Researchers use DNA strands to create nanobot computer inside living animal

first_img Journal information: Nature Nanotechnology Nanomolecular origami boxes hold big promise for energy storage (Phys.org) —A team of researchers at Bar-Ilan University in Israel has successfully demonstrated an ability to use strands of DNA to create a nanobot computer inside of a living creature—a cockroach. In their paper published in Nature Nanotechnology, the researchers describe how they created several nanobot structures using strands of DNA, injected them into a living cockroach, then watched as they worked together as a computer to target one of the insects cells. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Atomic force microscope images of robot architectures. Credit: (c) Nature Nanotechnology (2014) doi:10.1038/nnano.2014.58 © 2014 Phys.orgcenter_img Explore further Citation: Researchers use DNA strands to create nanobot computer inside living animal (2014, April 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-04-dna-strands-nanobot-animal.html More information: Universal computing by DNA origami robots in a living animal, Nature Nanotechnology (2014) DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2014.58AbstractBiological systems are collections of discrete molecular objects that move around and collide with each other. Cells carry out elaborate processes by precisely controlling these collisions, but developing artificial machines that can interface with and control such interactions remains a significant challenge. DNA is a natural substrate for computing and has been used to implement a diverse set of mathematical problems, logic circuits and robotics. The molecule also interfaces naturally with living systems, and different forms of DNA-based biocomputing have already been demonstrated. Here, we show that DNA origami can be used to fabricate nanoscale robots that are capable of dynamically interacting with each other in a living animal. The interactions generate logical outputs, which are relayed to switch molecular payloads on or off. As a proof of principle, we use the system to create architectures that emulate various logic gates (AND, OR, XOR, NAND, NOT, CNOT and a half adder). Following an ex vivo prototyping phase, we successfully used the DNA origami robots in living cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis) to control a molecule that targets their cells. Prior research has shown that DNA strands can be programmable, mimicking circuits and even solving simple math problems. The team in Israel has now extended that work to show that such programmability can be used inside of a living organism to perform work, such as destroying cancer cells.DNA strands can be programmed because of their natural tendency to react to different proteins. In this new effort, the team unwound DNA strands and then tied them together in an origami type box structure. The box was then “filled” with a single chemical molecule. Next, other such objects were created for the purpose of interacting with both the box structure and certain proteins found inside of the cockroach. The whole point was to create multiple scenarios in which the box would open automatically upon colliding with certain proteins. Adding multiple nanostructures allows for increasing the number of possibilities. For example, if the box structure will only open if it encounters three kinds of proteins, one made naturally by the cockroach, and two others carried by two different DNA origami structures. By mixing the combinations, it’s possible to cause the box to open using logic operations such as AND, OR, NOT (where the box will not open if a certain protein is present) etc., and that of course means that computational operations can be carried out—all inside of a living organism.In their study, the researchers filled the origami box with a chemical that binds with hemolymph molecules, which are found inside a cockroach’s version of a bloodstream. All of the injected nanobots were imbued with a fluorescent marker so that the researchers could follow their progress inside the cockroach. They report that their experiments worked as envisioned—they were able to get the box to open or not, depending on the programming of the entire fleet of nanobots sent into the insect on multiple occasions under a variety of scenarios. Cleary impressed with their own results, the team suggests that similar nanobot computers could be constructed and be ready for trial in humans in as little as five years.last_img read more

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Recreating gastronomic delights

first_img1911 restaurant at the Imperial has recreated the magnificence of the classic gourmet affair from the coronation year 1911 in their attempt to revive the flavours of the exquisite dishes which were served to the discerning lords, ladies and regal emperors back then.“This December we celebrate the era frozen in time with inspired cuisine of the coronation, while one marvels the worthies from their frames on the walls at 1911 restaurant. Doffing our hat to the good old days, our chefs bring to you the slice of the classics to mark 104th year of Delhi Durbar, tucked away in The Imperial ramparts. The preparations, I am sure will leave considerable panache with authentic ingredients, culinary style and substance,” said Vijay Wanchoo- Sr Executive VP and GM, The Imperial.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Chef Prem Kumar Pogakula, Executive Sous Chef, The Imperial, New Delhi while talking about the menu said, “The expertise of the royal kitchens, the spices, ingredients, serving style of the grand feast of the coronation and many more minute details have been understood and researched, to create an inspired menu.” Digging historic chapters, the menu features  Trifle-Trifle existed in old British era  around 1650s and was an intrinsic part of an English menu which had earlier only alcohol, bread, cream and sugar. Later it was modified with fruits and held a significant position in ceremonies.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixTrifle, amazing flambéed dessert prevailed in 1900s, which was usually kept on the table and denoted celebration like cakes, Crepe suzette, was the favourite dish of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom. It still entices palates across the globe, being one of the favourites in old English kitchens, Shepherd’s pie- one of the most famous Irish specialties in the late 19th century and also the most traditional one, normally called cottage pie. No feast was complete without it , Rhubarb pie- the pie has historic relevance in UK and is derived from the plant Rhubarb, also called Turkish rhubarb which had many medicinal qualities. It was the most famous pie in the royal kitchens in the 20th century.When: December 10-17Where: 1911, Imperiallast_img read more

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