Japanese freelance journalist missing in north

first_img to go further Follow the news on Afghanistan March 11, 2021 Find out more Organisation RSF_en AfghanistanAsia – Pacific News Help by sharing this information May 3, 2021 Find out more AfghanistanAsia – Pacific RSF asks International Criminal Court to investigate murders of journalists in Afghanistancenter_img The Japanese government has confirmed that Japanese freelance journalist Kosuke Tsuneoka has been missing since 31 March. According to Japanese news reports, he was kidnapped in a Taliban-controlled area near the northern city of Kunduz, but there has so far been no report of any group claiming his abduction.“A degree of caution is needed in this case as the abduction has not been confirmed by any independent source and it is important not to compromise any local negotiation attempts,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We appeal above all to the insurgent groups not to resort to the abduction of journalists in the areas they control. The growing danger is making it very difficult for the media to cover the war.”Aged 40, Tsuneoka is an experienced reporter who has covered armed conflicts in Chechnya and Iraq. He announced on Twitter that he was entering a Taliban-controlled area.Two French journalists employed by the French TV station France 3 and their three Afghan assistants have been held hostage in Afghanistan since 30 December.New York Times reporters Stephen Farrell and Sultan Munadi were kidnapped near Kunduz last September. Munadi died during the operation that British soldiers carried out to rescue him and Farrell.Japanese journalist Yanagida Daigen was arrested by the Taliban authorities near the Pakistani border in October 2001. Initially suspected of espionage, he was finally released from a prison in the eastern city of Jalalabad. News Receive email alerts June 2, 2021 Find out more News April 2, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Japanese freelance journalist missing in north Situation getting more critical for Afghan women journalists, report says News Afghanistan : “No just and lasting peace in Afghanistan without guarantees for press freedom”last_img read more

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California to Mortgage Servicers: Remember Duty to Struggling Homeowners

first_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Phil Hall is a former United Nations-based reporter for Fairchild Broadcast News, the author of nine books, the host of the award-winning SoundCloud podcast “The Online Movie Show,” co-host of the award-winning WAPJ-FM talk show “Nutmeg Chatter” and a writer with credits in The New York Times, New York Daily News, Hartford Courant, Wired, The Hill’s Congress Blog and Profit Confidential. His real estate finance writing has been published in the ABA Banking Journal, Secondary Marketing Executive, Servicing Management, MortgageOrb, Progress in Lending, National Mortgage Professional, Mortgage Professional America, Canadian Mortgage Professional, Mortgage Professional News, Mortgage Broker News and HousingWire. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra sent a letter to 33 mortgage servicing entities warning them that his office is monitoring their activities in regard to the state’s Homeowner Bill of Rights. He warned he will not hesitate to enact investigative and enforcement actions if they fail to “commit adequate resources to meet their legal obligations during and in the wake of the coronavirus crisis.”While Becerra’s letter offered no evidence that mortgage servicers were exploiting homeowners undergoing financial difficulties as a result of the pandemic, he nonetheless requested that the servicers provide information by August 31 for a designated contact person that would detail how they are handling coronavirus-related matters.Becerra’s letter offered an overview of the California Homeowner Bill of Rights in regard to dealing with the pre-foreclosure and foreclosure processes and how servicers must provide homeowners “a meaningful opportunity to avoid losing their home.” The letter also reminded servicers that state law provides protections to tenants in homes that are sold in foreclosure, including offering at least 90 days advance written ahead of any eviction. “As the dual economic and public health crises continue, many California homeowners may fall behind on their mortgage payments,” said Becerra in a press statement. “During times like these we must rely on laws, such as the California Homeowner Bill of Rights, to provide a safeguard for families who are one payment away from losing their homes. We take the rights of homeowners very seriously and expect all mortgage servicers to comply with the law.”Becerra’s press statement also listed his activities on behalf of homeowners and residents since the pandemic began, including is role in a coalition of 35 attorneys general that sent letters to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson and Federal Housing Finance Agency director Mark Calabria seeking additional protections for homeowners who were financially impacted by the pandemic. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago August 10, 2020 1,122 Views Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Attorney General California COVID-19 Foreclosures Homeowner Bill of Rights 2020-08-10 Christina Hughes Babb  Print This Post About Author: Phil Hall Subscribe Sign up for DS News Daily Previous: Five Star Global Expands Its Executive Team Next: Could Fears of ‘Foreclosure Tsunami’ Be Unfounded?center_img Home / Daily Dose / California to Mortgage Servicers: Remember Duty to Struggling Homeowners Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News California to Mortgage Servicers: Remember Duty to Struggling Homeowners Tagged with: Attorney General California COVID-19 Foreclosures Homeowner Bill of Rights Related Articles Share Save Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agolast_img read more

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​Nordic investors steer clear of Cayman Islands after tax blacklisting

first_imgHe added: “That does not mean that we are able to change the investments that have been made in the past and it is important to underline that we haven’t engaged in any aggressive tax planning via our investments on Cayman Islands.”The blacklisting did not change that fact, he said.“That being said, we are in dialogue with business partners about some of the investments in the jurisdiction,” said Toft.The country’s second biggest pension fund, the commercial provider PFA, took a similarly firm line when asked by IPE.“PFA has been actively involved in the EU’s blacklist on an ongoing basis,” a spokesman said, adding that it was the firm’s policy not to invest in holding companies located in countries on this list at the time of investment.“The fact that Cayman Islands is now on the list has the logical consequence that PFA will not make investments in holding companies located in the Cayman Islands as long as the Cayman Islands are listed, he said.“We are not making any new investments through Cayman Islands as long as they are on the tax haven blacklist”Hans Sterte, CIO at AlectaSweden’s largest pension fund Alecta is also taking an immediate stance on the change, according to CIO Hans Sterte.“We are not making any new investments through Cayman Islands as long as they are on the tax haven blacklist,” he said.Danish labour-market pension fund Sampension said that according to the rules it had set for itself on responsible tax practice, it distanced itself from investments in jurisdictions on the EU blacklist or those assessed by the OECD’s Global Forum on transparency and exchange of information for tax purposes as non-compliant or partially compliant.However, its rules also state that such an investment was not excluded where there was considered to be very limited risk of aggressive tax planning associated with the actual investment.In practice, Sampension said its rules meant that in future it would not make new investments in, for example, forestry funds and private equity funds domiciled in the Cayman Islands until the islands were taken off the EU list.At Danske Bank subsidiary Danica Pension, CIO Poul Kobberup said his firm looked carefully at countries on the EU’s tax blacklist.“Therefore, the addition of the Cayman Islands to the EU blacklist means that we will rethink our position on any possible future investments through the Cayman Islands,” he said, adding that the firm was focusing on making sure those investments were subject to proper and fair taxation.“The addition of the Cayman Islands to the EU blacklist means that we will rethink our position on any possible future investments through the Cayman Islands”Poul Kobberup, CIO at Danica PensionFor now, however, Danica Pension had no plans for new investments via the Cayman Islands, he said.In Norway, municipal pensions heavyweight KLP said it was now considering together with other market players how to address the issue of the blacklisting.“We have very limited exposure through the Cayman Islands, but so far we will not continue investing through this jurisdiction until we have decided how to deal with the blacklisting,” said Sissel Bjaanæs, KLP’s director of information.Norwegian pension provider DNB Liv said that in the wake of the EU announcement, it was currently working on an assessment of how this would affect current and future investments in Cayman-domiciled funds.“Our current DD [due diligence] process for all domiciles include AML [anti-money laundering] assessments and that the fund has all necessary information on all investors in the fund in this regard,” a spokesman said.DNB Liv’s ongoing internal assessment would determine if changes in this process were needed for new investments, he said, and how the firm should work with current managers to further influence their choice of domicile. The decision last week by European Union finance ministers to add the Cayman Islands along with three other countries or territories to the EU list of non-cooperative tax jurisdictions has prompted some Nordic asset owners to halt new investments made via the Caribbean tax haven.Others say they are considering what action to take, but none questioned by IPE this week said explicitly they would divest holdings through Cayman-domiciled vehicles.In Denmark, where pension funds have been keen to distance themselves from the practice of aggressive tax planning both by themselves and firms they work with, the DKK886bn (€117.6bn) pension fund ATP has said it is not investing in the Cayman Islands after the recent update of the EU blacklist.Lars Toft, tax director at ATP, said: “With Cayman Islands on the list we will not invest in the jurisdiction going forward.” Mikko Mursula, deputy CEO and CIO at IlmarinenIn Finland, pensions insurance company Varma said it is following the situation regarding the Cayman Islands and the EU’s tax haven list closely.“When it comes to our principles in general,  we require that the domiciles of funds participate in the exchange of tax information between authorities,” a spokeswoman told IPE.“Varma expects that the asset managers pay taxes in those jurisdictions in which they operate and in which the economic activity or work giving rise to the declared income is deemed to occur,” she said.Ilmarinen, Varma’s close rival, also said it was monitoring the situation.“Our goals in investments are long term goals,” said Mikko Mursula, deputy chief executive officer and chief investment officer.“Current changes of the EU list of non-cooperative tax jurisdictions do not have an immediate impact on our investment portfolio,” he said.“We monitor changes to the list. Furthermore, we consider our policies if the EU lays down consequences in the future,” he said.last_img read more

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