India vs Australia: Bumrah reveals Rohit suggested slower ball to Shaun Marsh

first_imgMumbai Indians skipper Rohit Sharma and Jasprit Bumrah have orchestrated the downfall of quite a few batsmen during their successful association for their Indian Premier League (IPL) franchise.On Friday, Rohit and Bumrah were at it again, this time while donning the India whites, as they worked together to help India get a much-needed breakthrough at the stroke of lunch on Day 3 of the ongoing Boxing Day Test against Australia.Bumrah, who picked up his first five-for on Australian soil earlier in the day, said Rohit Sharma had suggested him the slower ball that left Australia batsman Shaun Marsh clueless and eventually trapped in front towards the end of the first session.Bumrah was bowling at full steam and looked the most threatening of the Indian bowlers on what had remained a slow and docile wicket in the first session on Friday. After hitting Marsh’s bat hard for five consecutive deliveries, Bumrah, from around the wicket, slipped in a full, slower ball that crashed into the pads of the left-handed batsman.”When I was bowling there [first session], the wicket had become really slow, the ball had become soft, nothing was happening. The last ball before lunch, Rohit [Sharma] was at mid off. He told me ‘you can try a slower ball like you do in ODI cricket’,” Bumrah told the media in Melbourne on Friday.”I thought, ‘yeah I can give it a go’ as nothing was happening. We thought some of their guys play with hard hands and we wanted to try that and the execution was good on the day.advertisement”I was trying to bowl a full, slower ball. I thought maybe it will dip or go to short cover. That was the plan and it worked.”The slower ball, which is a rarity in Test cricket, left commentators and social media users awestruck as it was perfectly executed. Bumrah’s strike helped India snap a 36-run fourth wicket stand. Bumrah ended up with figures of 6 for 33 as Australia were bowled out for 151 in response to India’s first innings total of 443.Bowling yorkers in Test cricket not easy: BumrahMeanwhile, Bumrah, who is known for his toe-crushers in limited-overs cricket, conceded that yorker is an underrated delivery in Test cricket but conceded that it’s difficult to execute yorkers consistently in the longest format of the game.”It’s little different in Test cricket. White-ball cricket, it’s only 10 overs. Yorkers take a lot of effort from the body. After bowling 25 overs with the red ball, it’s difficult sometimes to execute the yorker. But yeah yorker is an underrated weapon in Test cricket,” Bumrah added.”However, I believe you can’t overdo it as you make it easier for the batsmen to score runs when you get it wrong. But yeah, it’s effective when the ball is reversing.”Bumrah, who has been having a dream run in red-ball cricket since making his debut in South Africa earlier this year, said he is not surprised with his success in the longest format of the game and insisted he always wanted to play Test cricket despite being initially branded as a white ball specialist.”I am not surprised [with the success]. If I don’t believe in myself who else will? I always try to back myself. I have played in England, South Africa and Australia… all three different conditions. I haven’t bowled in India yet,” Bumrah said.”I always wanted to play Test cricket. People had only seen me playing white-ball cricket. But I had played a lot of first-class cricket earlier. I was always confident that I would be able to do well at this level whenever I get a chance. And I got the opportunity in South Africa. The start has been good and hopefully, I can keep on learning and keep getting better.”Notably, Bumrah broke a 39-year-old Indian record during the third day’s play at the MCG as he went past Dileep Doshi’s tally of 40 wickets, which had remained the most wickets by an Indian in his debut Test year. Bumrah has picked up 45 so far, and he might add a few more to that tally when he has a crack at the Australian batsmen during the second innings of the ongoing Test.Also Read | Jasprit Bumrah breaks 39-year-old Indian record in 1st year in Test cricketAlso Read | Ravi Shastri reacts after Aussie commentator insults Mayank AgarwalAlso See:last_img read more

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World Bank Report Says Jamaica Needs $16 Billion Annually to Deal With Disasters

first_imgStory Highlights A new World Bank Report is suggesting that, on average, Jamaica would need $16 billion annually to cover losses from natural disasters. A new World Bank Report is suggesting that, on average, Jamaica would need $16 billion annually to cover losses from natural disasters.Of this amount, it is estimated that $9 billion would be required to address hurricane damage to public and private buildings.Titled, ‘Advancing Disaster Risk Finance in Jamaica’, the report, which outlines proposals for the formulation of a country-specific comprehensive disaster risk finance (DRF) strategy, was officially launched during a ceremony at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel in New Kingston on Monday (July 16).According to the World Bank, the document is envisioned to be used as a planning tool for the potential development of a comprehensive DRF strategy that would equip the Ministry of Finance and the Public Service with information and instruments to manage contingent liabilities posed by natural disasters.Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Finance and the Public Service, Hon. Fayval Williams, welcomed the report, noting that it has laid out in great detail, a roadmap for Jamaica to follow.“I greatly appreciate the work that went into the analysis. It was rigorous, it was practical and the roadmap is straightforward in its suggested implementation,” she said.Mrs. Williams further noted that the report will help the Government to put in place those mechanisms and processes that will support the budget needed for disaster risk financing.“It would also help us to evaluate the various capital market options that can allow us as a Government to transfer that risk that we cannot and should not try to absorb,” she said.The Minister noted that over the years, the capital market for disaster risk has been developing financial instruments to help countries deal with disaster.Mrs. Williams contended that the country is now “at that point where we seriously need to evaluate and implement a set of financial instruments that suit our needs and will provide resources for us to call on to assist with swift recovery”.She argued that access to these resources is critical given the fact that hurricanes rob Jamaica of economic vitality and set the country back, on average, about 2.5 per cent gross domestic product (GDP) annually.Citing research findings from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Mrs. Williams further pointed out that since 1950, more than 12,000 natural disasters have been registered globally. During that same period, the Caribbean has been hit by 324 natural disasters.“Research shows that the economic impact of these 324 natural disasters in the Caribbean has been substantial, exceeding US$22 billion in cost over the period 1950 to 2016. We suffer about 38 per cent of the global damage from natural disasters,” she pointed out.Mrs. Williams thanked the World Bank team for helping to build the Government’s capacity in terms of knowledge base and in terms of the mechanism and systems that need to be put in place for disaster risk financing.In the meantime, World Bank Country Manager for Jamaica, Galina Sotirova, said the report is the first building block for the development of this framework for disaster risk financing.“The report is a result of three years of very close collaboration of the (World Bank Team) and the Ministry of Finance to analyse the gaps in mitigating natural disasters and related risks, and to develop customised solutions based on the priorities in the economic context in Jamaica,” she said.She informed that this is the first in a series of reports that the World Bank will be preparing after last year’s hurricane season, noting that similar reports are being prepared for other countries in the Caribbean. According to the World Bank, the document is envisioned to be used as a planning tool for the potential development of a comprehensive DRF strategy that would equip the Ministry of Finance and the Public Service with information and instruments to manage contingent liabilities posed by natural disasters. Titled, ‘Advancing Disaster Risk Finance in Jamaica’, the report, which outlines proposals for the formulation of a country-specific comprehensive disaster risk finance (DRF) strategy, was officially launched during a ceremony at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel in New Kingston on Monday (July 16).last_img read more

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