‘The World Nears Peak Fossil Fuels for Electricity’

first_img‘The World Nears Peak Fossil Fuels for Electricity’ Solar and Wind Prices PlummetFor every doubling in the world’s solar panels, costs fall by 26 percent, a number known as solar’s “learning rate.” Solar is a technology, not a fuel, and as such it gets cheaper and more efficient over time. This is the formula that’s driving the energy revolution. Capacity Factors Go WildOne of the fast-moving stories in renewable energy is the shift in what’s known as the capacity factor. That’s the percentage of a power plant’s maximum potential that’s actually achieved over time.Consider a wind farm. Even at high altitudes, the wind isn’t consistent and varies in strength with the time of day, weather, and the seasons. So a project that can crank out 100 megawatt hours of electricity during the windiest times might produce just 30 percent of that when averaged out over a year. That gives it a 30 percent capacity factor.As technologies continue to improve and as project designers get smarter about their placement, the capacity factors of renewables are increasing. Some wind farms in Texas are now achieving capacity factors of 50 percent, according to BNEF.  Improving capacity factors make renewables more attractive. But capacity factors of gas and coal plants are also changing. Once a solar or wind project is built, the marginal cost of the electricity it produces is pretty much zero—free electricity—while coal and gas plants require more fuel for every new watt produced. If you’re a power company with a choice, you choose the free stuff every time.As natural gas and coal plants are increasingly idled in favor of renewables, their capacity factors will take a big hit, and lifetime cost of those plants goes up. Think of them as the expensive back-up power for cheap renewables. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Tom Randall for Bloomberg News:The way we get electricity is about to change dramatically, as the era of ever-expanding demand for fossil fuels comes to an end—in less than a decade. That’s according to a new forecast by Bloomberg New Energy Finance that plots out global power markets for the next 25 years. Call it peak fossil fuels, a turnabout that’s happening not because we’re running out of coal and gas, but because we’re finding cheaper alternatives. Demand is peaking ahead of schedule because electric cars and affordable battery storage for renewable power are arriving faster than expected, as are changes in China’s energy mix.Here are eight massive shifts coming soon to power markets.There Will Be No Golden Age of GasSince 2008, the single most important force in U.S. power markets has been the abundance of cheap natural gas brought about by fracking. Cheap gas has ravaged the U.S. coal industry and inspired talk of a “bridge fuel” that moves the world from coal to renewable energy. It doesn’t look like that’s going to happen.The costs of wind and solar power are falling too quickly for gas ever to dominate on a global scale, according to BNEF. The analysts reduced their long-term forecasts for coal and natural gas prices by a third for this year’s report, but even rock-bottom prices won’t be enough to derail a rapid global transition toward renewable energy.“You can’t fight the future,” said Seb Henbest, the report’s lead author. “The economics are increasingly locked in.” The peak year for coal, gas, and oil: 2025. A New Polluter to Worry AboutChina, the biggest and fastest-growing polluter, became a major global environmental concern over the past few decades. But that perception is changing fast. China’s evolving economy and its massive shift from coal to renewables mean it will have the greatest reduction in carbon emissions of any country in the next 25 years, according to BNEF. That’s good news for the climate and is a significant change for the global energy outlook.But that leaves India, which is emerging as the biggest threat to efforts to curb climate change. India’s electricity demand is expected to increase fourfold by 2040, and the country will need to invest in a variety of energy sources to meet this overwhelming new demand. India has hundreds of millions of people with little or no access to electricity, and the country sits atop a mountain of coal. It intends to use it. Renewables Attract $7.8 TrillionHumanity’s demand for electricity is still rising, and investments in fossil fuels will add up to $2.1 trillion through 2040. But that will be dwarfed by $7.8 trillion invested in renewables, including $3.4 trillion for solar, $3.1 trillion for wind, and $911 billion for hydro power.Already, in many regions, the lifetime cost of wind and solar is less than the cost of building new fossil fuel plants, and that trend will continue. But by 2027, something remarkable happens. At that point, building new wind farms and solar fields will often be cheaper than running the existing coal and gas generators. “This is a tipping point that results in rapid and widespread renewables development,” according to BNEF.By 2028, batteries will be as ubiquitous as rooftop solar is today. Batteries Join the GridRenewable energy and electric cars create a virtuous cycle of demand growth. Unlike fossil fuels—where a surge of demand leads to higher prices—with new energy technologies more demand begets more scale, and that drives prices lower.The scale-up of electric cars increases demand for renewable energy and drives down the cost of batteries. And as those costs fall, batteries can increasingly be used to store solar power. Electric Cars Rescue Power MarketsIn this discussion of peak fossil fuels, the focus is on electricity generation, not transportation fuels. For cars, peak oil demand will take a bit more time. But the sudden rise of electric cars is on the verge of disrupting oil markets as well, and that has profound implications for electricity markets as more cars plug in.In fact, electric cars couldn’t come at a better time for developed economies. Take Germany, where increases in efficiency mean that without electric cars, demand for electricity would be headed toward a prolonged and destabilizing decline. Electric vehicles will reverse that trend, according to BNEF.The adoption of electric cars will vary by country and continent, but overall they’ll add 8 percent to humanity’s total electricity use by 2040, BNEF found. The Transformation ContinuesBNEF’s outlook for carbon dioxide emissions has improved significantly over the past year, in spite of cheap fossil fuel prices. The shift to renewables is happening shockingly fast—but not fast enough to prevent perilous levels of global warming.Without additional policy action by governments, global carbon dioxide emissions from the power sector will peak in the 2020s and remain relatively flat for the the foreseeable future. That’s not enough to prevent the surface of the Earth from heating more than 2 degrees Celsius, according to BNEF. That’s considered the point of no return for some of the worst consequences of climate change.BNEF’s report focuses on fundamental economics: price, demand, supply. It includes climate-related policies that have already been set into action but doesn’t make any guesses for new policies beyond those. It also doesn’t include any jumps in technology that aren’t clearly already under way.That could be heartening for people concerned about climate change, because if there’s one thing that energy markets have shown in the past decade, it’s that there will be more surprises to come.Full article (with charts): The World Nears Peak Fossil Fuels for Electricitylast_img read more

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​Nordic investors steer clear of Cayman Islands after tax blacklisting

first_imgHe added: “That does not mean that we are able to change the investments that have been made in the past and it is important to underline that we haven’t engaged in any aggressive tax planning via our investments on Cayman Islands.”The blacklisting did not change that fact, he said.“That being said, we are in dialogue with business partners about some of the investments in the jurisdiction,” said Toft.The country’s second biggest pension fund, the commercial provider PFA, took a similarly firm line when asked by IPE.“PFA has been actively involved in the EU’s blacklist on an ongoing basis,” a spokesman said, adding that it was the firm’s policy not to invest in holding companies located in countries on this list at the time of investment.“The fact that Cayman Islands is now on the list has the logical consequence that PFA will not make investments in holding companies located in the Cayman Islands as long as the Cayman Islands are listed, he said.“We are not making any new investments through Cayman Islands as long as they are on the tax haven blacklist”Hans Sterte, CIO at AlectaSweden’s largest pension fund Alecta is also taking an immediate stance on the change, according to CIO Hans Sterte.“We are not making any new investments through Cayman Islands as long as they are on the tax haven blacklist,” he said.Danish labour-market pension fund Sampension said that according to the rules it had set for itself on responsible tax practice, it distanced itself from investments in jurisdictions on the EU blacklist or those assessed by the OECD’s Global Forum on transparency and exchange of information for tax purposes as non-compliant or partially compliant.However, its rules also state that such an investment was not excluded where there was considered to be very limited risk of aggressive tax planning associated with the actual investment.In practice, Sampension said its rules meant that in future it would not make new investments in, for example, forestry funds and private equity funds domiciled in the Cayman Islands until the islands were taken off the EU list.At Danske Bank subsidiary Danica Pension, CIO Poul Kobberup said his firm looked carefully at countries on the EU’s tax blacklist.“Therefore, the addition of the Cayman Islands to the EU blacklist means that we will rethink our position on any possible future investments through the Cayman Islands,” he said, adding that the firm was focusing on making sure those investments were subject to proper and fair taxation.“The addition of the Cayman Islands to the EU blacklist means that we will rethink our position on any possible future investments through the Cayman Islands”Poul Kobberup, CIO at Danica PensionFor now, however, Danica Pension had no plans for new investments via the Cayman Islands, he said.In Norway, municipal pensions heavyweight KLP said it was now considering together with other market players how to address the issue of the blacklisting.“We have very limited exposure through the Cayman Islands, but so far we will not continue investing through this jurisdiction until we have decided how to deal with the blacklisting,” said Sissel Bjaanæs, KLP’s director of information.Norwegian pension provider DNB Liv said that in the wake of the EU announcement, it was currently working on an assessment of how this would affect current and future investments in Cayman-domiciled funds.“Our current DD [due diligence] process for all domiciles include AML [anti-money laundering] assessments and that the fund has all necessary information on all investors in the fund in this regard,” a spokesman said.DNB Liv’s ongoing internal assessment would determine if changes in this process were needed for new investments, he said, and how the firm should work with current managers to further influence their choice of domicile. The decision last week by European Union finance ministers to add the Cayman Islands along with three other countries or territories to the EU list of non-cooperative tax jurisdictions has prompted some Nordic asset owners to halt new investments made via the Caribbean tax haven.Others say they are considering what action to take, but none questioned by IPE this week said explicitly they would divest holdings through Cayman-domiciled vehicles.In Denmark, where pension funds have been keen to distance themselves from the practice of aggressive tax planning both by themselves and firms they work with, the DKK886bn (€117.6bn) pension fund ATP has said it is not investing in the Cayman Islands after the recent update of the EU blacklist.Lars Toft, tax director at ATP, said: “With Cayman Islands on the list we will not invest in the jurisdiction going forward.” Mikko Mursula, deputy CEO and CIO at IlmarinenIn Finland, pensions insurance company Varma said it is following the situation regarding the Cayman Islands and the EU’s tax haven list closely.“When it comes to our principles in general,  we require that the domiciles of funds participate in the exchange of tax information between authorities,” a spokeswoman told IPE.“Varma expects that the asset managers pay taxes in those jurisdictions in which they operate and in which the economic activity or work giving rise to the declared income is deemed to occur,” she said.Ilmarinen, Varma’s close rival, also said it was monitoring the situation.“Our goals in investments are long term goals,” said Mikko Mursula, deputy chief executive officer and chief investment officer.“Current changes of the EU list of non-cooperative tax jurisdictions do not have an immediate impact on our investment portfolio,” he said.“We monitor changes to the list. Furthermore, we consider our policies if the EU lays down consequences in the future,” he said.last_img read more

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Brendan Curry’s overtime winner lifts No. 12 Syracuse over No. 2 Duke, 9-8

first_imgSU won the ensuing faceoff. Desko took a timeout and with no shot clock, Curry took the ball and paced across the top of the alley before flying down the right side and whipping a shot off the pipe. For a second, it felt like the Orange’s third-straight comeback was not to be completed. Curry had missed 11-straight and Duke’s stout defense surely allowed the best remaining chance. The Blue Devils’ offense only needed one shot. Instead, Syracuse kept attacking and Curry kept shooting. His first goal all afternoon secured SU’s biggest win of the year and kept ACC title hopes alive. CICERO — Syracuse midfielder Brendan Curry took 11 shots and missed all of them.His 11th, with less than 15 seconds left in regulation of an 8-8 tie, whizzed from his right side across the face of Duke goalie Turner Uppgren, zipping off the corner where the crossbar and opposite post meet. As the white rubber ball careened skyward, Curry looked back, half raising his arms in exasperation. Published on March 24, 2019 at 4:15 pm Contact Andrew: [email protected] | @A_E_Graham Commentscenter_img AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBut working on the goal line to Uppgren’s right a few minutes later in overtime, Curry pushed toward the crease, jumped, raised his stick and pushed the ball into the net. The roughly 5,000 fans at Bregman Stadium erupted into a frenzy as Curry’s orange and white clad teammates mobbed him.“It did get tough towards the end, like, ‘C’mon,’” Curry said, “but Nate found me and luckily I buried it.” Curry said.Curry’s lone goal Sunday, an overtime winner on his 12th shot, dispatched No. 2 Duke (8-2, 0-1 Atlantic Coast) 9-8 at Cicero-North Syracuse High School and kept No. 12 Syracuse (5-2, 1-1) alive in the ACC. Despite scoring only three goals through the first 51-plus minutes, the Orange burst to life in the final seven and a half, scoring six of the last seven goals to force overtime and win.Prior to this season, since joining the conference in 2013, the Orange were 14-5 against the ACC in the regular season. In the two seasons prior to 2019, Syracuse went a perfect 8-0 in the regular season ACC play. In a conference of five teams, even one loss can prevent a regular season title. A 15-14 loss to Virginia in overtime in February effectively eliminated SU’s margin for error in its conference slate.In the past two games, the Orange have gone down early, made runs and provided fourth-quarter heroics to sneak away with wins. SU has erased four goal deficits the past two weeks against Johns Hopkins and Rutgers, respectively. Earlier this week, players and John Desko warned against digging the same hole against Duke. The No. 2 team in the country wouldn’t afford the same opportunities to come back. The Blue Devils defense was too good, their offense too relentless to play from behind. But at halftime on Sunday, it was a similar scene. Duke’s bench happily marched to the locker room, a 6-2 lead in hand and a man-up to start the second half while the Orange slogged off the field. The Blue Devils were on a 3-0 run and SU didn’t score again until Jamie Trimboli snuck a shot past Uppgren in the third quarter, after a nearly 29-minute SU drought.“In general I thought it was a bit of a sloppy game,” Desko said. “But then we came alive when we needed to.”Susie Teuscher | Digital Design EditorDuke cobbled together its own offense while burying Syracuse’s. Quickly, the Blue Devils ran out to a 3-0 lead, leaning on star defenders Cade Van Raaphorst and JT Giles-Harris to lock off SU’s attacks and generate turnovers.All through the first half, whenever the Orange worked the ball inside — to Bradley Voigt, Nate Solomon or Stephen Rehfuss — a stick or body came thrashing, knocking the ball free and jump-starting Duke’s offense. Despite outshooting the Blue Devils 20-19 in the first half, the Orange’s quality chances were rare. Through most of the game, the best consistent look SU’s offense generated were outside shots from Curry on alley dodges — his shots that weren’t easily saved sailed over the cageOut of halftime, the game slowed to a crawl. Syracuse scored the only goal of the third quarter. Holding possession, leading 8-4 with about six minutes remaining in the game, it seemed the Blue Devils were happy to sit on their lead and constrict SU out of the game. Then Syracuse parlayed a Duke penalty with 6:19 remaining into a man-up goal 33 seconds later to make it 8-5. A Van Raaphorst push with 4:12 left was punished by Voigt to make it 8-6. A turnover less than a minute later and SU trailed by one with 3:15 to play. All the while, Desko said, the Orange adjusted to stay away from the crease — a vortex where the Orange coughed up possession all game — and create more space to facilitate offense. “We cleaned out the crease and just had one player in there and that probably changed their slide package,” Desko said. “In a hot game like this, when you do that, the defense has to adjust and it takes a little time.Hunting a tie, the Orange’s offense worked, sending the ball deftly from stick to stick until Rehfuss leaked out to the left of Uppgren. After the game, Rehfuss said he noticed the space and his defender slouching off so he naturally drifted. Nate Solomon found him with a pass and Rehfuss lowered his stick to shoulder level, picking the upper-right corner — Uppgren’s weak side — sending the packed bleachers into hysterics. Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Medeama beat Ashgold to emerge Super Cup champions

first_imgMedaema SC, the MTN FAC Cup Champions edged Ashanti Gold FC, the league champions by a goal to nil to emerge the champion of champions of Ghana.Medeama made their intentions clear right from the blast of the referee’s whistle, but Ashgold soaked the pressure and capitalized on a counter break however, Isaac Amoah’s effort went wayward.Akwasi Donsu’s freekick in the 15th minute was fixed to the torch line by Black Stars goalkeeper Fatau Dauda to give the Miners a big sigh of relieves. Donsu was a big threat to Miners throughout the game, but Fatau Dauda on the day was the best player on the Ashgold set-up as his fantastic saves denied the likes of Donsu, Benjamin Bature,etc a goal in the first half.Ashgold on couple of occasions also created some decent chances, but  Isaac Amoah, Tijani Joshua wasted the opportunities that were presented to them.Emmanuel Osei Baffour nearly gave Ashgold the match opener, but his effort missed the goal post by some few inches to bring the first half to a close.Medeama resumed the 2nd half of the game by taking the game to Ashgold like they did in the early minutes of the first half. Ashgold managed to coil the attacking threats of the Tarkwa based. The tempo of the 2 half low as both sides failed to play much pressing game that could have put pressure on the goalkeepers.Kadiri Mohammed had the most glorious opportunity to hit the back of the net, after Hudu Yakubu’s corner kick found his head in an unmarked position, but his header missed the post.Medeama responded by putting together a fast counter attacking play that finally fell the way of Benjamin Bature, their leading attacker. However he shot wide to create no problem for Fatau Dauda in post.Muntari Tagoe acrobatically saved Joseph Atto Bissah’s bicycle kick in the 80th minute, before Frederick Quayson slotted in the rebound from an offside position and referee Daniel Laryea made the right call by disallowing the goal.Bernard Ofori fetched Medeama the lone goal in the 87th minute when he scored from a deflected ball that came his way in a seemly offside position. However, the centre referee saw it differently by making the goal stand. –Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @JoyFMSports. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more

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Week 4 Fantasy Rankings: RB

first_imgWEEK 4 NON-PPR RANKINGS:Quarterback | Wide receiver | Tight end | D/ST | KickerWeek 4 features just two teams on byes: Jets and 49ers. At the running back spot, the Jets’ bye is a big one because it means an owner is without Le’Veon Bell this week. There will also be owners dealing with the absence of Matt Breida, Raheem Mostert or even Jeff Wilson, Jr., but they might just be glad to get that headache off their plate for a week. WEEK 4 PPR RANKINGS: Running back | Wide receiver | Tight endFurther down the rankings, we see Devonta Freeman (vs. Titans) make an appearance as an RB2. Once Ito Smith left Sunday with a concussion, Freeman received all the RB carries and only ceded one total touch to another back. Seattle’s Chris Carson (@ Cardinals) has tumbled in this week’s rankings despite a good matchup with the Cardinals because Carson has lost a fumble in all three games so far this season. If Rashaad Penny is healthy enough to play, expect Carson to lose out on some touches.In Philly, we saw a near-breakout game for Miles Sanders in Week 3, as he averaged 4.1 yards on 13 carries and picked up 73 yards on two big plays in the passing game. He’s a rookie back on the rise. In Chicago, David Montgomery finally looks like he’s won Matt Nagy’s trust and should be a fantasy starter on most rosters in Week 4.WEEK 4 DFS LINEUPS:DK cash | DK GPP | FD cash | FD GPP | Y! cash | Y! GPPFinally, there’s a very interesting matchup clash in Week 4: Dalvin Cook against the imposing Bears defense. Cook has rushed for more than 100 yards in all three Vikings games, carrying the ball at least 16 times each time out. The Minnesota offense goes through Cook. Even with that matchup, you’ve gotta keep Cook in your lineup this week because he’ll still get the volume even if the efficiency drops slightly. Besides, all it takes is one, like the 75-yard touchdown Cook ran for in Week 2.WEEK 4: Waiver pickups | FAAB planner | Trade values | Snap countsReminder: These rankings will be adjusted throughout week, so check back often for the latest updates and analysis!MORE WEEK 4 DFS: Top values | Stacks | Lineup Builder LISTEN TO THE SN FANTASY WEEK 4 PREVIEW PODCAST BELOWWeek 4 Fantasy RB RankingsThese rankings are for standard, non-PPR leagues.1Christian McCaffrey, CAR @ HOU.2Ezekiel Elliott, DAL @ NO.3Austin Ekeler, LAC @ MIA. To the shock of no one, Miami allows the most fantasy points to running backs. In Week 3, two Cowboys running backs reached 100 yards on the ground against the Dolphins. Ekeler’s floor-ceiling combination in this game is as good as any back for Week 4.4Alvin Kamara, NO vs. DAL.5James Conner, PIT vs. CIN. The Bengals have been burned on the ground all season long, so even though Conner has been poor this season, this Monday Night Football matchup shapes up as a prime game for him to break out and return to his 2018 form. Cincinnati’s allowed 5.2 yards per carry to running backs in 2019, so at Conner’s usual workload, his yardage alone provides a high floor in Week 4.6Mark Ingram, BAL vs. CLE.7Marlon Mack, IND vs. OAK. The Raiders haven’t stopped much of anything from offenses the past two weeks, so this game shapes up as one that Indianapolis gets an early lead and uses Mack to control the game in the second half. It doesn’t hurt that Mack’s averaging a career-best 4.9 yards per carry so far in 2019. 8Josh Jacobs, OAK @ IND.9Derrick Henry, TEN @ ATL.10Nick Chubb, CLE @ BAL. The Ravens have been good at stopping the run this season, but Chubb has proven to be Cleveland’s most consistent offense in the early going. In an important divisional matchup for the Browns, expect them to lean on Chubb early and often as Baker Mayfield continues to work through his early-season struggles.11Kerryon Johnson, DET vs. KC.12Joe Mixon, CIN @ PIT. This will be a friendly game to running backs, as Pittsburgh’s also struggled to limit running back fantasy points. The Steelers have been especially burned by backs catching passes, which Mixon is good at, so he’s in line for a solid Monday night.13David Johnson, ARZ vs. SEA.14Phillip Lindsay, DEN vs. JAX. Lindsay’s biggest concern in a time share with Royce Freeman might’ve been expected to be goal-line work, as Freeman is the more physically imposing back. No worries there anymore, though, as Lindsay scored two goal-line touchdowns for Denver in Week 3. While Freeman has played a solid role, too, Lindsay is still the preferred option in the Denver backfield.15Dalvin Cook, MIN @ CHI. You can’t really sit Cook this week. He’s received at least 16 carries and topped 100 yards in each of the season’s first three weeks. Minnesota won’t abandon the running game, so Cook should get a similar carry total. Even if it’s more like 20 carries for 80 yards, all it takes is one score to make it a solid fantasy day.16Todd Gurley, LAR vs. TB.17Leonard Fournette, JAX @ DEN. Maybe the nature of Fournette’s Week 3 concerned you: Negative yardage until he broke a late run to get him over 60 yards for the night. Denver’s allowed a league-worst five rushing TDs to running backs in 2019, though. Fournette should be licking his chops when the Jags get down near the goal line, and his added work in the receiving game gives him a slightly higher floor, especially in PPR leagues.18Aaron Jones, GB vs. PHI.19David Montgomery, CHI vs. MIN.20Devonta Freeman, ATL vs. TEN. Ito Smith looks iffy due to a concussion, and if Smith misses out, Freeman should get 90-plus percent of the Falcons’ backfield touches. After a week in which Freeman finally looked more like himself, his high Week 4 usage makes him a good RB2. 21Sony Michel, NE @ BUF.22LeSean McCoy, KC @ DET. McCoy aggravated the ankle injury he dealt with last week late in Sunday’s game. Detroit is a fantasy-friendly matchup for running backs, so keep an eye on this one: If McCoy plays, you’ll want him in your lineup.23Adrian Peterson,WAS @ NYG. 24Chris Carson, SEA @ ARZ. Carson has lost a fumble in all three games this season. If Rashaad Penny (hamstring) is healthy in time for Sunday’s game, Carson becomes a risky play even in a good matchup because he’s very close to being in Pete Carroll’s doghouse regardless of how many “votes of confidence” he gets.25Royce Freeman, DEN vs. JAX26Miles Sanders, PHI @ GB. Sanders had a mini breakout in Week 3, leading Eagles backs in rushing and receiving yards. A matchup with a Packers run defense that’s allowed 5.0 yards per carry to backs might be just what the rookie from Penn State needs to have his full breakout.27Wayne Gallman, NYG vs. WAS. Gallman will fill in for Saquon Barkley (ankle) as long as the superstar is out, and he gets a friendly first matchup against the Redskins. Gallman has averaged 4.2 yards per carry in the six NFL games he has of at least 10 carries, so if the Giants trust him with 15 or so totes, he could put together a decent ballgame. He’s only shown himself as a solid pass-catcher out of the backfield in limited opportunities. 28Rashaad Penny, SEA @ ARZ29Carlos Hyde, HOU vs. CAR30Devin Singletary, BUF vs. NE31Peyton Barber, TB @ LAR32James White, NE @ BUF. The Bills have limited receiving for running backs so far this season, but they have allowed two touchdown receptions by backs. In standard leagues, White owners will need him to find paydirt to make starting him worthwhile, but at least it looks like there’s a chance of that in this matchup.33Darrel Williams, KC @ DET.34Jordan Howard, PHI @ GB35Ronald Jones, TB @ LAR. Jones finished Week 3 with a late surge to outcarry Peyton Barber, 14-13 and outgain him on the ground, 80-48. This remains a guessing-game committee, and the Rams are a tough matchup. It’s hard to trust either Tampa Bay option this week as anything more than a FLEX flier.36Jamaal Williams, GB vs. PHI.37Chris Thompson, WAS @ NYG.38Tarik Cohen, CHI vs. MIN39Kenyan Drake, MIA vs. LAC. Game flow hasn’t even helped Drake in the early going as Miami’s preferred receiving back, as neither Ryan Fitzpatrick nor Josh Rosen check down enough to let Drake compile fantasy points through the air. Maybe Drake really will get traded soon. It could only help his value.40Frank Gore, BUF vs. NE41Duke Johnson Jr., HOU vs. CAR42Nyheim Hines, IND vs. OAK43Dion Lewis, TEN @ ATL44Rex Burkhead, NE @ BUF.45Latavius Murray, NO vs. DAL46Ito Smith, ATL vs. TEN47Gus Edwards, BAL vs. CLE48Malcolm Brown, LAR vs. TB.49Alexander Mattison, MIN @ CHI50Melvin Gordon, LAC @ MIA. Gordon could play a limited role Sunday now that Justin Jackson is out. If you’re desperate and he’s active, he could score a touchdown against a bad defense. 51Kalen Ballage, MIA vs. LAC52Tony Pollard, DAL @ NO.53DeAndre Washington, OAK @ IND.54Giovani Bernard, CIN @ PIT55C.J. Prosise, SEA @ ARZ. The biggest change to our running back rankings comes right at the top: There’s no Saquon Barkley. He sustained a high-ankle sprain in Week 3 and almost surely won’t be ready to go in Week 4. Fantasy football owners who drafted Barkley with one of the top two or three picks in their drafts might be scrambling to try and find a replacement on the waiver wire, be that handcuff Wayne Gallman or someone else. Chances are, the sleeper you need to make up for Barkley’s absence might already be on your bench, a player you’ve never considered playing yet because you have Saquon, but now will be forced into using. Hopefully our Week 4 fantasy RB rankings help you uncover the hidden gem you have hiding on your own roster.One player who isn’t a sleeper anymore is Austin Ekeler. He’s just a full-blown fantasy stud who picks up points on the ground and in the receiving game. Ekeler gets the mouthwatering matchup with Miami in Week 4. The Dolphins allowed 100-yard games to both Ezekiel Elliott and Tony Pollard in Week 3, so there should be plenty of yardage to go around for the Chargers — enough to make Justin Jackson an interesting deep-league play, especially with bye weeks here. (Update: Jackson has been ruled out. If you still want to play the backup game for the Chargers, you’d have to go with Troymaine Pope.)last_img read more

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Photos: Ohio State Groom Marries Michigan Bride In The Big House

first_imgOhio State fans holding Go Bucks signs during a football game.INDIANAPOLIS, IN – DECEMBER 02: Fans of the Ohio State Buckeyes cheer as they take on the Wisconsin Badgers during the Big Ten Championship game at Lucas Oil Stadium on December 2, 2017 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)How many die-hard Ohio State football fans have gotten married at Michigan’s Big House? Well, at least one. ESPN is reporting that Mike and Stephanie Stout got hitched recently and held their reception at the Wolverines’ football stadium, despite the obvious rivalry between the two fan bases. While it would appear that Stephanie won the overall argument, Mike certainly did all he could to make the wedding feature both schools.The photos, produced by E. C. Campbell Photography, show Mike spelling out O-H-I-O in Michigan’s tunnel. He also had his groomsmen wear Ohio State socks and grey tuxedos. Finally, there were Buckeyes koozies and pom-poms for each guest.When an Ohio State groom marries a Michigan bride and the reception is at the Big House … [Credit: E.C. Campbell Photography]A photo posted by espn (@espn) on Jul 31, 2015 at 8:08am PDT(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));A fun feature on ESPN today. 🙂 #lovewinsPosted by E.C. Campbell Photography on Friday, July 31, 2015(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));What happens when a Buckeye fan falls in love with a Wolverine fan? Check out Mike and Stephanie’s wedding day to find…Posted by E.C. Campbell Photography on Thursday, July 30, 2015You can check out all of the photos over at the photographer’s website. Ohio State fans – is this acceptable?last_img read more

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Chinese Banks New Source of Capital for Shipping

first_imgzoom Chinese banks seem to be the emerging power when it comes to securing capital for the shipping industry.The market has been dominated by European lenders which are starting to turn to a more localized strategy as they work to trim down their exposure to bad shipping loans.This is in particular seen in Germany, whose banks have sustained a considerable blow from nonperforming loans from the sector.For example in June this year, German Commerzbank returned its regulatory licence to conduct business concerning ship Pfandbriefe as part of its plan to dispose of bad shipping loans worth EUR 4.5 billion.However, Chinese financial institutions might be replacing the German capital on the market.“Chinese banks are increasingly doing transactions globally, and it has become a trend. When someone leaves the scene, there is a gap, and it will soon be filled with different banks,” Joep Gorgels, Regional Head Scandinavia ECT Energy & Transportation – ABN AMRO Bank said while speaking at Marine Services & Offshore Forum in London.As explained by Bill Guo, Executive Director of Beijing-based ICBC Leasing, since many ships are being built in China, especially those intended for export, there has been a great demand to push the banks to finance those ships.The demand also comes from the local shipyards, capable of building massive ships, such as those 22,000 TEU ULCVs recently ordered by CMA CGM at CSSC yards.According to Guo, both Chinese export and import banks and local leasing companies are interested in providing financing to such projects as the return is stable and the risk is reduced.In addition, ICBC is looking beyond local boundaries, as 80 % of its business comes outside of China, with the majority of customers from that percentage being from Europe.The availability of funding for shipowners, which has already been scarce, is becoming ever more restricted and further threatened by the pressure from regulators, in Europe in particular.As pointed out during the panel, the advantage of the Chinese lessors is that they offer cheaper capital and are more flexible than their European or American counterparts, which is very much appreciated in the industry.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Clashing clauses

first_imgA legal battle has convened between PepsiCo India and Gujarat farmers over the latter’s alleged use of a variety of potato – FL 2027, also called FC5 – on which PepsiCo claimed exclusive rights by virtue of a Plant Variety Certificate (PVC) under the Protection of Plant Varieties and Farmers’ Rights (PPV&FR) Act, 2001. While PepsiCo claims infringement of intellectual property rights by Gujarat farmers over the growing of potato variety used in its Lay’s chips, slapping a lawsuit of ₹1.05 crore each as damages, farmer groups have launched a campaign calling for government intervention. The farmer groups accompanied by civil society representatives have unanimously asserted that the law (PPV&FR) allows them to grow and sell any variety of crop or even seed as long as they don’t sell branded seed of registered varieties. Hence, framing their claims as “untenable”, they have demanded the withdrawal of all cases initiated against farmers by PepsiCo India. Both parties to the legal dispute forwarding their arguments based on the same law (PPV&FR) piques curiosity. While PepsiCo India has highlighted Section 64 of the PPV&FR Act, 2001 to claim infringement of its rights, farmer groups cite Section 39 of the same Act, which specifically says that a farmer is allowed “to save, use, sow, resow, exchange, share or sell his farm produce including seed of a variety protected under this Act” so long as he does not sell “branded seed”. While the Ahmedabad commercial court gave PepsiCo the benefit of the doubt by restraining farmers from growing the specific variety, it also appointed a commissioner to prepare an inventory, take samples and send them to a government lab for analysis. Though PepsiCo has already conducted a lab assessment based on sample recovered by private detective company it hired to pose as customers in front of the farmers. So the court proceeding scheduled for today will predominantly have to decide on whether section 39 trumps section 64 of the same Act or not. PepsiCo already works with a large number of potato farmers to grow potato besides being the biggest buyer of chip-grade potato in the country. Apprehensions of a threat to its monopoly in the chip-grade potato market are therefore evident through the lawsuit initiated against the Gujarat farmers.last_img read more

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Four underclassmen sign contracts to play in MLB

Former OSU first baseman Jacob Bosiokovic at bat versus Wright State on June 5. Courtesy: OSU AthleticsLast week at the 2016 MLB First-Year Player Draft, six Ohio State players were selected — the most since six were taken in the 1998 draft.One week later, it has been confirmed that all six of those Buckeyes will play professional baseball. OSU coach Greg Beals told The Lantern that each former OSU player has signed an MLB contract, which includes four underclassmen.The Buckeyes were set to lose nine seniors from the 2016 group that won a Big Ten tournament championship. With outfielders Ronnie Dawson and Troy Montgomery, first baseman Jacob Bosiokovic and starting pitcher Tanner Tully all signing with a year of eligibility left, the Buckeyes will now have to replace six of their starting nine hitters as well as two members of their starting rotation.The first player drafted for the Buckeyes was Dawson, who was taken in the second round with the 61st overall pick by the Houston Astros. According to MLB.com’s Brian McTaggart, he signed a deal with a bonus of $1,056,800.Montgomery was drafted 246th overall in the eighth round by the Los Angeles Angels. His bonus was worth $150,000.In the 19th round of the draft, the Colorado Rockies selected Bosiokovic. The 560th pick in the draft was signed with a bonus of $40,000. He flew out Monday to join the Rockies short-season single-A affiliate, the Boise Hawks.“I really didn’t know (I would be drafted) until I had spoken with (the Rockies) after the second day of the draft,” Bosiokovic said. “They were asking me what my signability was, but I really didn’t know what was going to happen until I got the phone call from our area scout.”Left-handed reliever Michael Horejsei was also selected in the draft, taken in the 21st round with the 626th overall pick, but it is unknown at this time how much he signed for. According to Baseball America, the slot value for his place in the draft is $100,000.Co-captain and third baseman Nick Sergakis was taken later in the 23rd round of the draft with the 700th pick in the draft and signed with the New York Mets for a bonus of $5,000. The final Buckeye taken in the draft was left-handed ace Tanner Tully, who signed with the Indians on a $100,000 bonus after being selected in the 26th round with the 782nd overall pick. read more

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Ohio StateMichigan rivalry moves to outdoor ice rink come January

Growing up, Ohio State men’s hockey coach Mark Osiecki would play outdoor hockey regularly. He would gather with neighborhood kids at a local pond and play pick-up games, and even play outside with his high school team. “Eventually, you moved indoor and played in the rink,” Osiecki said. “But, even our high school team, we practiced outside once a week.” On Jan. 15, the OSU men’s hockey team will get to experience the type of hockey its head coach grew up playing, as the No. 9 Buckeyes will face No. 11 Michigan in Ohio’s first outdoor college hockey game. The game, billed as the “Frozen Diamond Faceoff,” will be played at Progressive Field, home of the Cleveland Indians, in Cleveland, Ohio. Playing outdoors is something that most OSU players haven’t done, Osiecki said. “These kids, none of them played outdoor hockey, so they don’t really understand,” he said. “You want that feeling of kids that don’t want to leave the ice.” One of the few Buckeyes who have played outdoor hockey is sophomore forward Alex Lippincott, who said it’s the best way to play the game. “That’s the fun of the game, playing with your buddies outside,” he said. “There’s nothing better than outdoor hockey. It’s the most fun and the best way to enjoy the game.” OSU first played in an outdoor game on Feb. 11, 2006, at Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wisc. The Buckeyes faced off against Wisconsin in the “Frozen Tundra Hockey Classic” in front of 40,890 fans. Osiecki was an assistant coach for the Badgers at the time, and OSU lost, 4-2. Michigan played Michigan State last December in “The Big Chill at the Big House,” when more than 100,000 fans watched the Wolverines defeat the Spartans, 5-0, at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor. The game set a world hockey record with an official attendance of 113,411. Even though the game is almost two months away, the Buckeyes are already excited. “There is a lot of buzz, and there should be,” Osiecki said. “It’s a unique situation, that our players, our fans, the state … will never forget.” Lippincott said his excitement for the game stems from watching the Winter Classic every year, an annual NHL outdoor game played on New Year’s Day, and also because the game is being played at the home of his favorite professional sports team. “When we first heard it was a possibility, I was real excited,” he said. “That’s my favorite sports team, the Indians. It’s a great feeling to be able to play (at Progressive Field).” The fact that the game will be played against rival Michigan adds to the hype of the game for some OSU players. The Buckeye-Wolverine hockey rivalry might not be on the same level as the football rivalry, but with recent OSU hockey uniform changes, the game will look similar to ones played on the gridiron. OSU has new uniforms this season that include a helmet barring similar resemblance to the silver-striped headgear worn by Buckeye football players. “It will probably look like a football game out there,” senior forward Danny Dries said. Osiecki said the uniform change was made, in part, after seeing Michigan’s winged-shaped hockey lids, which resemble the helmets worn by the Wolverine football team. “When they walk in an arena anywhere, people know who they are. It’s Michigan,” he said. “I thought it was a great idea from them whenever they started it.” The Jan. 15 game could also have great importance concerning the CCHA. The No. 9 Buckeyes, 10-3-1 on the year, moved into first place in the CCHA with a 7-2-1-1 conference record after beating Michigan in back-to-back games last weekend. The series sweep was the first for OSU in Ann Arbor since 1986. Michigan is currently tied for seventh in the CCHA with a 3-5-2-1-conference record. The No. 11 Wolverines are 7-5-2 overall this season. The Buckeyes will face Michigan in Columbus at 7:35 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13 and then travel to Cleveland to play at Progressive Field at 5:05 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15 in what will be a home CCHA game for OSU. read more

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