Montreal passenger rights advocate loses legal round in court battle against United

first_imgMONTREAL – A Montreal passenger rights advocate has lost a legal round in a 20-year-old dispute with United Airlines.Jeremy Cooperstock said the Federal Court of Canada has ruled that his website Untied.com infringed on the American airline’s trademarks and copyright.He issued a brief statement Friday saying he strongly disagrees with the ruling and plans to appeal.“I find it difficult to understand how someone could confuse my parody of Untied Airlines’ conduct against its passengers with the services of an airline,” he said in an email.Cooperstock said he can’t understand how anyone could think his website, which parodies United’s conduct against its passengers, is a United website.The airline giant issued a statement Friday saying its pleased with the decision.“We have always maintained that Mr. Cooperstock should be able to voice his opinions, and our case was to protect United customers and avoid confusion by asking him to not use our intellectual property on his website and related channels,” the airline said in an emailed statement.United also sued Cooperstock in the Quebec courts in 2012, alleging Untied.com resulted in the protracted harassment of employees by disgruntled passengers.A lawyer for United testified in a separate action in Quebec Superior Court last year that the airline doesn’t object to Cooperstock’s right to run the website or complain about its performance.However the airline demanded Cooperstock remove employee contact information he posted on the website.A posting on Cooperstock’s website said the superior court ruled in favour of United and the province’s appeal court dismissed his challenge of the ruling.Cooperstock’s fight with the airline began from a string of minor incidents dating back to 1996, after which he set up the website a year later.last_img read more

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Lowcost electronic tablet proves worth in Indian classroom

first_imgAddThis ShareRice UniversityDavid RuthDirector, National & Broadcast MediaO 713-348-6327; M [email protected] UniversityJade BoydAssoc. Director, Science EditorO 713-348-6778; M [email protected] Technological UniversityWang Meng MengAssistant Director, Media RelationsO (65) 6790 6681; M (65) 9007 [email protected] electronic tablet proves worth in Indian classroomI-slate designers in US, Singapore prep for early adoption of low-cost, educational tabletThe U.S.- and Singapore-based creators of the low-cost I-slate electronic tablet are preparing for full-scale production now that a yearlong series of tests has shown that the device is an effective learning tool for Indian children.The I-slate, an electronic version of the hand-held blackboard slates used by millions of Indian children, will eventually be solar-powered for use in classrooms that lack electricity. It is being developed by researchers at the Institute for Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics (ISAID), a joint program of Rice University in Houston and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore. When mass-produced, the solar-powered I-slate is expected to cost less than $50 (64 Singapore dollars).“Our study clearly shows the I-slate is an effective learning tool for all students, regardless of their learning ability,” said computer scientist and I-slate creator Krishna Palem, director of ISAID. “The first production I-slates will be pre-loaded with lessons for mathematics, science and social studies.”Palem, a Nanyang Visiting Professor at NTU and Rice’s Ken and Audrey Kennedy Professor of Computing, first conceived the power-saving educational tablet in early 2009. Late last summer, Palem’s Rice-NTU team began working with the Indian nonprofit Villages for Development and Learning Foundation (ViDAL) to test I-slate prototypes in a class of 10- to 13-year-olds at Mohd Hussainpalli village, about 70 miles southwest of Hyderabad.In March, the researchers examined whether the I-slate helped students’ improve in mathematics. Students use a stylus to tap and write out mathematics problems on the I-slate. They get immediate feedback about correct and incorrect answers. When answers are incorrect, the machine gives hints and tips about how to correct mistakes.Using a series of sophisticated measures, the ISAID team analyzed each student’s performance and improvement. Students were also surveyed about the features of the I-slate that were most and least useful. Palem said the tests and surveys confirmed the I-slate was effective and provided the ISAID team with valuable information needed to finalize the I-slate’s design.“We know more than 90 percent of what we need to know at this point,” Palem said. “We’ve settled the hardware questions, and that is central to the manner in which the lessons are taught and the manner in which the students interact with the I-slate.”The hardware and graphic content for the I-slate must be developed in tandem because they will ultimately use a revolutionary new low-power computer chip — another of Palem’s inventions. The new chip will cut the power requirements for the I-slate in half and allow the device to run on solar power from small panels similar to those found on handheld calculators. The current I-slate hardware, which uses conventional chips, was designed by ISAID’s Vincent Mooney, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology.ISAID team members in Switzerland, Singapore and the U.S. are developing the first production version of the low-power computer chip. Solar-powered I-slates containing the new chips are due for production in mid-2012.Palem said a Los Angeles-based consortium of media and content developers headed by Marc Mertens is putting the finishing touches on the math, science and social studies curriculum. Both the content and the finalized I-slate design will be rolled out with traditional chips this fall. About 50 students in Mohd Hussainpalli and other nearby villages will receive battery-powered versions of these slates for a six-month trial.“Working with Marc, we’re planning to bundle a social-networking element into the software that will allow the students to work collaboratively on writing assignments,” Palem said.“We are at an exciting stage and based on rigorous testing, we have achieved quite a few firsts in this early phase of adoption,” said Rajeswari Pingali, ViDAL founding chairperson. “Soon students will be able to take the slates home for use and improving their learning outcomes. We spoke to all parents of the children; they too are equally excited about the I-slate. We are particularly happy about the potential benefits for young girls, who otherwise might be married away at a very early age.”-30-VIDEO is available at:https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2023/IMG4903.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more

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