‚€100 million potential for Irish charities

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The ultimate decision will be made by the Minister for Finance as to whether the proposal will be in the forthcoming budget but it comes at a time when Ireland’s finances are in very good shape. The banks are thought to be in favour because they dislike the tax as much as the consumer. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. ‚€100 million potential for Irish charities Howard Lake | 17 October 2006 | Newscenter_img  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Irish government is looking at a proposal that would allow credit card holders to redirect ‚€100 million in credit card tax to charitable causes. The proposal has been backed by over 100 charities and, crucially, some banks. Irish consumers currently pay ‚€40 stamp duty on their credit cards and the proposal would see people redirecting it to charities and sports organisations. The tax is collected annually so in theory the ‚€100 million would be a yearly total.The campaign is being led by a former KPMG accountant, David Burke. The Department of Finance, while voicing concern about setting a precedent, has expressed ‘interest in the proposal’, which are usually code words for support or at least neutrality. Advertisement Tagged with: Irelandlast_img read more

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Authorities put brakes on Turl St Dash

first_imgStudents were also reported to have urinated on the walls of their rivals’ college and a small group of Jesus students attempted to break into Exeter.But rivalry between the two colleges dates back centuries. It is believed that in the 1960s, Exeter students fed a flock of pigeons laxatives before letting them loose in Jesus’ Dining Hall. The Jesus retaliation to this incident reportedly involved varnishing Exeter toilet seats.Jesus College’s Alternative Perspective notes that “The Jesus/Exeter feud has been going strong for several hundred years after the initial street battles and shows no signs of abating.”The Dash itself is not associated with violence. The nature of the Dash is one secretively protected by Jesus College members.“The ban would have been re-imposed regardless”One Jesus undergraduate, who wished to remain anonymous, said that, “only a few are privy to the whole story behind the Dash and I’m not going to share it!”He also noted that the Dash is usually banned by college officials every year.He said, “The ban would have been re-imposed regardless of whether or not there had been a fight.”He also said that, “The punishments received as a direct consequence of the fighting were entirely proportionate.”Second year Exeter lawyer, Alice Loughney summed up popular student opinion at both colleges. She commented that the so-called enmity is “definitely not taken seriously, it’s more of a harmless friendly rivalry.”The future of the Turl Street Dash remains uncertain. The annual Turl Street Dash has been banned by both Jesus and Exeter College authorities, following violence last year’s event and national media attention.The Dash is a long-standing tradition involving Jesus students participating in a bicycle ride around Oxford finishing on Turl Street, usually preceded by heavy drinking.But students at both colleges were warned that any attempt to participate in a Dash this year would result in heavy punishment. This follows the events of last Hilary term, when the Dash escalated into a drunken brawl between students at Exeter and Jesus.In response to the fight and the press coverage it received, Exeter’s Junior Dean and Jesus’ Dean outlined their intention to punish those responsible and ensurethat the incident would not be repeated.Last week, Exeter students were informed by e-mail that the “Turl Street Dash is banned” and that any students found participating would be “heavily disciplined.”Jesus JCR President received an email to similar effect. In the e-mail, the Dean of Jesus College warned that, “After the fracas and adverse national publicity of the event last year you should know that I promulgated a ban on the event.”The e-mail also cautioned that anyone found organising or participating in the Dash would “incur my severe displeasure.”In February of last year, Cherwell reported on the events of the Dash which ended in violence between the colleges. The Sun ran the story under the headline ‘Uni-Cycle Riot’. Jesus students were reported to have come out onto Turl Street to cheer on competitors in the bicycle race. Chanting and swearing degenerated into fighting between some Exeter and Jesus students. The subsequent fight allegedly left students injured and bicycles damaged after they were thrown around in the street.last_img read more

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Trojans look to win second-straight contest

first_imgFor nine straight games, the USC men’s basketball team failed to produce a single win. Then, on Jan. 28, they put an end to what had been a long losing streak while simultaneously picking up their first Pac-12 victory by defeating the Utah Utes, 62-45.Momentum swing · Coming off their first conference victory, the Trojans look to finish the season strong against Washington State. – Luciano Nunez | Daily Trojan“It was nice getting the monkey off of our back,” junior center James Blasczyk said. “It shows us that we can win if we play hard.”Now the Trojans will have a chance to do something they haven’t accomplished since Nov. 30: win back-to-back games.On Thursday night, USC will take on the Washington State Cougars at the Wallis Beasley Performing Arts Coliseum in Pullman, Wash. The Cougars (11-10, 3-6) have been nearly unbeatable at home, touting an 8-1 record.They’re averaging 71 points per contest while sporting a 47.2 field goal percentage, ranked No. 48 in the country. USC coach Kevin O’Neill knows his team faces an uphill battle as it travels to the Pacific Northwest.“What we have to do is play our best game on the defensive end and give ourselves a chance to score offensively by not turning the ball over,” O’Neill said.The Trojans will try to slow down center Washington State Brock Motum, who is averaging 16.4 points and 6.5 rebounds and most recently put up a career-high 34 points in a 71-67 loss against Arizona State.“We’re going to have to front his post-ups,” O’Neill said. “He’s also a good outside player and he shoots the ball well. He’s a guy who has developed into a real pro in the last year. Last year he wasn’t a guy that was even a big part of their offense but he’s very talented.”One of the players who will be responsible for guarding Motum, Blasczyk, is the only true center remaining in the rotation. Blasczyk has been slowed down by a ligament injury in his foot.“Basketball-wise, it’s pretty difficult, but I always feel like my motor is going,” Blasczyk said. “I have a lot more responsibility but I don’t really feel it. I just feel like going out there and playing basketball.”Against the Utes, USC benefited from sophomore guard Maurice Jones and sophomore forward Garrett Jackson’s combined 32 points. The Trojans will need more of the same against the Cougars, especially with a depleted roster lacking depth due to injuries.“With what we’re down to on our roster, with six scholarship players and four of our starters from the beginning of the [season] out for the year, it’s going to be a challenge,” O’Neill said.Following Thursday’s game, which is set to tip-off at 7:05 P.M. and can be heard on 710 AM ESPN Radio, the Trojans will finish up a two-game set in Washington by taking on the Huskies (14-7, 7-2) on Saturday. For now, O’Neill is satisfied with his team’s preparations leading up to their next few contests.“I thought the guys have been good,” O’Neill said. “They’ve been good coming off losses, coming off the win on Saturday. They’ve practiced hard, they’ve done their job, and I can’t ask much more of them than that.”last_img read more

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