoes, potatoes and oranges are also in the top five, according to a study by Tesco of the bestsellers in its stores nationwide.But Donegal has a longing for – sweet potatoes! The supermarket chain said it sells 70 million bananas a year, making them the number one seller, but fresh berries take the number one spot in Clare, Donegal, Galway, Kildare and Mayo.Dubliners appear to buy into food trends more than other counties, buying far more kale and avocado than elsewhere.And Donegal consumers are particularly keen on sweet potato, while Sligo natives buy a larger share of chillies and fDONEGAL IS ‘SWEET’ ON POTATOES! was last modified: March 27th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Birmingham boss explains his tactical changes

first_imgBirmingham boss Gary Rowett said starving Tom Cairney of space was the key to their victory at Fulham.Clayton Donaldson converted a penalty just after the break – having missed one in the first half – and the Whites’ Michael Madl was sent off as Birmingham won 1-0 at Craven Cottage.And Rowett explained how his tactical switch in midfield kept key Fulham player Cairney so quiet.“Cairney’s a good player and with [Denis] Odoi giving some real good width as a full-back, we knew we had to block that inside space,” Rowett said.“We changed [Robert] Tesche and [Maikel] Kieftenbeld over, so Maikel played Cairney’s side and we had a little bit more of a defensive mindset around the pockets Cairney wants to get in.“We felt perhaps [Chris] Martin might have started up front. With [Matt] Smith starting, we just felt as though we had an opportunity to play a little bit higher up the pitch, because he’s perhaps going to find it harder to run away from you.“We certainly didn’t want them high up the pitch, delivering balls into the box.“I was slightly surprised they took Smith off. I can understand why Slavisa did it – with 10 men you need real mobility on the pitch – but again it gave us the opportunity to play a little bit higher because they didn’t have any physical presence up there.“Also, Scotty Parker not playing perhaps made a difference to their balance defensively in the first half.”Rowett was pleased with his side’s performance but felt the game could have been wrapped up sooner.He said: “The only disappointment is that we made it a little bit harder than it needed to be. I thought first half we were excellent, it’s as well as we’ve played.“We made hard work of it at times in the second half, and perhaps needed to be a bit more clinical.”See also:Jokanovic accepts blame for Fulham defeatFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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What newest Warrior Jonas Jerebko is enjoying about the Bay Area

first_imgOAKLAND – The ritual has become as customary as his post-practice workout. Nearly every day, Warriors forward Jonas Jerebko will spend part of his morning Facetiming his friends from his native Sweden.That seems to be the best time to catch up given the nine-hour time difference between Sweden and the Bay Area. It also seems to be the best time for Jerebko to brag about the more warmer temperatures compared to back home. So often, Jerebko will Facetime his friends so they can see the …last_img

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Praise for rugby academy programme

first_img24 October 2013 Nine Academy players represented the Eastern Province under-19s this year which, after winning the Absa under-19 B competition, secured promotion to the A- division in 2014 after defeating Border in a promotion/relegation playoff. ‘A significant role’“There can be no doubt that the Kings Academy has played a significant role in the identification, development and retention of young up-and-coming players from the region,” said Crous. “The support and commitment from Saru, through their partnership with the Academy, has played an integral part in the successes achieved.” ChampionsIn their respective finals the EP under-21s – unbeaten in the league phase and knock-outs in 2013 – beat their Boland counterparts 59-19, while the EP under-19s defeated the Valke 56-40 in a high-scoring final. ‘A massive improvement’“The biggest positive impact the Academy made in the Boland, was the good performances by our under-19 and under-21 teams in their provincial competitions, with both qualifying for the playoff rounds and showing a massive improvement from 2012,” said Smal. “The performances of these teams this season is testament of the commitment and hard work that was done in those provinces, which are crucial in our identification and development of talented young players,” Saru CEO Jurie Roux said in a statement. “We’ve not only given them opportunities to play, but because our Academy is situated on the George campus of the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, the players also got the opportunity to study.” The CEO of Eastern Province Rugby, Charl Crous, said 19 of the 30 players currently enrolled at the Academy had played for the province’s under-U21 team, which narrowly missed out on being promoted to A-division after losing to Border in a playoff. SAinfo reporter and SA Rugby “We’re planning to increase this in the coming years as we aim to roll out the Saru Academy programme across all 14 provincial unions. We could already see in 2013 what a difference it made helping these players by improving the quality of their facilities and coaching, while we also focus on things like conditioning, injury treatment and rehabilitation, mentoring, nutrition, tertiary studies, life skills and good accommodation. Aim“Our aim is to ultimately help create a fully professional rugby player. In the long term, we’re aiming to produce 70 professional black players in the next four years, of which 25 will hopefully go on to play in Vodacom Super Rugby in five years’ time and by 2019, we’d like to see eight new black Springboks emerge from the Academy programme.” R18-million investedMervin Green, Saru’s general manager for development, said a total of R18-million was invested in equal portions across the four Academies this year. He also lauded Saru’s High Performance Mobi-Unit for the key role they played in ensuring the Academies had a good start in 2013.center_img “It was great to see so many players come through and gain valuable experience on the playing field,” said Prinsloo. South Western Districts CEO Johan Prinsloo lauded the programme and said 19 Academy players featured for the Eagles at under-19, under-21, Vodacom Cup and Absa Currie Cup level this year. The Academies are funded by the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund and are located in areas that traditionally have high numbers of black players. During the 2013, season, five out of the eight positions in the knock-out phases of the Absa Currie Cup under-21 B and under-19 B competitions were filled by teams featuring players from Saru’s Academy Programme. Eastern Province won the Absa under-21 B and under-19 B divisions after winning their finals in Nelspruit. Rassie Erasmus, Saru General Manager for High Performance, said: “The feedback we’ve received on the involvement of the Mobi-Unit has been very good. We worked with all four Academies at least twice this year and were very well received. It was also good to interact with the coaches there.” In the U19 B division, Boland and South Western Districts made it to the semi- finals before being eliminated from the competition. “Out of our group of 30 Academy players, a total of 28 played for our junior teams, while Ashley Esau played one Vodacom Cup match for the senior team and a couple of players also trained with our senior Absa Currie Cup team.” Willie Smal, the CEO of Boland, said the Saru Academy allowed his union to retain a lot of the young talent in the province and made a massive difference in Boland’s junior teams’ results this year. “It was superb to see how the Academies and the provinces co-operated this year, and I believe that is one of the many reasons why they were so successful. I’m confident we’ll see the positive effect at a higher level in the next couple of seasons.” “Our return on investment in the first year was massive and we really got off to a very positive start this year,” said Green. The South African Rugby Union (Saru) on Thursday declared the first season of operation of its four Saru Rugby Academies – established last year in Border, Eastern Province, South Western Districts and Boland – a success.last_img read more

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World champ Fanning wins J-Bay Open

first_img21 July 2014Reigning ASP world champion, Mick Fanning of Australia, took a giant step towards a fourth world title when he defeated compatriot Joel Parkinson in the final of the J- Bay Open in sensational waves at Supertubes in Jeffreys Bay, South Africa on the weekend.After a holding period, all the elements came together on Saturday to produce an epic finale in pumping 6-to-10 foot (2-3 metre) hollow waves.On fireFanning was on fire from the outset of the title-decider, seamlessly threading together powerful rail work and deep tubes in the double-overhead waves to rack up a 17.00 point total in the first half of the 45-minute encounter.Parkinson, the 2012 ASP world champion, and like Fanning a previous two-time winner at J-Bay, fought his way back into contention with rides of 7.43 and 6.17, but was still looking for 9.57 points from a final ride when time ran out.Dream final“I never dreamed that I would get to surf a J-Bay final with Joel (Parkinson),” Fanning said on the podium afterwards.“I’m so tired, but it’s a dream-come-true kind of day. I had a great start with that 9.00 ride, but there were still 40 minutes to go and anything could have happened.“Joel is one of my favourite surfers and my best friend. We’ve known each other since we were kids.“I’m so stoked, it was such an incredible day of waves and I’m just so thankful that I got to surf it. A big thanks to Cheron (Kraak), Koffie (Jacobs) and the ASP for bringing the event back to Jeffreys Bay.”The victory, Fanning’s second of the season after he won at Bells Beach in April, moved him up to number three on the ASP World Championship Tour (WCT) rankings behind Brazil’s Gabriel Medina and Parkinson.Parkinson was gracious in defeat and equally complimentary about the quality of the surf at Supertubes.‘An amazing heat’“It was an amazing heat and Mick is such a good tactician,” he said. “I made a couple of bad decisions, and I just didn’t get the right waves.“It would’ve been nice to get a win, but that was a brilliant day of surfing and it was so wonderful to be part of it. I feel like surfing won today. There was just so much good surfing and the waves were incredible.”Another Aussie, Matt Wilkinson was eliminated by Parkinson in the first semi-final after the eventual runner-up posted a an 8.83 and backed that up with a perfect 10-point ride to leave his giant-killing compatriot needing to replace both his scores.Wilkinson, who had previously dispatched 11-time ASP world champion Kelly Slater in round three and 2007 J-Bay winner Taj Burrow in the quarterfinals, fought back with a series of swooping turns on his backhand to earn a 9.77, but was ultimately still short of 9.07 points.‘So stoked’“I’m so stoked to have made it to the semi-finals,” Wilkinson said. “I came into this competition with almost no results so far this year, but I feel that I’ve improved in every heat. It feels really great to have so much support, especially for the goofy- footers, who have done so well at this event.”In the second semi-final, Owen Wright built on his victory over ASP world number one Gabriel Medina in their quarter-final encounter, to take an early lead over fellow Australian Fanning. However, the reigning world champion took control with rides of 7.17 and 8.0 before posting an excellent 9.00.Despite Wright earning a 7.23 to get out of a combination situation, he still needed a near-perfect 9.77 when the siren sounded.‘That really set me back’“I chose a couple of wrong waves at the start of the heat and that really set me back,” Wright said aftewards.“Mick was just clinical in his approach to the heat. I feel so privileged just to be here, competing at J-Bay. It has been by far the best event for me. I’m loving it.”ASP Heritage SeriesLegendary surfers Tom Curren of the USA and Mark Occhilupo of Australia took to the water in front of an enthralled crowd at Jeffreys Bay for the first nstalment of the ASP Heritage Series, which is designed to celebrate and honour the foundational contributors to the sport of surfing by showcasing rematches between iconic surfers.Curren, a three-time ASP world champion (1985, 1986, 1990) and Occhilupo, the 1999 ASP world champion and winner of the first ASP event in J-Bay in 1984, did battle in the epic conditions.With Curren posting a perfect 10, he put the Australian in a combination situation, and even though Occhilupo took a final long ride down point he was unable to post the excellent scores needed to take victory.‘ The waves were so good’“I got a little carried away during that 10 point wave. The waves were so good,” Curren said.“It’s Sonny’s [Miller, the renowned surf filmmaker who passed away earlier this week] birthday today, so I just want to dedicate this to him.“I love J-Bay, the waves are amazing and the people are wonderful. It’s so great to watch all the guys compete here in such good conditions.”‘That was sensational’“I had a blast out there. I think me and Tom put on a show,” Occhilupo said. “That was sensational. It was all about surfing J-Bay in all its perfection and putting on a great show for the crowd.“Tom ripped and it was also great fun. I think the ASP Heritage Series will really grow legs. I look forward to seeing other legends match up.”SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Age, Gender, Location: The Demographics of the Blogosphere

first_imgGenderThe blogosphere represents a very balanced gender distribution, with women accounting for about 51% of all posts and men accounting for 49%. LocationThe vast majority of bloggers still reside in the U.S. (29.2%), followed by Great Britain (6.75%), Japan (4.88%) and Brazil (4.19%). In the U.S., California plays host to the largest number of bloggers (14.1%), followed by New York (7.16%) and Colorado (5.25%).These numbers, of course, are skewed, as they don’t take the relative size of these countries and states into account. It would be interesting see these numbers on a blogger-per-capita scale. frederic lardinois Tags:#Blogging#Statistics#web Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts Ten years ago, most people were not aware of blogs and blogging. Today, however, blogging is a mainstream phenomenon. While it doesn’t get the same hype as Twitter and Facebook today, there are still millions of blogs and bloggers out there. Looking at almost 100 million blog posts in its database, social media monitoring and analytics firm Sysomos created a mini-census of today’s blogosphere. Specifically, Sysomos looked at the age, gender and location information attached to these posts.AgeThe average blogger today falls into the 21- to 35-year-old demographic. Indeed, this group accounts for a little bit more than half of all blog posts in the company’s database. Bloggers under the age of 20 account for about 20% of all posts, and bloggers between 36 and 50 account for another 20%. Bloggers over 51 only account for 7.1% of all posts. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

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Chris Pirillo On Building A Tech Brand, Entrepreneurship, Innovation

first_imgChris Pirillo is nearly 40 but could easily pass for 20 with his boyish looks, tech savvy, and the fact that he’s pretty much spent the last two decades indoors, in front of a computer screen. But in all that time eschewing a “normal” day job, and growing up, Pirillo has become a known face of geek culture. The Midwesterner turned Seattleite is the founder of the blog and online community Lockergnome.Last week, he teamed up with T-Mobile to be the face of its new ad campaign, in a move that acknowldeges his growing Internet celebrity.I spoke with Pirillo via phone to get his take on building a tech career and where he thinks the industry is headed. RW: You’ve been in this business for a long time (founding Lockergnome in 1996 and being online since 1992). How do you build  a tech brand and how do you stay relevant?Chris Pirillo: It’s easier and more challenging than I realized. I know it sounds kind of strange. As an independent publisher who’s bootstrapped, I do not have a full team at my disposal. So as odd as it sounds, I find myself incredibly challenged.It’s difficult to maintain velocity when you’re fighting for attention. So as the tools become easier and easier to use, and more well-funded and well-staffed organizations are able to crank things out quicker and in a more complete fashion, you have to be wiser about how you use your resources and where you spend the greater amount of time.I’ve done my best over the years to not just sign up for various [social media] accounts, but I’ve driven pretty hard to balance my reach between any one of the social media channels, from Twitter all the way to YouTube. And it takes time and attention away from other things but at the same time has provided a greater amount of longevity for the things that I’ve been doing. I don’t exist in any one space. RW: How many hours of the day are you online?CP: All. I don’t think there’s time that I’m not online. I’m always connected. Always. I’m always connected and that to me is not even an option anymore. Not just watching trends, but also developing and really fleshing through them. My primary vehicle is video. To stay ahead, you’ve always got to be connected. And that, to me, is as much entertaining as it is part of work.RW: What’s your work station like?CP: Well, my work station is nice enough that some people actually replicated it. Right down to the exact desk and light configuration. It’s clean, I can tell you that. It’s as clean as it possibly can be. Clutter tends to frustrate me. I learn to live with it, but I generally keep a clean work station. I’m surrounded by any given platform so whereas a lot of my computers are Mac, largely because of build quality, and the ability to run on Linux or Windows through them. In my work environment I try to keep it as balanced as I possibly can. If only because if I’m to provide perspective I have to have experience with things. My work environment reflects that balance. Course I have fun things around the office, too. I collect Darth Vader stuff, I’m an adult fan of Lego. I have so many unopened Lego sets … I can’t keep up.On Building A BrandRW: For someone who is trying to build a tech brand, what is your advice to entrepreneurs who want to do something along the lines of what you’ve done?CP: Every day is a challenge and it takes a lot of work. It doesn’t get any easier. If only because you’re facing increased competition for attention. And that I think is driven me almost to the point of madness. So, while it’s certainly a possibility for you to grow a tech brand, my primary suggestion is to really take stock at what you’re doing, what you want to do, and how you’re going to do it differently than everybody else. That may boil down to your personality and perspective. And the best medium to portray that personality and perspective, more often than not, is video. Video’s going to catapult you further than written content I feel, at this point and time. In that video if you say something that resonates and you present something that resonates with the audience it could drive your connection with them at a very deep level versus just reading words on a page. It’s not easy, it’s a flooded space. There are perspectives that one might be able to share. But, the way that you’re probably going to be standing out from the crowd is to be starting with video. The Internet is a fantastic platform for that. RW: How can small business owners and entrepreneurs carve out a career in the tech space?CP: I think more and more small business owners are going to be given an opportunity to do what they do better because of the advancement of technology. Technology is as much a part of the human condition as anything else at this point. I would say there’s a greater possibility for you to be yourself and carve out a career being yourself. And for small business owners it means lowering costs instead of increasing them. Meanwhile lowering frustrations at the same time. RW: Where do you think the industry is going? There’s so much with social gaming and social video, there’s so many avenues, what do you feel like is a big trend that’s a little bit below the radar?CP: I think the way the Internet is going, I think I’ve always played into it. I think it’s going to be more displayed. I think realistically, the cult of personality is a very strong driver for attention. And the more you are yourself and the more you put yourself out there, I think that adds a deep level of legitimacy to you asserting yourself. What I mean by that is we’ve gone through the whole content farm thing. The industry goes in cycles. People want to trust other people. That’s the bottom line.So the more you are yourself, the more you’re going to make connections with other people. That’s what is going to drive everything. It’s going to drive your business, it’s going to drive your community, it’s going to drive attention. It’s very, very draining on certain things, but for a long time we’ve had the main factor of celebrity coming out of Hollywood. And I think that’s going to dissipate quickly. We’re still going to be entertained. There’s still going to be a value in quality production, but in terms of “expertise” specifically within an industry that you talk about social media, everybody has these experiences. And everybody shares these experiences whether they’re in a broad scale or a narrow scale.There’s only so much attention you can spend, only so much attention you can give. So the value of attention you can get, is going to increase. While at the same time the amount of attention you get is going to decrease. So the more things that get thrown at you, get thrown at everybody else. Where can you stand? Where are all the values at? What are the things that no one else has? Nine times out of 10, it’s going to be psychology. It’s going to be personality. That’s a unique perspective, but people. It’s interesting to me how this industry evolved. It’s difficult to pay attention to everything. You have to be able to be your own filter or rely on filters to cut through a lot of the noise.The Fight For AttentionRW:How do you get your news and get a feel for what’s going on and what people are talking about?CP: I say Facebook, Google+ Twitter. And emails, too. If I don’t see it in any of those channels, it’s possible I’m not going to see it. There are a lot of outstanding apps out there that allow me to dissect information and take it all in. Which makes it more difficult from a publisher’s perspective because if no one reads it, is it really going to matter. If you pour your heart and soul into something and spend a lot of time and money on something, it isn’t going to go anywhere. I mean that on a very micro level. Even an article, if it’s so outstanding and no one sees it, because there’s so much attention put to other things, it causes me to question the validity of spending two hours on an article when you’re not even going to get the money back on the time you invested putting that out there. When the same thing could happen in a tweet, or a link.And that is a greater challenge for content providers because the value of written content is being greatly diminished because of these platforms. The more things we have to pay attention to, the more precious our time becomes. I mean that in a business way and I mean that also in a virtual sense, because it’s almost indelibly intertwined. With everyone out there writing, creating, who’s listening? That’s the biggest hurdle I think that the industry has at this point. It becomes easier and more difficult. You cannot scale to the level of traffic that would offset those costs, you’ve got to figure out, where can you benefit in the grand scheme of things if you want to establish yourself as a pundit. Or if you want to establish yourself as someone that has a perspective or something to add that’s different from everybody else. Where’s your value in this entire chain?RW: What are you most proud of in your career?CP: Being still up. I’m a still-up. There’s all this talk and buzz about being a start-up and what about the still-up? I think everyday that goes by  being able to turn through downturns and shift in direction and still be able to come out ahead. I’m not funded, I’m not effectively staffed and I bootstrap everything. That I am still able to be successful in light of all these hurdles, it does make me proud to say that I can still do it. But that’s just a a part of being able to watch trends and knowing where to spend the time and attention. RW: How has your personal brand helped Lockergnome and vice versa?CP: In many ways I think my name has superseded that brand (Lockergnome) for better or worse. It’s lent me amazing opportunities on either side. I reach more with my strategy, it’s definitely benefited me directly. Working With The Right PeopleRW: What would you say the hardest moment in your career was?CP: I definitely worked with a lot of wrong individuals. There are a lot of wrong people to work with. And I seem to find a lot of them. Not to say that the people that I’m working with now are in that range at all, but that’s the biggest drain on my time and attention and resources in general. I’ve made a lot of expensive mistakes and those expensive mistakes are largely in relation to really bad partnerships. Really bad hires. RW: And that’s you wanting to believe in someone and it not working out?CP: Pretty much. A lot of under-delivering and or hidden agendas. And that as a small business owner can really hurt you. It turns out I have the ability to attract people that want to be like me. And that doesn’t work. There’s only one me and that’s what helps make the business work. RW: What does the word “geek” mean to you?CP: I guess for me it boils down to being yourself or being passionate. A nerd may be (able) to talk about statistics and analytics and not be tied emotionally to something. I think a geek is tied emotionally to something. That’s my separation for me. At this point it doesn’t even really have anything to do with technology either. I think the definition has evolved. Disconnect? No ThanksRW: What’s a typical day like for you?CP: On an average day, to me, not much happens. Wake up, get coffee, now I carry the camera with me everywhere I go. It’s a point and shoot mod that’s targeted to real-estate developers. It’s a super wide angle lens, so I carry this with me wherever I go. I come home usually, go to the computer and plan what I’m going to be geeking out about that day on YouTube. Sometimes I’ll have meetings throughout the day. In the afternoons YouTube videos. At night usually is when I’ll edit the blog from yesterday and upload to YouTube. Amidst all this: Emailing, responding and following up, social media and trying to get a handle on where my business is going to be next. RW: How do you relax?CP: Honestly, I don’t. It is stressful. It takes a lot of work to make something look effortless. I enjoy taking a lot of information in and to me that’s relaxing. Otherwise my mind is always spinning, my mind is always thinking. I find it really difficult to disconnect. I’ve always been an information junkie.RW: Do you have any hobbies that you do to get you disconnected?CP: I’m an adult fan of Leggo. The problem is I just haven’t had the time. Like this has been hell week: Microsoft, Apple, Google, boom boom boom. It’s been crazy. RW: Any outdoorsy stuff you like to do?CP: Hello no. I’m a great indoorsman. I did a brief video series on that, I tried years ago. I’m a great indoorsman, I can cook a marshmallow over a stove and climb the stairs. RW: What are you going to be for Halloweeen?CP: I’ve got a stormtrooper uniform. Funny thing, I surprised the pizza delivery guy one day. I opened the door and he went “whoa.” Kind of taken aback. I tipped him well.  Tags:#startup 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Related Posts adam popescu Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

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