Members Of Tedeschi Trucks Band To Perform As “Whose Hat Is This?” In NYC

first_img[“Thanks to guest vocalist Jeff Taylor for the inspired artwork”] On a night off during Tedeschi Trucks Band’s 2015 Europe tour, fellow bandmates Tim Lefebvre (bass), Kebbi Williams (sax), JJ Johnson (drums), and Tyler “Falcon” Greenwell (drums) convened at the intimate A-Trane in Berlin for a special one-off evening of improvised music. The audio from this special evening made it onto a special recording, dubbed Whose Hat Is This? The record documents this historic night with selected tracks from the group’s electrifying set of free jazz and fearless exploration, and you can listen to it here.With Tedeschi Trucks Band’s residency at the Beacon Theatre starting this week in New York City, the players have scheduled a pair of Whose Hat Is This? shows at the 55 Bar. Tonight and tomorrow, Whose Hat Is This? will perform two sets of improv at the small venue at 10PM with vocalist Jeff Taylor. On Thursday, vocalist Jason Lindner will join the scene. Seating will be extremely limited at the shows, so come early and be prepared for some deep space musical exploration. More information can be found here.Listen to a selection from Whose Hat Is This? below:last_img read more

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Jungle boogie

first_imgAn April 15 Bleacher Report article by Tim Fitzgerald quotes Tori Hunter as saying, “Some Black players feel they are still unfairly discriminated against and he felt MLB GMs weren’t making an effort to sign Black players because Latino players were easier to control.” Fitzgerald goes on to say that, “The basic socioeconomic issues that affect African-Americans play a major factor. There are a lot of empty lots and fields in most urban areas with high Black populations. If you have a group of friends and a football, game on. Same with a park, with a hoop. Baseball, however, requires gloves, bats, and balls to be played properly—with enough players to cover at least half a field. It’s not as easy to put together a baseball game for poor Black kids.”I hear the same lame excuses about sports such as hockey. You need tons of equipment in order to pursue a career in hockey. OK, I hear all of the spinsters. The economy is bad, cities cannot afford to build and maintain baseball fields, they just do not have the money. Oh, but there is loot available, right? Non-profit organizations whose primary purpose is to stop the violence have sprung up like weeds all across America but violent Black on Black crime continues at a genocidal type rate. It seems to me that there might be some pocket padding going on because the only impact that many of these organizations are having is stopping violent knocks on their doors from bill collectors.Take some of that stop the violence money and restore some of those weed filled neighborhood baseball fields. Get out of the bright lights, quit “cheesin’” for every TV camera in the vicinity and stop swallowing every microphone with a signal. Get down in the trenches, low down and dirty. Break a sweat so that this curse may be broken.The world of pro sports is guilty for the systematic exclusion of Blacks as managers and owners. Black America is twice as guilty as the most astute “house Negro” for gleaning what they can off of the backs of those positioned a bit lower on the food chain.The “house that Jackie built” has long since been abandoned and demolished. In its place sits an empty lot. There must be a new house built. A new foundation must be put in place. We can no longer rest on the laurels of Jackie Robinson, Frank Robinson, Ernie Banks, Roberto Clemente or any of our iconic performers of the past. Don’t you get it boys and girls? When we constantly focus on the past, the present and the future fly by as a perverted blur. We miss it and don’t even realize what we miss. Erase all of the problems from the blackboard and begin to list some of the solutions.If you haven’t noticed by now, this communiqué is not about what MLB, NFL, NHL or the NBA can do for us; this is about what we can do for ourselves.Popcorn here, get your popcorn and peanuts. No, we are not at PNC Park. These sounds must be heard at neighborhood ball fields, everywhere. Unplug the video games. Demand that our children go outside and play. When you, me, no us, take ownership the world will notice and respond. Why should anyone take us seriously when Black America in its zombie-like state doesn’t seem to take itself seriously, oh except when we are watching BET or a Tyler Perry movie?Fitzgerald said, “It’s not as easy to put together a baseball game for poor Black kids.” I happen to look at that statement as a “crock” my friends.Don’t wait for MLB to build baseball academies in urban neighborhoods, get up off your “rusty dusty’s” and build them yourselves. If we want ownership then we should pool enough of our resources to buy a team. When we have the money we can demand legal remedies if we are not afforded the same ownership opportunities given to others. Jackie Robinson day should be renamed “get up off your butt day.” Excuse yourself from the “class of excuses.” It is time to “get to gettin’,” ciao.(Aubrey Bruce can be reached at [email protected]) The “boys of summer” who are at present hangin’ out at various locations in the “Sunshine State” are putting the final touches on their traveling trunks because the time to get to the train station is fast approaching. If they want to arrive at designated points north then they had better “git to gittin’” as my grandpap used to say snuff cup firmly in hand, snuff juice flying everywhere. As “Jackie Robinson” day approaches, my thoughts dwell on how Major League Baseball can create a lasting memorial to a great “American” athlete. That living and eternal tribute would be a little thing called ownership. There are not any Black owners, only a couple of Black managers, and dwindling numbers of Black players. The impact that Jackie Robinson had on MLB faded long ago. My father used to say “the log that we placed in the fireplace last week will not keep the ‘hawk’ away tonight.”last_img read more

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Overtime 10-16-13

first_imgFollow @NewPghCourier on Twitter  https://twitter.com/NewPghCourierLike us at https://www.facebook.com/pages/New-Pittsburgh-Courier/143866755628836?ref=hlDownload our mobile app at http://www.appshopper.com/news/new-pittsburgh-courier BILL NEAL :10 Ring…Rriinngg…Rrriiinnnggg, Yo! Smitty’s Bar and Grill, YOU STAB-UM, WE’LL SLAB-UM! Who?…Who!…Speak up. I can’t hear ya. Mike who?…Oh, you mean Coach Tomlin.  Yeah, he’s here, but he can’t come to the phone.  He’s in the back room with “Some Guys” and said he didn’t want to be disturbed by anybody for anything!  Well, tell him it’s Bill Cowher. Maybe he’ll pick up. OK, hold on a minute.  I’ll see what he says…(“Minute up”) yo Bill, Coach Mike said not to worry. He’s got this New York Jets game in the bag.  Hey Bill, one other thing, don’t tell anybody I said this, but “The Guys” Coach Mike is talking with have never been around here before…and they’re in town from New York…I mean, the black suits, dark glasses and black gloves. I don’tknow what to make of it but I overheard Mr. Gambino tell Coach Mike “Not to worry. Everything has been taken care of…You know what I mean!!!”:09 Here’s a double dip on your movie tip, and I know how you like to double dip.  Yes you do…yes you do…now shut up and enjoy!  Movie No. 1 “Prisoners” starring Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal and Terrence Howard, a dark, dark, dark drama about child abduction. Don’t go alone—and don’t go at night. Now you’ve been warned! I give it 4 basketballs. Movie No. 2…just for you…“Captain Phillips” starring Tom Hanks and a bunch of real ugly cats playing Somalia’s  (that’s people from Somalia for you Pea­body High School grads). Hey, don’t hate me. I am just telling ya what I saw. Real good movie. I give it 3 basketballs because we know how it ends…and it ain’t pretty!:08 If you saw Troy Polamalu deliver the hit on Steven Hill, you now understand what I mean when I said the Steelers must bring more of the mean and nasty!!!  And you noticed he didn’t try to help him up or see if he’s OK.  When you’re 0-4, you shouldn’t care if he’s OK.  I am just saying!:07 Man, it’s hard to believe L.C. Greenwood is gone. That one really hurt!:06 Word to the wise.  Everyone reading the Pittsburgh Courier…and there’s not enough of you…we all need to be about the business of saving the August Wilson Center.  To lose it would not only be a black eye for the City, but for Black folks too.:05 Penn Hills High School football is back on track, but that’s not the point. Get out and support your local team and support the good kids doing good things. Hey, take a kid to lunch after a game, win or lose. C’mon man!:04 Champion Enterprises is still looking for volunteers. People who care about improving the quality of our community and the lives of our young people. Call “The Champions” at 412-628-4856 if you’re interested. Serious inquiries only please!:03 Donald Scott, former great power lifter, I just got your letter from two years ago. Big mix-up at the office. Hit me back if you get this. I got you!:02 By now even you Aliquippa grads know that the Pirates are out of the playoffs. Opps, my bad, I am assuming the Mayor and Kevin Cameron got the electricity turned back on out there. Anyway, no one should have a bad word to say about the finish.  This is the best finish we’ve had in 20 years!:01 Here’s a rare but necessary second “I am just saying!” But it is possible that Le’Veon Bell is not the real deal. A few of those runs Barry Sanders would have broke for big gains.  Wait, what the hell am I talking about.  Forget I said that.:00 Oh, by the way, the Penguins are playing. I think they’re 4 and 1 or something.  Can’t lie. That’s all I got!~ GAME  OVER ~last_img read more

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Thurston EDC’s Center for Business & Innovation Welcomes Eva Coblentz as…

first_imgFacebook6Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Thurston EDCThe Thurston EDC is pleased to announce that Eva Coblentz has assumed the position of Program Manager for the Washington Center for Women in Business (WCWB).Over the past two decades, Coblentz’s career has encompassed project management, community engagement, and educational services for a number of governmental entities, military affiliates, and diverse community-based care organizations. Coblentz has also worked with non-profits and private corporations nationwide and at an international level.Coblentz has a BA in Business Administration and Master’s in Public Administration.As a small business owner, she was influential in developing a small business association to assist with marketing and collaboration among small businesses in the Des Moines, WA area. She focused on building long-lasting relationships and qualitative contacts with other people.Coblentz’s community engagement involves serving on the advocacy committee of the Junior League of Olympia, and as an advisory board member on The Latino Community Fund of Washington State.“I’m excited about the opportunity in providing a vast variety of resources to empower women entrepreneurs who support one another, which in turn empowers the next generation of women”, says Eva Coblentz, Program Manager of the Washington Center for Women in Business.For more information about the Thurston EDC visit the Thurston EDC website. For more information about the WCWB visit the Washington Center for Women in Business website.last_img read more

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Theater Review: ‘I Remember Mama’

first_imgBy Gretchen C. Van BenthuysenPhotos by T. Charles EricksonRED BANK — “I Remember Mama,” based on Kathryn Forbes’ “Mama’s Bank Account,” was adapted for the Broadway stage by John Van Druten (1944). It was turned into a movie (1948) and TV series (1950s), before returning to Broadway (1979) as a musical lasting a mere 108 performances.The play, rarely performed these days, is set in 1910 and focuses on an extended Norwegian immigrant family who settled in San Francisco and is pursuing the American dream.So what else is there to say about it, especially in the digital age?Enter the award-winning Transport Group, a not-for-profit, off-Broadway company in Manhattan that stages new works and re-imagines revivals by American writers. Its mission: to present “visually progressive productions of emotionally classic stories (that) explore the challenges of relationships and identity in modern America.”From left: Dales Soules as Papa, Alice Cannon as Aunt Jenny, Susan Lehman as Aunt Sigrid, and Barbara Andres as Mama.Well, it did that with its excellent production of “I Remember Mama.” It breathes new life into this World War II era play.First staged in a gymnasium in 2014, the production currently is on the boards here in association with Two River Theater through June 26. Both productions were insightfully directed by Jack Cummings III, co-founder and artistic director of the Transport Group.Noncommercial theaters can and should take such risks and the Two River Theater audience has shown a willingness to embrace them. This season included an all-male “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” and is closing with this all-female “Mama,” and neither shows were gimmicks. They both challenged audiences to look at life and art differently and both succeeded.Ten actresses, age 60 or older, play 25 characters in “Mama.” Barbara Andres (veteran of nine Broadway shows, including “Cabaret” as Fraulein Schneider) recreates her role as Mama and seems born to play the part. Mia Katigbak is superb as her eldest daughter Katrin (the writer of the original story) and a teenager here.All the other parts are handled by Alice Cannon, Lynn Cohen, Rita Gardner, Marjorie Johnson, Susan Lehman, Heather MacRae, Louise Sorel and Dale Soules. They play Mama’s husband, her two other daughters and son Nels (a role in which Marlon Brando made his Broadway debut), her three sisters, Uncle Chris and boarder Mr. Hyde, a doctor, nurses and more.The women wear casual contemporary clothing (by Kathryn Rohe) and no makeup. They are extraordinary in their ability to conjure their characters with just a change of stance, voice or attitude.The set (by Dane Laffrey) consists of 10 wooden kitchen tables, the kind where families used to spend time sitting and talking and telling stories. Each table has a theme and is covered in items such as teacups, books, glasses, silverware, writing materials, small decorative boxes. Plain white walls, a metal emergency exit door and brilliant white overhead lights (lighting by R. Lee Kennedy) resemble a gym.Although the look is contemporary, the story of families sticking together, sacrificing for each other and stretching a dollar while looking to move up in the world is one that immigrants in America — most any country for that matter — experience and hear stories about around the dinner table. Or should.For the Hanson family of Steiner Street, it’s 1910 and Mama is counting out money for the landlord, the grocer, and for one new pair of shoes. Money for school supplies also is needed, but there is not enough. So Papa says he will give up tobacco, one daughter will work after school and another will babysit to help.Aunt Trina arrives and announces, at 42, she wants to marry a local undertaker. Aunts Sigrid and Jenny arrive and are appalled at the idea. Before long, scary Uncle Chris — the head of the family, Mama says — arrives and intimidates everyone — except Mama.Lynn Cohen (original Broadway productions of “Hair,” “Grey Gardens” and “Hands on a Hard Body”) plays both Mama’s English boarder Mr. Hyde, who reads the classics to the family at night around the table, and gruff Uncle Chris, playing both to perfection.When youngest daughter Dagmar falls ill, Uncle Chris inserts himself into the situation so much the doctor bans him from entering the hospital. Later we discover Uncle Chris, unmarried and childless, is almost broke because he secretly has been paying the hospital bills for sick and deformed children.As Katrin approaches graduation, she sets her heart on a set of modern combs and brushes. Mama trades her mother’s cherished silver brooch to get it. Katrin learns of the trade and is devastated by her selfishness.Don’t be surprised if you are not teary-eyed before the end of this memoir play about one mother’s strength and sacrifices for her family. It is, after all, the hardest job in the world.WHAT: “I Remember Mama”WHERE: Two River Theater, 21 Bridge Ave., Red BankWHEN: Wednesdays through Sundays, closes June 26COST: $37 to $65, limited number of $20 tickets each performanceMORE INFO: 732-345-1400 or http://tworivertheater.org Journalist Gretchen C. Van Benthuysen’s theater news and reviews can be found on theatercues.com._______________________________________________________________This article was originally published in the June 16-23, 2016 edition of the Two River Times newspaper.last_img read more

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