RSF and 40 NGOs call for immediate release of Dr Abduljalil al-Singace

first_imgAmericans for Democracy and Human Rights in Bahrain (ADHRB)ARTICLE 19Bahrain Centre for Human Rights (BCHR)Bahrain Human Rights ObservatoryBahrain Human Rights SocietyBahrain Institute of Rights and Democracy (BIRD)Bahrain Press AssociationBahrain Youth Society for Human RightsCairo Institute for Human Rights Studies (CIHRS)Canadian Journalists for Free Expression (CJFE)CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen ParticipationCommittee to Protect Journalists (CPJ)English PenEthical Journalism NetworkEuropean – Bahraini Organisation for Human Rights (EBOHR)European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR)Front Line DefendersGulf Center for Human Rights (GCHR)Index on CensorshipInternational Forum for Democracy and Human Rights (IFDHR)Irish PenKhiam Rehabilitation Center for Victims of Torture (KRC)Maharat FoundationMothers Legacy ProjectNo Peace Without JusticePEN American CenterPEN CanadaPen InternationalProject on Middle East Democracy (POMED)Rafto FoundationRedressReporters Without BordersSalam for Democracy and Human RightsSentinel Human Rights DefendersShia Rights WatchThe Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI)The European Centre for Democracy and Human Rights (ECDHR)The International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH)Tunisia Initiative for Freedom of ExpressionVivartaWales PEN Cymru to go further Follow the news on Bahrain Help by sharing this information RSF_en August 27, 2015 – Updated on January 20, 2016 RSF and 40 NGOs call for immediate release of Dr Abduljalil al-Singace News News October 14, 2020 Find out more News BahrainMiddle East – North Africa German spyware company FinFisher searched by public prosecutors Receive email alerts Coronavirus “information heroes” – journalism that saves lives March 17, 2021 Find out more BahrainMiddle East – North Africa Organisation June 15, 2020 Find out more Bahraini prisoner of conscience Dr Abduljalil al-Singace today hits a milestone 160 days of hunger strike as rights organisations appeal for his freedom. Forty-one international NGOs today released an urgent appeal addressed to the Government of Bahrain to release the hunger striker.On 21 March 2015, Dr al-Singace went on hunger strike in protest at the collective punishment and acts of torture that police inflicted upon prisoners following a riot in Jau Prison earlier that month. Since then, he has subsisted on water, fizzy drinks and IV injections.The United States government recently stated their awareness of Dr al-Singace’s case and urged Bahrain to ensure adequate medical care for all prisoners and an investigation into all reports of mistreatment. The UK government has previously raised his case with Bahrain, though they have never called for his release. The 41 NGOs call on the international community, and in particular the US and the European Union, to urge for Dr al-Singace’s release.The release of the urgent appeal also coincides with a protest led by the Bahrain Institute for Rights and Democacy (BIRD), English PEN, Index on Censorship and REDRESS outside the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, London, calling on them to take action on Dr al-Singace’s case and to put pressure on the Bahraini authorities to end human rights abuses in Bahrain and its prisons.Sayed Ahmed Alwadaei, Director of Advocacy at BIRD: “The United Kingdom should use its leverage with Bahrain to secure Abduljalil’s release and hold their ally accountable. He is a blogger, a journalist, a thinker and categorically should not be in prison.” Cat Lucas, Writers at Risk Programme Manager, English PEN: “PEN remains seriously concerned for Dr al-Singace, now on the 160th day of his hunger strike in protest at the treatment of his fellow prisoners. We continue to urge the Bahraini authorities to release Dr al-Singace and the many other writers of concern to PEN unconditionally, and to allow him access to the medical attention he requires, as well as to reading and writing materials, as a matter of urgency.” Jodie Ginsberg, CEO, Index on Censorship: “Dr al-Singace has been on hunger strike for more than five months and the UK has yet to call for his release. His arrest, sentencing and treatment in jail have received international condemnation and we call on Britain to join global counterparts in calling for Dr al-Singace’s release and ensuring he receives appropriate medical assistance.”Dr Abduljalil al-Singace is a prisoner of conscience and a member of the Bahrain 13, a group of activists arrested by the Bahraini government for their role in peaceful protests in 2011. Dr al-Singace is a blogger, academic, and former Head of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Bahrain. Dr al-Singace is currently serving a life sentence ordered by a military court on 22 June 2011. News Tenth anniversary of Bahraini blogger’s arrestlast_img read more

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Armory Center for the Arts Appoints Joan Dooley as New Director of Studio Programs

first_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday More Cool Stuff Community News Left: Entertainer and philanthropist Tony Bennett visits Joan Dooley’s East L.A. classroom in 2013. Dooley was instrumental in securing a major grant from Bennett’s family foundation for the Humanitas Academy of Art & Technology at Esteban E. Torres High School. Right: Self portrait by Joan Dooley.Pasadena resident Joan Dooley’s credentials are genuinely impressive: writer for a major east coast newspaper; award winning photographer; Getty curator; multi-credentialed K-12 educator, nationally board-certified art teacher; and winner of several “teacher of the year” awards for her work with inner-city teens. Starting this September, we are happy to announce that Joan Dooley will join the Armory’s administrative team as its new Director of Studio Programs.Each year, the Armory’s Studio department manages 400 tuition-based art classes taught by 35 teaching artists, serves over 1,500 students (ages 2 to adult), and awards more than $100,000 in tuition assistance. Armory teaching artists are seasoned educators and practicing artists with advanced degrees from the nation’s top art schools.“I’m thrilled to come on board with an arts organization as outstanding and innovative as the Armory” said Dooley. “I’m looking forward to collaborating with the highly-skilled and dedicated staff to build upon our shared mission of empowering lives and communities through art… and I’m especially excited to be working right here in my home community of Pasadena.”After earning an MA in Art History from UMass Amherst, Dooley transitioned from a career in journalism at the venerable Worcester Telegram & Gazette to join the J. Paul Getty Museum’s curatorial team in Malibu—organizing the institution’s world-class photo collection for exhibitions and publications. Joan was the lead curator for several Getty photo exhibitions, including Lisette Model (1991) and Albert Renger-Patzsch (1996).Since 1999, Joan has taught photography at inner-city public high schools in Los Angeles, most recently at East L.A.’s Humanitas Academy of Art and Technology where she was instrumental in securing sizable grants from Tony Bennett’s Exploring the Arts Foundation. Otis College of Art & Design (2003) and CalArts (2007) both named Joan teacher of the year for her work with teens. Joan’s students are among the most honored in LA County, earning national recognitions from the Scholastic Art Awards (the nation’s oldest); the US Congressional Art Competition; the Los Angeles Film Festival; and the prestigious grand prize from the Los Angeles Music Center’s annual Spotlight Awards. In 2011, Joan was honored by Ovation Television and the Scholastic Art Awards as Southern California’s teacher of the year for garnering the most student art awards of any high school teacher in the Southland. In 2013, Joan and her students were featured in two Los Angeles Times articles.Joan is also an artist specializing in fine art documentary photography. Her photos have received many awards, including several Women in Photography honors and National Geographic’s annual 2009 international World in Focus competition.“We believe that Joan Dooley is a fabulous fit for our team with impressive skills, experience, determination, and a cheerful spirit,” says Scott Ward, the Armory’s Executive Director. “With Joan, we have an exciting opportunity to reexamine and reinvent our 25-year-old Studio program to meet the evolving needs of our 21st Century community.” Dooley will officially join the Armory’s administrative team in September, 2016. For more information about the Armory’s Studio program, visit armoryarts.org/studio.About the ArmoryArmory Center for the Arts believes that an understanding and appreciation of the arts is essential for a well-rounded human experience and a healthy civic community. Founded in 1989, The Armory builds on the power of art to transform lives and communities through creating, teaching and presenting the arts. The organization’s department of exhibitions offers diverse programs at its main facility and in locations throughout the region. Additionally, the Armory offers studio art classes on-site and a variety of standards-based art programs to more than fifty schools, community centers, parks, and detention centers in the greater Los Angeles area. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy People Armory Center for the Arts Appoints Joan Dooley as New Director of Studio Programs From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 | 4:11 pm Business News Community News Top of the News center_img Herbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. First Heatwave Expected Next Week Subscribe Make a comment 4 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimeslast_img read more

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Fear of Coronavirus in Venezuela: ‘What Do I Do With Masks, If I Don’t Have Water or Electricity?’

first_imgBy Gustavo Ocando Alex / Voice of America / Edited by Diálogo Staff March 13, 2020 Without water, health preservation is an impossible task, Venezuelan doctors and nurses say to illustrate their fear and concerns about the risk of a coronavirus outbreak in the country.They say that hospitals lack medication, surgical equipment, and primary care supplies, such as masks, I.V. drips, and thermometers, or a moderately operational infrastructure. They also lack the most essential element: water.“The main preventive measure against the coronavirus is washing your hands, and we don’t even have water. We are not ready to fight that illness,” says Dora Colmenares, organization secretary of the Association of Physicians in Zulia, Venezuela’s most densely populated state with nearly 4 million inhabitants.Coronavirus, a respiratory infection, has caused more than 5,000 deaths, with about 130,000 people infected worldwide. Venezuela’s neighboring countries, such as Brazil, Ecuador, and the Dominican Republic, have confirmed cases in their territories.People infected with the disease might require inpatient care, and the quality of these services in Venezuela has seriously deteriorated, according to the report from the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet.The imminent threat has raised concerns among physician and nursing unions of Venezuela, their representatives told Voice of America.Colmenares, a surgeon at Maracaibo University Hospital, one of the most important hospitals in the country, says that fear prevails among her colleagues.“There is fear. Health has regressed to 19th century levels in Venezuela. There aren’t any blood pressure monitors or alcohol in our hospitals. There’s no water… water!” she says, stressing on the lack of water in health centers of the region that border Colombia.The professor at the School of Medicine of Zulia University said that Venezuela’s Ministry of Health has not disclosed epidemiology reports since 2016.Colmenares says that most intensive care units in Zulia are “practically shut down. […] If a patient who’s infected [with coronavirus] seeks assistance, where will they be treated? What medication are we going to provide?” she asks.No electricity, water, or ventilationThe stench of urine and feces pervades in the hallways on the first floor of Maracaibo University Hospital, in the afternoon of March 2. The only and poorly operating restroom on that floor, used by both men and women, is only steps away from the pediatrics area and operating rooms.A masked employee mops the floor, flooded with brown, fetid water — the toilet has broken down.In the hallways, signs display information about diabetes and other illnesses. No sign warns or offers recommendations about the coronavirus.Bachelet’s report, published in June 2019, mentioned water among the “major determinants of health,” which are scarce in Venezuelan hospitals.According to the document, which the Nicolás Maduro regime rejected, Venezuela’s health situation is “critical.”Hania Salazar, head of Zulia’s Nursing Association, said that none of the hospitals in the region are appropriately equipped to eventually assist coronavirus-infected patients.Health centers, she says, lack potable water and antiseptic soap for doctors and nurses to wash their hands.Unsanitary conditions in the region are so “critical” that there isn’t a single hospital with functioning restrooms, she says, citing reports from her union.Salazar believes that cleaning and sterilizing hospitals will be practically impossible in the country during a widespread coronavirus outbreak.“Some hospital areas are shut down due to lack of electricity or sanitation. What do I do with a mask, or 20 million masks, if I don’t have electricity, water, ventilation; if there is no proper sanitation?” she says.last_img read more

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