Take an Up Close Look at Caltech’s Role in the Apollo Program

first_imgEVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Science and Technology Take an Up Close Look at Caltech’s Role in the Apollo Program By ANDY VITALICIO Published on Wednesday, July 10, 2019 | 3:46 pm Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Make a comment Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Apollo 11’s historic “giant leap” into history would not have been capable without some jet propulsion from a certain Pasadena-based laboratory, and Caltech’s Theodore von Kármán lecture series will consider that matter at a July 17 talk by academic luminaries.The von Kármán lecture series is named after the founder of Pasadena’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and its next edition will discuss the significant role JPL played in the Apollo space program.The Apollo program’s conquering of the moon took a decade of intense preparation to accomplish. It required a huge Earth-bound support system.JPL’s role in the program entailed robotic precursor missions – unmanned remote controlled spacecraft that probed the lunar environment – and management of the Deep Space Network, which relayed television transmissions and provided backup communications capability.In the meantime, Caltech – which operates JPL for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) – established a laboratory in the mid-1960s to develop techniques that needed for analyzing lunar samples. Once Apollo 11’s trove of Moon rocks were on the ground, Caltech researchers raced to contribute to the first stunning scientific results NASA shared with the world.Friday’s event will focus on understanding Caltech’s and JPL’s supporting role in one of humanity’s greatest achievements.Hosted by Preston Dyches, the event will feature Blaine Baggett, a JPL Fellow and Emmy award-winning producer; Arden Albee, Caltech Professor Emeritus of Geology and Planetary Science; and John Casani, a JPL veteran engineer of the Ranger and Surveyor robotic missions era.The von Kármán Lecture Series, presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, brings the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies to both JPL employees and the local community.This is a free event and no tickets or reservations are required.The lecture starts at 7 p.m. and runs through to 8:30 p.m. at Caltech’s Beckman Auditorium.For more information, call (626) 395-4652 or visit https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2019&month=7. HerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Reasons Why The Lost Kilos Are Regained AgainHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Fashion Trends You Should Never Try And 6 You’ll LoveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Fashion Tips Are Making Tall Girls The Talk Of The TownHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeauty Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business Newscenter_img Community News Top of the News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Subscribe Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy 3 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community Newslast_img read more

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The Wiz Live! Team Introduces a New, Free-Willed Dorothy

first_imgWhen NBC’s The Wiz Live! airs on December 3, viewers will meet a brand new Dorothy for a brand new day. The Kansas girl is no longer a victim of chance; she’s doing the Nae Nae; she even has a new song with her Ozian friends.Tony winner Harvey Fierstein has revamped the musical’s book to tell a story apt for 2015, but his work extends past modernizing the dialogue. “There are certain questions I’ve always had,” he explained at a recent press event. “What is her journey? Is she just a victim? I made her in charge of her own life.”In Fierstein’s new script, Dorothy—originally from Omaha—lives with her aunt (played by Stephanie Mills, The Wiz’s original Dorothy) after her parents died. She misses Nebraska, but learns on her journey through Oz that home is where you love and are loved. There is purpose behind her actions that lead to that discovery.“It’s very modern. It’s a girl trying to find out and where she belongs in 2015,” newcomer Shanice Williams, who takes on the seminal role for the telecast, explained. The 19-year-old had her own moment of questioning where home was just before booking this gig: “I went to school in Los Angeles and was like, ‘I do not belong here.’ I came [to New York] and auditioned for this the day after I got off the plane.”With new autonomy comes some new moves. “We have every fun street dance that’s out there,” choreographer Fatima Robinson said. “We’re Hitting the Quan, we’re hitting the Nae Nae.” Arranger Stephen Oremus and music producer Harvey Mason Jr. were tasked with creating a new sound for said steps. “We have a hybrid of all the different musical styles that feels modern, but also honors the score,” said Oremus. Skeptical? Williams assured us it’s done “in the classiest way. It’s not gonna be ratchet!”Oremus and Mason Jr. also collaborated with Ne-Yo and Elijah Kelley—NBC’s Tin Man and Scarecrow, respectively—to introduce a new song roughly halfway through the presentation. The number, titled “We Got It,” features Dorothy rallying her newfound companions as they set out to kill the wicked witch Evillene.Ne-Yo and Mason Jr., both Grammy winners for R&B (as performer and producer, respectively), understood the challenge of adapting to a new medium. “There’s a difference between that style of writing [for radio] and writing for theater. The storytelling element has to be kicked up,” explained Ne-Yo.Mason Jr. still has hit-making on his mind, though he’s careful not to compromise the number’s context: “It’s telling a great story. A song like this would be a bit of a long-shot at radio, but it’s the kind of thing that could stand out.”For director Kenny Leon, this is an opportunity to expand a theatergoing audience to millions of spectators in just one night. Whether they are coming in as fans of the original musical, the 1978 film or the new all-star cast, he wants to make this an experience specific to today, and that’s just what he hopes these changes do.“I tried to honor [book writer] William Brown, [Broadway director] Geoffrey Holder and [composer] Charlie Smalls, but I’m also trying to address it for now,” Leon said. When they turn the TV off at 11 o’clock, I want people to talk about what it meant to their lives.”All of these alterations were made especially for the telecast, but with the intention to incorporate them in a forthcoming Broadway revival, slated for the 2016-17 season. “We’re thinking in terms of the proscenium,” producer Neil Meron said, looking ahead. “‘Oh, this would work on Broadway. Will these costumes work? The choreography? Harvey’s script?’ All of that has a dual purpose.”There may be pressure—and some big silver shoes to fill—but Williams has undoubtedly found a new home on the stage and screen. And a new family as well: “She asked me if she could call me Uncle Kenny,” Leon said. “I said yes.”And what does the original Dorothy have to say about her latest successor? “I had to find a way and make it mine; now she’s finding her way,” said Mills. “She’s delicious as Dorothy. She’s a star. Her Yellow Brick Road is going to be gold.” View Commentslast_img read more

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