Juventus reach Sarri agreement with Chelsea

first_img0Shares0000Maurizio Sarri lifted his first trophy as a coach in his final game in charge of Chelsea © AFP / Kirill KUDRYAVTSEVLONDON, United Kingdom, Jun 14 – Maurizio Sarri is set to return to Italy to take the vacant managerial role at Juventus and bring the curtain down on a fretful one-year stay at Chelsea.Sarri met his targets by returning Chelsea to the Champions League via a third-placed finish in the Premier League and winning the Europa League, claiming his first major trophy as a coach in the process. However, a failure to connect with the Chelsea support, public criticism of his players and a refusal to adapt his style of play meant Sarri was always unlikely to hang around for a second season at Stamford Bridge.The 60-year-old former banker becomes the ninth full-time manager to leave Chelsea since Roman Abramovich took charge of the club in 2003.Yet, for once the Russian didn’t wield the axe and waited instead until Juventus agreed to pay the compensation to free Sarri from the final two years of his contract on Thursday, according to reports in England and Italy.The Italian champions are keen on the brand of football Sarri imposed during three years at Napoli when only Juventus’ remarkable consistency prevented the Neapolitans a first league title since the days when Diego Maradona graced the San Paolo pitch.However, Sarri failed to transport that free-flowing football to Chelsea, despite making midfield playmaker Jorginho his first signing.After a brilliant start to the season that saw Sarri’s men keep pace with Premier League champions Manchester City and Champions League winners Liverpool, Chelsea fans soon rebelled at a ponderous possession game with little cutting edge.After a 2-0 defeat at Arsenal in January, Sarri labelled his players “very difficult to motivate”.– Frustration –Worse was to come as a 4-0 thrashing at Bournemouth was followed by a 6-0 demolition by Manchester City — Chelsea’s heaviest defeat in 28 years.The players soon started rebelling too. Goalkeeper Kepa Arrizabalaga refused to be substituted towards the end of the League Cup final to stay on the field for a penalty shootout, which Chelsea lost to City in February.Supporters also voiced their frustration, calling for Sarri’s sacking, during a controversial 2-1 win at relegated Cardiff a month later.Sarri, though, did manage to end on a high as Chelsea lost just one of their last eight Premier League games while the other contenders for a top-four finish stumbled towards the end of the season.Eden Hazard then bade farewell in fitting fashion by scoring twice in a 4-1 rout of Arsenal in the Europa League final to ensure Chelsea again ended the season with a trophy despite the turmoil.Yet, that will be an even tougher test for Sarri’s successor without Hazard, who joined Real Madrid earlier this week for a fee in excess of 100 million euros ($113 million).Chelsea currently cannot recruit a replacement with the club serving a two-window transfer ban handed down by FIFA.Frank Lampard is the favourite to succeed Maurizio Sarri as Chelsea manager © AFP / Adrian DENNISThe club’s record goalscorer Frank Lampard is the favourite to return to Stamford Bridge after just one season in management at Derby County.Lampard, 40, led the Rams to the Championship playoff final where they fell just short of a return to the Premier League.The former England midfielder will not suffer any of the hostility encountered by Sarri in the Chelsea fan base.But it represents a huge gamble both for Lampard so early in his managerial career to take the huge step up to a top-six job, and for a club in transition to back a rookie manager.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Half-time: Brentford 0 Derby 1

first_imgChampionship front-runners Derby controlled the first half at Griffin Park and took a deserved lead through Chris Martin.The goal came on 27 minutes as left-back Craig Forsyth clipped in a low cross for the sliding Martin to guide into the far corner.Steve McClaren’s side were lively from the off, with Simon Dawkins firing into the side netting from a tight angle early on, but the Bees defence largely kept them arm’s length.Brentford mainly played on the break in the first half, with Jota looking their liveliest player.Andre Gray twice got into good positions but his final pass let him down, while Jon Toral floated a shot high and wide of the far post.Brentford began playing their usual 4-1-4-1 but switched to 4-2-3-1 before the goal in an attempt to shore up their midfield.They are without Alan McCormack, who is sidelined for three months following ankle surgery. Moses Odubajo is deputising at right-back, while Toral pipped Alex Pritchard to a starting place. Sam Saunders is in a matchday squad for the first time since January. Brentford (4-1-4-1): Button, Odubajo, Dean, Craig, Bidwell; Douglas; Jota, Diagouraga, Toral, Judge, Jota; Gray. Subs: Bonham, Saunders, Dallas, Pritchard, Smith, Tarkowski, Proschwitz.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Whistle through the wilderness

first_imgTaking a break with a herd of elephants. Tent town in the dry Shashe river bed. Awesome views across rivers and bushveld are plentiful. Children in the Wilderness learn about their environment.(Images: Tour de Tuli)MEDIA CONTACTS • Kim TaylorMedia spokesperson+27 11 807 1800RELATED ARTICLES• The pain is soon forgotten• Getting to know a different South Africa• Exploring bicycle culture in South AfricaLucille DavieSome 350 cyclists are getting ready for the ride of their lives – riding with elephants through game reserves in Botswana, Zimbabwe and South Africa.The eighth Tour de Tuli ride, a magical four-day, 300km mountain bike ride, takes place from 3 August, starting in Botswana and ending in the spectacular Mapungubwe Game Reserve in South Africa’s Limpopo Province. Cyclists cross the dry Shashe River bed, wade through the Limpopo River, and ride through elephant and lion country.Two days are spent riding through Botswana, before the crossing into Zimbabwe, where another two days are spent riding through bushveld. Then the route crosses to South Africa for the last night where riders have sundowners overlooking the confluence of the Shashe and Limpopo rivers, gazing into Zimbabwe and Botswana.The big five roam its diverse wilderness of savannah, riverine forests, marshland, open plains and sandstone outcrops. Mopani bush, fever trees and ancient baobabs dominate the flora. This vast area, some 175 000 acres of pristine game land, is home to Africa’s giant – the elephant. Their silent presence, grazing quietly on large swathes of Mopani bushes, is an awe-inspiring feature of the ride. There are some 900 of these giants in the area, so riders are bound to bump into a few along the way.The Tour de Tuli is run by luxury ecotourism company Wilderness Safaris, and is its annual effort to raise funds for Children in the Wilderness. The last is a non-profit organisation that provides an environmental and life skills educational programme for children, with the goal of inspiring them to care for their natural heritage, and take charge of their heritage in the future. It operates in seven countries – Botswana, Malawi, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.Tuli BlockLarge areas of the famed Tuli Block are covered on the ride. The block is a huge, shared game reserve between the three countries. Riders spend two days in Botswana’s Northern Tuli Game Reserve, starting in the Mashatu Game Reserve, or the Land of Giants. A further two days are spent in the Tuli Circle, after crossing the once-mighty, 800m-wide Shashe River into Zimbabwe, now largely a dry, sandy river bed, and finally crossing the Limpopo River into South Africa.“It’s not a race; this cannot be emphasised enough,” says Russel Friedman, one of the founders of Wilderness Safaris and a board member of Children in the Wilderness. “We spend five to six hours a day in the saddle, traversing pristine wilderness. The route does not include manicured single tracks; we follow animal tracks through areas that are normally only accessible to animals, elephants and now mountain bikes.“Many new friendships are created on the tour. The days are long, and tough, but well worthwhile being able to appreciate the biodiversity of these incredible areas,” Friedman adds.Tented campsFor those four days, 150 staff will move into the area with 2 500 tents, setting up five camps – two in Botswana, two in Zimbabwe and one in South Africa. They will ship in 100 000 litres of water for showers, over 15 000 litres of drinking water, 618 cases of soft drinks, 489 cases of beer, 177 cases of wine and spirits, 100kg of biltong, and 67 bottles of sunblock. Three 18-wheel trucks will load up the provisions, ready for tired cyclists when they wheel their bikes into each camp.And that’s not even the food, which will be brought in by 13 eight-ton trucks. All meals are provided, with support stations along the route making sure cyclists keep up their energy levels. Riders gather the night before the start at the Limpopo Valley Airfield in Botswana, across the Limpopo from Pontdrif in South Africa, to prepare to leave in batches the next morning.Children in the WildernessThe prime task of Children in the Wilderness, established in 2004, is to host children’s camps, eco-clubs and sponsor staff training. Wilderness Safaris hosts 16 to 30 children aged between 10 and 17 each year. During the year, eco-clubs are run at the schools, which foster in the children a love of wildlife. Other programmes include school feeding, water supply, school buildings and eco-mentoring training.“Children in the Wilderness increases children’s awareness, bridges cultural divides, broadens horizons, builds confidence, provides opportunities for new friendships and choices, and reveals career opportunities,” says the company.Eco-clubs, which take place at rural schools, follow a curriculum and take place weekly, monthly or every three months. They give schoolchildren who are interested in the environment a chance to meet, learn, discuss and expand their knowledge of environmental issues. They also look at health, HIV/Aids awareness, nutrition, life skills, geography, geology, arts and craft, and theatre.“In turn, Wilderness Safaris camp staff are allowed to be mentors and leaders, connecting them to their jobs, instilling them with pride for their culture and their community, and offering an enriching experience exposing new skills and talents.”Some 4 500 children have been hosted in Wilderness Safaris camps in the seven countries since 2001.The routeOn day one, riders take a 60km route which includes sightings of elephant or even big cat encounters within the Croton forests, zipping over slick rock formations, and lots of undulating single tracks. Riders overnight at the Amphitheatre Bush Camp in Botswana.On day two they head towards the Maramani Camp in Zimbabwe, a 72km ride, once again riding along single tracks on ancient elephant trails. An informal border crossing on the other side of the Shashe River is established, where an official at a wooden table on the river bank stamps riders’ passports.Day three consists of 58km of riding with spectacular sandstone features where herds of game feed all night. Riders cycle past eland, impala, and elephant, with baboons in the trees overhead. There are two options on day four: the longer and more challenging 84km route, or a shorter 47km route along jeep track.Crossing the LimpopoRiders have to cross the Limpopo River, which flooded earlier this year. During the floods, 17 000 juvenile crocodiles were swept down the river from a submerged croc farm. The organisers say that most of the crocodiles have been recaptured, but the river is low this year, and crocs prefer to spend their time in deep pools, so there is no risk of riders being taken by one lurking in the water, says Nicola Taylor, logistics manager of the tour.“There have never been any incidents with crocodiles,” she adds. In recent years, the event has attracted more overseas riders, she says, with an estimated 20 percent of the field flying in for the ride.The major sponsor is Nedbank, and the Andy Scott, the head of Nedbank Group Sponsorships, says: “The route for this year’s Nedbank Tour de Tuli, with its breathtaking fauna and flora, will be both challenging and rewarding for the riders and will go a long way to ensuring that the tour remains one of South Africa’s premier multi-stage mountain biking events.”Once you have paid your R20 000 entry fee, you might find yourself uncontrollably humming or whistling or bursting into song while cycling the Tour de Tuli – lots of people do.last_img read more

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WHO endorses South Africa’s sugar tax

first_imgThe World Health Organization has backed South Africa’s stance on taxing sugary drinks. It is a step towards curbing non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and obesity, says the organisation. South Africa’s sugar tax is first announced on 12 February 2016 during the national budget. It will be implemented in 2017, once legislation is finalised. (Image: Pixabay)Brand South Africa reporterThe World Organization (WHO) has voiced its support for South Africa’s upcoming tax on sugared drinks. It is part of the country’s campaign to promote better health and curb the incidence of non-communicable diseases such as obesity and diabetes.Originally announced in the 2016 national budget by Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan, he said in his 2017 budget it would be implemented later this year after legislation had been passed and details finalised.“The WHO fully supports the government of South Africa’s commitment to implement a tax on sugary drinks as part of its ongoing drive to improve the health of its people and address the epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs),” says Dr Rufaro Chatora, the WHO’s representative to South Africa.Kudos to @WHOAFRO & Rufaro Chatora for briefing RSA Parliament on sugar tax & other measures to #BeatNCDs #obesity https://t.co/pjlSQKwbA1 pic.twitter.com/zRr1Gm6PZN— kent buse (@kentbuse) February 6, 2017Chatora adds: “By implementing a tax on sugary drinks to increase the prices of these beverages, South Africa will be taking a proactive step to reduce intake of sugars, which contribute to unhealthy weight gain and other diet-related NCDs, including diabetes.”Watch Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi talk about the sugar tax:According to a report titled “Mortality and Causes of Death” released on 28 February 2017 by Stats SA, “the three leading causes of natural deaths in 2014 were tuberculosis (TB), diabetes mellitus and cerebrovascular diseases”.While TB remains the leading cause of death in the country, NCDs continue their rise in the rankings of top 10 leading causes with diabetes mellitus moving from third position in 2014 to second position in 2015.The findings, says Stats SA, will help in better planning and meeting the National Development Plan goal to ensure a long and healthy life for the population by 2030.WHO member states around the world, including South Africa, have committed to halting the rise of obesity and diabetes, and reducing the number of deaths from NCDs by 25% by 2025, and by 33% by 2030. The latter target is in line with the Sustainable Development Goals.Setting a good exampleSouth Africa’s stance on sugary drinks and other products that can negatively affect health such as tobacco and alcohol, Chatora says, sets an example that other countries can follow.“By taking such actions, South Africa is demonstrating that with political commitment and investment in health promotion that it is possible to beat back the scourge of NCDs, including diabetes and obesity.”Additionally, the co-operation between the departments of Finance, Health and others, Chatora says, demonstrates the importance of acting to curb NCDs.“Experience from other countries that have implemented taxation of sugary drinks has demonstrated its potential to reduce consumption of sugars and raise revenues that can be used to prevent and control diabetes, obesity and other NCDs,” the WHO says.South Africa will be the first country in Africa to implement a sugar tax. Other countries that have already done so include Mexico, Hungary and France. The UK plans to do so in 2018.Eat a healthy diet with 3-5 servings of fruit & vegetables a day, reduce sugar, salt & saturated fats intake to prevent type 2 #diabetes— WHO African Region (@WHOAFRO) April 9, 2015Focus on health issuesBesides the sugar tax, the budget addresses other issues related to the health of South Africans:The commitment to achieve universal health coverage in line with the country’s National Development Plan;Increasing excise duties on alcohol and tobacco; and,/li>Plans to establish a National Health Insurance fund, initially to improve access to maternal, ante-natal and family planning services; expand school health programmes; and improve services for people with disabilities, ageing populations and people requiring mental health services.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Early Facebook Employees’ New Project Quora Opens to the Public

first_imgTags:#news#web ReadWriteWeb posted the first screenshots of the service in January, but Quora has been subject of intense press scrutiny ever since – while remaining accessible only through a loose invitation system.Meanwhile, Facebook itself is developing a Q&A system and is rumored to be engaged in a back-and-forth war of IP blocking between its employees and Quora’s. We’ve heard that there’s more animosity than that going on behind the scenes as well.Meanwhile, Quora has remained a small site building itself to ensure scalability when this time finally came. Public launch day was marked by a very nice write-up in the Wall St. Journal. Quora is a good little site, but it’s hard not to wonder if the hype, funding and press coverage is warranted given the traction-to-pedigree ratio.Those of us who have enjoyed using it among a select group of early adopters may find the new public Quora to be a different animal. That’s certainly what happened when the marginally-related Aardvark went from red-hot to Google acquired to uselessly swamped with half-baked questions from the Google-using public. (Sorry, it’s true!) Quora is closely tied in to the Facebook “social graph” of its users, something that may help it avoid Aardvark’s fate if if ever gets in front of a large number of people.Let’s see what you’ve got, Quora. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Real-time social Question and Answer service Quora has opened to the public after months of high-profile development in closed beta. The service was started by a group of early Facebook employees, most notably Facebook’s first CTO Adam D’Angelo. It’s a beautifully designed site but is entering a very crowded Q&A market.The company has raised millions of dollars in venture capital, at a very high valuation, and is rumored to be in a nasty spat behind the scenes with Facebook leadership. It’s also been a great place to get inside dirt on Silicon Valley startups. Ready to take a peak inside? The site is open to new users today. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… marshall kirkpatrick Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Merger with CPI not on CPI(M)’s agenda: Prakash Karat

first_imgMerger of CPI(M) and CPI was not on the agenda of CPI(M) but the party would strive to strengthen the Left unity in the country, CPI-M General Secretary Prakash Karat said on Thursday. CPI-M would work for closer co-ordination with CPI to strengthen the unity of Left forces in the prevailing political circumstances, Karat told reporters on the sidelines of a seminar organised in memory of veteran Marxist leader late E M S Namboodiripad. On questions about his continuance as general secretary of the party despite the drubbing it received in the assembly polls in West Bengal and Kerala, Karat said it was the party which has to decide the matter. “If the party desired so (continuance as general secretary), I will abide by that,” he said. Earlier inaugurating the seminar, Karat said Marxism had faced challenges during the last three decades both in theory and practice. Many of these challenges emanated out of the globalised finance capitalism, he said. He said it was important to look at Marxism, in theory and practice, in “a new way” with an “authentic understanding” of its theories and their applications in the changed context.- With PTI inputsFor more news on India, click here.For more news on Business, click here.For more news on Movies, click here.For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more

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