Letters

first_imgThis week’s lettersLetter of the weekHR must practise what it preaches Well done to your correspondent for speaking out in “Agencies and HRcould care more”, (Letters, 5 June). Having been “deselected” just before Christmas as part of thePrudential’s restructuring that you featured, I found myself in a very similarposition – long experience in HR, the wrong side of my 40s and redundant. Although I was lucky enough to find a handful of agencies that were willingto put some effort into matching my skills against vacancies in theirdatabases, the vast majority of them were completely silent and even seemed toresent me phoning from time to time to check on progress. I was also on the receiving end of questions on how I felt about workingwith people younger than me and even suspicion because, at the age of 45, I wasnot an HR manager (my choice). The icing on the cake was answering questions about the O-level exams I took30 years ago. The delays your correspondent is experiencing are more cock up thanconspiracy. Nevertheless, HR simply does not practise what it preaches. Despite finewords on ageism, youth appears to be everything and stereotypical judgementsare still made about people based on how old they are. I even remember a recent front page story in your journal about younghigh-fliers, which came out at the height of my own job search. There should be more mature people in HR. We might then feel our experienceis genuinely valued and we still have a chance of finding work in our chosenfield. I cannot see that happening, and the solution for me was to broaden mysearch. Despite my qualifications and track record, I left HR behind and movedinto a new field. Curiously, within three weeks of doing that, I was offered anexternal HR role. Des Farthing Via e-mail Recruitment must rip up rule book The sentiments expressed in “Agencies and HR could care more”reflect a widespread problem in the recruitment industry. I have seen this fromboth sides – as an HR professional and as a candidate – and have been bitterlydisappointed by the performance of a number of agencies. As an HR professional, I was fed up with receiving speculative CVs fromagencies on the off chance, and others that in no way reflected the briefprovided. Agencies had rarely met the candidates, so exactly how much work had theyput in for their 25 per cent commission? Then a colleague told me that an ex-employee of a well-known agency told herthat she had been encouraged to present as many CVs as possible – the more theclient gets, the more chance that they will recruit one of them. This delusion led me to develop a totally different approach to recruitment.We don’t use databases or CVs, we tailor everything to the vacancy, and wefocus on future ability, rather than historic technical competence. However, part of the problem lies in the way candidates apply for jobs. Iwant to know candidates really want the job – not just any job, but that particularjob. HR professionals complain about skills shortages – so stop doing things theway you’ve always done them, stop relying on computer process-driven agenciesand get radical. And candidates: stop doing the same thing. Do your homework, don’t just copyeveryone else. Recruitment needs a revolution, but until HR professionals, recruiters andcandidates rip up the rule books, we will continue to see skills shortages,poor service and discrimination. Chantal Walton Director HR on Tap, Cambridge There’s two sides to age bias story I have been out of work for a lengthy period in the past and share theconcerns about discrimination on the basis of age. I was, therefore, dismayed to read towards the end of the letter that thewriter did “not feel secure in putting my future in the hands of veryyoung staff.” Oops. Jon Friend Senior personnel manager The UK still won’t budge an inch I am 45 years old and was educated using the metric system. How old will I be before the UK finally adopts metrication? Your news headline, “Labouring under a ton of new legalpractices”, (News, 5 June) should read, “Labouring under a tonne ofnew legal practices” Mark Beaumont Senior loss prevention manager BOC Distribution Services Comments are closed. LettersOn 19 Jun 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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National Weather Service issues “falling iguana alert” in Florida

first_imgThe weather service went on to explain that iguanas are cold-blooded, so they slow down or become immobile when temperatures drop into the 40s. “They may fall from trees, but they are not dead,” the weather service said. On Saturday, Feb. 8, hiker Jeff Mitchell will offer a free presentation at the Dietrich Theater in Abington, Va titled “Hiking Through the Natural Beauty of Pennsylvania.” Mitchell’s presentation will focus on Pennsylvania’s parks and natural areas, including waterways. Free tickets will be available at the door or can be reserved by calling 570-836-1022. Mark your calendars for these popular hiking festivals slated to take place this spring in Tennessee and Virginia National Weather Service issues “falling iguana alert” in Florida The festivities kick off May 2 with the Erwin Great Outdoors Festival on Main Street in downtown Erwin. The festival’s purpose is to encourage people to “embrace their love for nature.” Mitchell is an experienced hiker and author of several books including “Hiking the Endless Mountains,” “Backpacking Pennsylvania” and “Paddling Pennsylvania.”  It may be the dead of winter but spring is right around the corner and, with it, three popular hiking festivals will return to Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia.  On Tuesday night the National Weather Service in Miami, FL issued a warning for Floridians to be on the lookout for falling iguanas, thanks to an unusual burst of cold air. The weather service sent out the warning on Twitter. “This isn’t something we usually forecast, but don’t be surprised if you see Iguanas falling from the trees tonight as lows drop into the 30s and 40s,” they tweeted. “Brrr!” Next up is Roan Mountain’s Hikerpalooza 2020, taking place on May 9, 10 and 11. The festival celebrates the fourth year since Roan Mountain was awarded the official AT Community designation and is part of an ongoing effort to promote “awareness, interaction and conservation of” the Appalachian Trail.  Finally, the 34th Appalachian Trail Days Festival is scheduled for May 15- 17 in Damascus, Va. The festival features a hiker parade, vendors and exhibitors, music, camping and more. Hiker Jeff Mitchell offers free presentation in Abington about hiking in PAlast_img read more

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Card innovations impacting the future of the credit union industry

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jeremiah Lotz Jeremiah Lotz directs PSCU’s initiatives to empower the company’s Owner credit unions with innovative and engaging payment solutions. Lotz leads an experienced team dedicated to delivering PSCU’s credit, debit, prepaid, … Web: pscu.com Details Today, payments options for consumers are endless, and credit unions should be prepared to provide members with access to as many offerings as possible. While new payment methods such as digital wallets and real-time payments are important, optimizing credit and debit card programs is also imperative for credit union success and for their cards to remain top-of-wallet. Here are eight innovations in card products and technology credit unions should have on their radar when it comes to optimizing, improving and marketing their card programs:Contactless – More consumers are using contactless/dual interface cards for tap-and-go transactions on a daily basis. Due to a reduction in the time it takes to complete a purchase, using contactless cards improves the point-of-sale experience for consumers. Once they realize their purchasing experiences can be enhanced and quickened through contactless, consumers will naturally start to gravitate toward these cards at all locations where they are accepted. Contactless is also expected to drive mobile adoption as an increasing number of consumers experience the ease and speed of tap-and-go payment methods.Metal Contactless – Many credit unions are beginning to offer cards made of certain types of materials associated with different loyalty or rewards programs. Metal cards are seen as higher-end cards which can be used to differentiate an issuer’s brand and program offerings. Installment Payments – Credit unions are starting to explore the ability to give members the option to turn a high-dollar transaction on their credit card into a lower rate or fixed installment plan “loan” versus the traditional revolving balance option. For example, a credit union might see a member has made a large purchase and offer him or her the ability to pay the purchase off over a set amount of time for a small fee, versus paying a high interest rate for revolving the balance. Some larger banks and issuers – including American Express and Chase – already offer similar programs, which give consumers more control over their finances by allowing them to choose how and when they pay.  Digital Issuance – Issuing a digital card that can be accessed through a consumer’s mobile wallet provides instant availability to cards during initial opening or lost/stolen situations, which essentially eliminates the three- to four-day waiting period consumers typically experience when being issued a new card. Allowing for mobile and card-not-present transactions through digital issuance will make consumers less likely to move to a different card when theirs is lost/stolen, as they can continue making purchases and transactions while awaiting the physical card replacement.Enhanced Authentication – Credit unions are beginning to explore how to pass biometric authentication across channels to improve the member experience. Right now, biometric authentication is most commonly used to access a mobile app and is fairly secure given it utilizes a user’s fingerprint or face recognition. But how can that translate to the phone channel and be used to make authentication stronger in other channels? For credit unions, enhanced authentication techniques not only improve the member experience and deliver enhanced security, they also provide more data to utilize to make informed decisions about which authentication practices are best suited for particular members and channels.Loyalty and Rewards – There has been a shift across the industry as it relates to the types of loyalty and rewards program offerings and perks members want. Overall, they want choice in how and where they use their rewards. Some issuers and other providers are allowing consumers to redeem points for a purchase they have already made – essentially “removing” the transaction from their balance or lowering the overall cost of the purchase in exchange for loyalty points. Another up-and-coming trend is cashing in on reward points for experiences.Data and Analytics – Now that the industry has a better understanding of how to collect and analyze data, these insights are being used to personalize and improve the cardholder experience. It allows credit unions to make faster and better decisions for members. For example, if a member purchases a flight and rents a car, the credit union might reach out and remind the cardholder to turn on card controls via the credit union’s mobile app so transactions are not denied while traveling. Credit unions are now using data to create experiences based on known information leading up to certain events or specific times.Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Robotic Process Automation (RPA) – Using data and technology offered through AI and RPA can enhance the member experience and ensure members are being offered card programs or other financial services offerings that are the most relevant to them. While these technologies do not change how payments themselves are made, they give credit unions, issuers and other financial institutions a way to create better experiences. Whether it is disputing a fraudulent transaction or serving a member when he or she calls in to the contact center, using AI and RPA allows for more automation and predictive analysis so financial institutions can be better prepared to serve members and consumers.last_img read more

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Alexander: From Clippers beat to Curt Gowdy Award – it’s Marc Stein’s story, too

first_imgMaybe it was the consequence of covering all of those Clippers teams during the bad years, the years of losses, holdouts, coaching changes and the recently fired having to sue Donald Sterling to get their guaranteed contracts paid off. Maybe, if you covered enough of those lean years, you picked up the reporting chops to earn Hall of Fame recognition.Marc Stein landed on the Clippers beat for the L.A. Daily News in February of 1994, just 10 days before the team traded Danny Manning – the No. 1 overall pick just five seasons before – to the Atlanta Hawks for Dominique Wilkins, then on the downside of his own magnificent career.“I just thought I was the luckiest person in the world,” he said. “They weren’t anywhere near a marquee attraction, but I got thrown into it. … Bob Weiss was the coach, and they were supposed to be a playoff team because they’d made the playoffs the previous two years (under Larry Brown). But they just imploded. They traded Manning, finished 27-55, traded Mark Jackson. It was a really chaotic season.“But for me, as a child of the ’80s, when the NBA was not on every channel, obviously I’d see a lot of the Lakers but I also saw a lot of the Hawks because they were on TBS. So for me to be covering Dominique at age 24, and to go to the (Atlanta) Omni and see Dominique lead the Clippers to a win, I couldn’t believe it. I was still star-struck.” Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers Clippers rookies key overtime victory over Oklahoma City Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years Stein’s first NBA story was on Divac when he covered the Summer Pro League for the Orange County Register in the summer of 1989. And he covered the Lakers during West’s years as general manager – and drew West’s ire for something he didn’t do in 1996, the summer the Lakers got Shaquille O’Neal.“I wrote a free agent preview for the Daily News,” he recalled. “It turned out that Long Beach (the Press-Telegram) used mostly my story but weaved some stuff from a New York Daily News story into my piece that suggested the Lakers had already done a deal with Shaq and had broken the rules.“The next morning Jerry stormed into (publicist) Raymond Ridder’s office and said, ‘Have you seen the clips?’ Raymond said, ‘Yeah, it’s right here’ (pointing to the Daily News story). Jerry said, ‘No, not that one, this one.’ He showed him the Long Beach story with my byline. He made Raymond call me, and then Jerry erupted on me.“I’m sure anybody who covered the Lakers remembered getting Jerry when he’s in that mode of losing his temper. It’s kind of like a badge of honor. I’m guessing he didn’t remember the next day; he got it out and it was forgotten.”Stein could be a walking history of sports journalism in Southern California over the past 30 years. He started at the Saddleback Valley News when he was still in high school and got a job at the Register when he started at Cal State Fullerton. He did an internship at the Washington Post the summer of his junior year at Fullerton and then did one at the San Bernardino Sun as a senior, covering the California League and the San Bernardino Spirit – home and road – in 1991.Related Articlescenter_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error “My first game was (future major leaguer) Mike Hampton’s no-hitter,” he recalled, adding that it was Hampton’s only victory that season; he was 1-7 with a 5.25 ERA. But fighting deadlines every night, while following the team to Reno, Stockton, Visalia, Bakersfield and the other garden spots of the Cal League was good training.He remembers the people who helped him move up. Mike Gallups, his high school journalism advisor at El Toro High, was an old high school classmate of the Register’s Earl Bloom, and Bloom helped get him on at the Register. Later, when he graduated from Fullerton at a time when jobs were scarce, Ken Daley – a former co-worker in Orange County and by then Dodgers beat writer at the Daily News – spoke up for him. Stein was hired by the Daily News for the copy desk, but within six months was writing about high school sports and pro tennis before the NBA beat opened in 1994.“That was my big chance,” he recalled. “Once I got on the Clippers, I wasn’t letting go.”He hasn’t [email protected]@Jim_Alexander on Twitter AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersThat didn’t last. When you’re doing your job as a journalist, it can’t. And Stein has done his job so well through the years – covering the Clippers and then the Lakers for the Daily News, the Mavericks for the Dallas Morning News and the national basketball beat at Dallas, then for ESPN and now the New York Times – that he will be honored by the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame on Thursday in Springfield, Mass., right alongside recently retired Clippers play-by-play man Ralph Lawler.Both men will receive the Curt Gowdy Media Award, given in recognition of distinguished service covering basketball.It will be a Southern California gathering this weekend, with lots of connected parts. Besides Stein and Lawler, former Lakers coach Del Harris (who Stein covered) will receive the John W. Bunn Lifetime Achievement Award at Thursday’s ceremony, along with Portland Trail Blazers general manager and president Harry Glickman.At Friday’s main induction ceremony, Bill Fitch (who Stein covered) will go into the Hall, although Fitch’s family announced Tuesday that for health reasons, he won’t be able to attend the ceremony. Additionally, Vlade Divac will be inducted as an international player, and Jerry West will be his presenter.“Surreal doesn’t even start to cover it,” Stein said. Clippers’ rhythm is missing but their spirits strong before playoff opener last_img read more

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Brilliant Burnage sends a message

first_img Click here for full scores Appropriately, his 11-under par score won the Michael Lunt Trophy, which celebrates the Walker Cup stalwart and 2005 captain of Walton Heath.  Third place at Walton Health with a six under par total of 282 went to 23-year-old Italian Philip Geerts. Former boy international Max Martin (Ladrook Park, Warwickshire) finished fourth, celebrating his 20th birthday last Sunday. “A round at Walton Heath was the best possible present,” he said. This is Burnage’s first 72-hole victory and his total of 277 represented fine scoring given the strength of the wind, the severity of the rain squalls and the clawing nature of the purple heather. England’s Jake Burnage sent a message to the Walker Cup selectors when he won the South of England amateur championship by a stroke at Walton Heath Golf Club, Surrey.  The 22-year-old will now focus on a second successful performance in the English amateur championship at The Berkshire next week. “My aim is to knock down the door with a sledgehammer this fortnight,” said Burnage, from Saunton, Devon, in reference to possible selection. 28 Jul 2017 Brilliant Burnage sends a message center_img In addition, in keeping with the tradition of the championship, the two courses had been stretched to their maximum lengths with tees located further back than even those facing hardened professionals in the annual US Open qualifying event. Burnage adds this success to his win the Hampshire Hog, a share of second place in the Brabazon Trophy and third place in the Lytham Trophy.  “I really went for the par putt because I knew that would reduce my handicap to plus-5,” he said. “The return putt did not bother me at all.” Burnage had shared the half-way lead with Jack Yule, 22, (Middleton Hall, Norfolk) who is a fellow member of the England A squad. Paired together and last out for both the third and fourth rounds, they duelled all day while the chasing pack kept their distance. The drama continued to the final hole where Burnage led by three standing on the last tee. He drove his ball into thick heather on top of a bunker and had to hack back onto the fairway. With Yule holing for a birdie three Burnage needed to two putt from 25ft for victory – but slid his first putt 4ft past, before safely holing out.last_img read more

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Spurs hire WNBA star Becky Hammon as assistant

first_imgIn this July 1, 2014 file photo, San Antonio Stars’ Becky Hammon, right, drives to the basket as Connecticut Sun’s Chiney Ogwumike, left, defends during the second half of a WNBA basketball game in Uncasville, Conn. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)As a 5-foot-6 point guard, decorated WNBA veteran Becky Hammon has never had the experience of shattering a backboard with a dunk.She’s busting through the glass ceiling instead.The San Antonio Spurs hired Hammon as an assistant coach on Tuesday, making her the first full-time, paid female assistant on an NBA coaching staff. When Hammon retires from her 16-year WNBA career at the end of the San Antonio Stars’ season, she will immediately move to the staff of the defending NBA champions, working with the revered Gregg Popovich on scouting, game-planning and the day-to-day grind of practice like no woman has ever done before.“Nothing in my life has really ever been easy. I’ve always been someone who did it uphill,” Hammon said. “I’m up for challenges. I’m up for being outside the box, making tough decisions and challenges. … And I’m a little bit of an adrenaline junkie. Throw those all in there and this was the perfect challenge and opportunity.”That makes her fit right in with the Spurs, an organization with a reputation for bold decisions. Popovich and general manager R.C. Buford have long been at the forefront of the league’s international influx and earlier this summer hired European coaching legend Ettore Messina as an assistant.During the 2001-02 season, Cleveland Cavaliers coach John Lucas brought Lisa Boyer into the team’s practices and some games. Boyer, now an assistant at South Carolina, was not paid by the Cavaliers and did not travel with the team, but did work with the players and coaches that season.“I very much look forward to the addition of Becky Hammon to our staff,” Popovich said in a statement released by the team. “Having observed her working with our team this past season, I’m confident her basketball IQ, work ethic and interpersonal skills will be a great benefit to the Spurs.”But Popovich and Buford were not available in person and Hammon had the spotlight entirely to herself.“Congratulations to Becky on today’s announcement,” Boyer said in a statement. “It’s a great thing for her and for the NBA. I am still so thankful to John Lucas for giving me the opportunity to work with his NBA team during my time with the Cleveland Rockers. His staff and players welcomed me as a coach, and it was an incredible experience for me to spend that season with them.”Last season, Hammon attended Spurs practices, film sessions and sat behind the bench at home game after suffering a torn ACL that kept her from playing. She’s been friends with Tony Parker and Tim Duncan since competing in an NBA All-Star shooting competition in 2008, a familiarity that will help as she makes her transition to coaching the two stars.“As far as women coaching men, it’s really silly. People ask me all the time, will there ever be a woman player in the NBA?” Hammon said. “To be honest, no. There are differences. The guys are too big, too strong and that’s just the way it is.“But when it comes to things of the mind, things like coaching, game-planning, coming up with offensive and defensive schemes, there’s no reason why a woman couldn’t be in the mix and shouldn’t be in the mix.”It’s been a long time coming for female basketball players and coaches who have long dreamed of getting a chance in the NBA.“I was so excited and pleased and the one thing that people have to remember is that the San Antonio Spurs don’t do anything for effect,” said Nancy Lieberman, a former star player who was a head coach in the NBA Development League in 2009 and now serves as the GM of the Texas Legends. “That’s not who they are. They don’t do this for the record-breaking barrier. They do things out of respect.“And the fact that coach Popovich has this much respect for Becky’s basketball IQ, for how she handles herself with the guys in practice, her ability to relate to them, I’m sure he saw so much when she was working with them last fall. I’m sure he didn’t hire her because she was a woman. I’m sure he hired her because she was the best person for the job.”“This will open the door for other women, even like myself,” Lieberman added. “My goal is to coach in the NBA and you’ve got to start somewhere. So this is a great day.”Charlotte Hornets sideline reporter Stephanie Ready, who served as an assistant on the Coppin State men’s team as well as in the D-League, called Popovich the perfect person to hire Hammon “because he’s proven he has a tremendous track record and he does not make bad decisions.”“That’s the first step, having the precedent set is very important,” Ready said. “A lot of it also is now women will know these jobs are available. In the past, a lot of women probably didn’t try because they didn’t think it was possible. I think you may very well see an increase in seeing some females hired.”Hammon has a reputation of being a smart, hard-nosed, tough-minded player. She made six All-Star teams and averaged 13.1 points in her 16 seasons with the Stars and New York Liberty.Hammon was receiving congratulatory messages from all over, including from Lieberman, Boyer and Lakers star Kobe Bryant.“I love seeing people I’ve been involved with have an opportunity in life to have these types of experiences,” said Stars coach Dan Hughes, who has coached Hammon for eight years. “This one is unique. She’s ready for it, she’ll do a great job.”Even tennis great Billie Jean King weighed in on the hire, congratulating the Spurs for acquiring “a key person based on their qualifications and not allowing gender to play a role in their decision.”But like it was only a matter of time before a woman got a chance to coach in the NBA, it’s also only a matter of time before said coach finds herself in Popovich’s crosshairs.“I’m sure Pop will be yelling at me soon enough,” Hammon said, “with the rest of them.”___AP Basketball Writer Doug Feinberg and AP Sports Writer Melissa Murphy in New York and AP freelance writer Raul Dominguez in San Antonio contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Theater Review: ‘I Remember Mama’

first_imgBy Gretchen C. Van BenthuysenPhotos by T. Charles EricksonRED BANK — “I Remember Mama,” based on Kathryn Forbes’ “Mama’s Bank Account,” was adapted for the Broadway stage by John Van Druten (1944). It was turned into a movie (1948) and TV series (1950s), before returning to Broadway (1979) as a musical lasting a mere 108 performances.The play, rarely performed these days, is set in 1910 and focuses on an extended Norwegian immigrant family who settled in San Francisco and is pursuing the American dream.So what else is there to say about it, especially in the digital age?Enter the award-winning Transport Group, a not-for-profit, off-Broadway company in Manhattan that stages new works and re-imagines revivals by American writers. Its mission: to present “visually progressive productions of emotionally classic stories (that) explore the challenges of relationships and identity in modern America.”From left: Dales Soules as Papa, Alice Cannon as Aunt Jenny, Susan Lehman as Aunt Sigrid, and Barbara Andres as Mama.Well, it did that with its excellent production of “I Remember Mama.” It breathes new life into this World War II era play.First staged in a gymnasium in 2014, the production currently is on the boards here in association with Two River Theater through June 26. Both productions were insightfully directed by Jack Cummings III, co-founder and artistic director of the Transport Group.Noncommercial theaters can and should take such risks and the Two River Theater audience has shown a willingness to embrace them. This season included an all-male “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” and is closing with this all-female “Mama,” and neither shows were gimmicks. They both challenged audiences to look at life and art differently and both succeeded.Ten actresses, age 60 or older, play 25 characters in “Mama.” Barbara Andres (veteran of nine Broadway shows, including “Cabaret” as Fraulein Schneider) recreates her role as Mama and seems born to play the part. Mia Katigbak is superb as her eldest daughter Katrin (the writer of the original story) and a teenager here.All the other parts are handled by Alice Cannon, Lynn Cohen, Rita Gardner, Marjorie Johnson, Susan Lehman, Heather MacRae, Louise Sorel and Dale Soules. They play Mama’s husband, her two other daughters and son Nels (a role in which Marlon Brando made his Broadway debut), her three sisters, Uncle Chris and boarder Mr. Hyde, a doctor, nurses and more.The women wear casual contemporary clothing (by Kathryn Rohe) and no makeup. They are extraordinary in their ability to conjure their characters with just a change of stance, voice or attitude.The set (by Dane Laffrey) consists of 10 wooden kitchen tables, the kind where families used to spend time sitting and talking and telling stories. Each table has a theme and is covered in items such as teacups, books, glasses, silverware, writing materials, small decorative boxes. Plain white walls, a metal emergency exit door and brilliant white overhead lights (lighting by R. Lee Kennedy) resemble a gym.Although the look is contemporary, the story of families sticking together, sacrificing for each other and stretching a dollar while looking to move up in the world is one that immigrants in America — most any country for that matter — experience and hear stories about around the dinner table. Or should.For the Hanson family of Steiner Street, it’s 1910 and Mama is counting out money for the landlord, the grocer, and for one new pair of shoes. Money for school supplies also is needed, but there is not enough. So Papa says he will give up tobacco, one daughter will work after school and another will babysit to help.Aunt Trina arrives and announces, at 42, she wants to marry a local undertaker. Aunts Sigrid and Jenny arrive and are appalled at the idea. Before long, scary Uncle Chris — the head of the family, Mama says — arrives and intimidates everyone — except Mama.Lynn Cohen (original Broadway productions of “Hair,” “Grey Gardens” and “Hands on a Hard Body”) plays both Mama’s English boarder Mr. Hyde, who reads the classics to the family at night around the table, and gruff Uncle Chris, playing both to perfection.When youngest daughter Dagmar falls ill, Uncle Chris inserts himself into the situation so much the doctor bans him from entering the hospital. Later we discover Uncle Chris, unmarried and childless, is almost broke because he secretly has been paying the hospital bills for sick and deformed children.As Katrin approaches graduation, she sets her heart on a set of modern combs and brushes. Mama trades her mother’s cherished silver brooch to get it. Katrin learns of the trade and is devastated by her selfishness.Don’t be surprised if you are not teary-eyed before the end of this memoir play about one mother’s strength and sacrifices for her family. It is, after all, the hardest job in the world.WHAT: “I Remember Mama”WHERE: Two River Theater, 21 Bridge Ave., Red BankWHEN: Wednesdays through Sundays, closes June 26COST: $37 to $65, limited number of $20 tickets each performanceMORE INFO: 732-345-1400 or http://tworivertheater.org Journalist Gretchen C. Van Benthuysen’s theater news and reviews can be found on theatercues.com._______________________________________________________________This article was originally published in the June 16-23, 2016 edition of the Two River Times newspaper.last_img read more

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Suit Seeks To Halt Mad Hatter Expansion Plans

first_imgIn court filings, Walsh and Gasiorowski also objected to some board members’ behavior, specifically Mayor Dina Long and Jon Schwartz, who seemed to express support for the project in newspaper accounts and on Facebook. “The hearing was tainted by the participation of these parties,” the complaint charged.In the complaint, the municipal board, along with the Kelly Management Group, LLC, are listed as defendants in this action.Kerry Higgins, the board attorney, did not immediately return a call this week seeking comment. By John BurtonSEA BRIGHT – The battle over the rebuilding of the Mad Hatter restaurant and bar is not over.Jennifer Walsh, a borough homeowner who is also a Republican candidate for Borough Council for this November’s election, filed suit in state Superior Court, in Freehold, last week, seeking to overturn the local unified Planning and Zoning Board of Adjustment’s decision approving the expanded Mad Hatter’s rebuilding project.The complaint, filed with Superior Court on Sept. 26, alleges the board, in its actions permitting the project to rebuild the popular nightspot damaged by Super Storm Sandy to move forward, rendered “a decision that was arbitrary, capricious and unreasonable” – the legal standard Walsh’s attorney will have to prove to have a judge reverse the local board’s decision. “I think the board just simply gave absolutely no consideration to my client and people living there,” Gasiorowski said of his client’s steps to stop the project.On the other hand, over the course of six torturously long hearings before the planning/zoning board starting last November and concluding in June, Mad Hatter’s owners Scott and Amy Kelly received a large amount of support from the public in attendance. Members of the public spoke and posted on social media, equating the bar’s rebuilding as Sea Bright’s rise from the devastation the town – and so much of the Jersey Shore – incurred from Sandy in October 2012.“The Kellys can feel the support from the community and they’re so grateful for that,” said Kevin Asadi, the attorney representing the Kellys. “And they’ve vowed to stay the course until their dream comes true.”The Kellys have owned and operated the Mad Hatter, 10 East Ocean Ave., since 2006. But Sandy wrecked the site, bringing with it 6- to 8- feet of water, mud, sand and debris, rendering the structure unusable. In 2013 the couple received board approval to construct and operate an outdoor facility, but Scott Kelly acknowledged there were noise complaints.Plans for the rebuilding of the Mad Hatter.The Kellys, under their Kelly Management Group, LLC, have been awarded a low-interest $5 million loan from the state Economic Development Authority to assist in the rebuilding of a Sandy-related damaged business.The Kellys’ plans are to build a completely new three-story elevated structure that would have a restaurant; an outdoor kiosk for takeout food and retail items; and upper levels to be used for bars and outdoor decks. Scott Kelly said he plans on having live entertainment and a building-wide stereo system.There was opposition from Walsh, who, as a New Street resident lives across the street from the site. Others raised concerns of the size and scope of the project, its multiple uses, and what that would mean for parking, municipal infrastructure, noise and the residents’ quality of life. Walsh earlier this year had appealed the local board’s approval for a plan to construct a multifamily residential development where a single family home had been on New Street, in close proximity to Walsh’s home. That matter is still pending.Walsh is running with fellow Republican Brian Kelly, an incumbent, for borough council, against independent candidates Linda Lamia and Kevin Birdsall, for the two seats available for the Nov. 8 election. In court filings, Walsh and her attorney, Ron Gasiorowski, Red Bank, criticized the board’s decision, pointing to its approval given the plan’s lack of proposed parking (under the borough ordinance there would be a need for 134 spaces and six will be provided, designated for employees); its use of 100 percent of lot coverage; its lack of front yard setback; and the building’s height.last_img read more

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Retired railroad foreman chosen for Keppel seat

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PEARBLOSSOM — Keppel Union School District trustees have selected a retired railroad foreman to fill a board seat left vacant by a resignation. Board members said Manuel Magana, 69, of Lake Los Angeles was selected from among three candidates because he has been active in Keppel schools and in the community. “The board is very pleased to have Mr. Magana join us. He’s been a longtime volunteer in our district and has been very active on a variety of committees,” board President Valorie Gorny said. “He has run for the board and sought appointments previously and has a marvelous track record of community service.” The Keppel board interviewed the three candidates and made the appointment at a special meeting Thursday. Magana will be sworn in at a board meeting next week. Magana replaces Craig Morgan, who resigned from the board to move to Texas. Board member Michael Dutton noted Magana comes from Lake Los Angeles, a community that has not been represented on the board. “Mr. Magana has been very active in the community and he’s served on a lot of district committees and been very involved in the district for a number of years, and I personally thought he’s made a lot of contributions to the community and was a good candidate for the board,” Dutton said. Magana retired from the Santa Maria Valley Railroad on the Central California coast in 1990 after suffering an injury. He has seven children and four grandchildren, one in a Keppel school, and has campaigned in the past unsuccessfully for a board seat. “I had been participating on different committees, so I figured it was time to try to be in on the decision-making,” Magana said. Magana said he will work to improve parent participation and the education and attitudes of schoolchildren. Magana also said his appointment will bring diversity to the school board. “Parents can bring whatever concerns they have, and we can work together to improve the communication among parents and schools,” Magana said. Magana has lived in Lake Los Angeles for 11 years. A child of migrant farmworkers, Magana said he moved frequently and found it hard to stay in school. “I really believe in education. I’m self-educated. I never went to school. I don’t want them to go through what I went through,” Magana said. — Karen Maeshiro, (661) 267-5744 [email protected]last_img read more

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Birmingham boss explains his tactical changes

first_imgBirmingham boss Gary Rowett said starving Tom Cairney of space was the key to their victory at Fulham.Clayton Donaldson converted a penalty just after the break – having missed one in the first half – and the Whites’ Michael Madl was sent off as Birmingham won 1-0 at Craven Cottage.And Rowett explained how his tactical switch in midfield kept key Fulham player Cairney so quiet.“Cairney’s a good player and with [Denis] Odoi giving some real good width as a full-back, we knew we had to block that inside space,” Rowett said.“We changed [Robert] Tesche and [Maikel] Kieftenbeld over, so Maikel played Cairney’s side and we had a little bit more of a defensive mindset around the pockets Cairney wants to get in.“We felt perhaps [Chris] Martin might have started up front. With [Matt] Smith starting, we just felt as though we had an opportunity to play a little bit higher up the pitch, because he’s perhaps going to find it harder to run away from you.“We certainly didn’t want them high up the pitch, delivering balls into the box.“I was slightly surprised they took Smith off. I can understand why Slavisa did it – with 10 men you need real mobility on the pitch – but again it gave us the opportunity to play a little bit higher because they didn’t have any physical presence up there.“Also, Scotty Parker not playing perhaps made a difference to their balance defensively in the first half.”Rowett was pleased with his side’s performance but felt the game could have been wrapped up sooner.He said: “The only disappointment is that we made it a little bit harder than it needed to be. I thought first half we were excellent, it’s as well as we’ve played.“We made hard work of it at times in the second half, and perhaps needed to be a bit more clinical.”See also:Jokanovic accepts blame for Fulham defeatFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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