Lower TFAs in margarine

first_imgBakeMark UK (Wirral, Merseyside) supplies a wide range of non-hydrogenated fats and margarines. These enable food manufacturers to develop baked goods containing lower levels of trans fatty acids (TFAs), says the company. Consumer awareness of the potential health benefits of cutting TFA consumption is driving current demand, adds the firm.Healthier alternativeThe Craigmillar non-hydrogenated range offers a healthier alternative to trans fats, with multi-purpose fats and margarines suitable for all types of pastry production, says BakeMark.For sweet, savoury and cold short pastry, high performance Non-Hydro Marvello from the Premium Plus range provides a smooth, baked-through butter-like flavour, says the company. Non-Hydro Skyhigh is an all-purpose pastry margarine ideally suited to sweet or savoury applications. Available from the Performance Fats range, Skyhigh has good lift and is tolerant to temperature extremes. Non-Hydro Flakit is a consistent margarine, yellow in colour, with good plasticity. It is simple to use in both hot and cold conditions and is suitable for a ‘better-for-you’ treat, such as croissants, brioches and Danish pastries, says BakeMark.last_img read more

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JBS proves a point

first_imgJBS Process Engineering (Market Deeping, Peterborough) has designed a prover and cooler to meet the needs of a high-volume doughnut producer. The prover is synchronised with an upstream sheeting line, and a gentle turnover system has been created to feed directly onto the fryer infeed conveyor. The ambient cascade cooler is located in an air-conditioned room and features a specially developed driven turnaround to each individual deck, to ensure gentle, damage-free transfer of the product from tier to tier.last_img

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Bakers and franchising

first_imgFew bakers in the UK run a franchising operation and those that do, such as Wm Stephens in Scotland, Muffin Break, BB’s Coffee and Muffins and the various pasty franchises, are in a small minority.In January 2006, Euromonitor International reported that the ’bakery products fast food’ category, which includes sandwich chains Subway and Quiznos as well as Krispy Kreme, witnessed value growth of nearly 5% between 2003-04 in the US, whereas the burger and chicken fast food sectors showed only 1.6% and 2.8% value growth, respectively.”The high growth achieved by bakery fast food is even more remarkable considering that it is the second-largest fast food sector, following only burger restaurants,” it said. The most compelling reason for this was the ability to easily open new outlets. So, is there an untapped opportunity for bakers to go into franchising in the UK?”There have been bakeries that have tried franchising but it has never really taken off,” says Chris Dabner, parliamentary officer for the National Association of Master Bakers (NA). But with modern bake-off techniques it would be more feasible, he notes; all you’d have to provide would be a bake-off oven and product could be delivered frozen, if production and distribution are already in place.But its not just a case of “driving up and dropping off the product”, says André Sarafilovic, MD of Wm Stephens, which has 24 bakeries set up in Scottish convenience stores. These outlets require a separate management team with dedicated in-house telesales, to help with ordering, returns and sales projections, marketing and point-of-sale.”There’s a lot of back-office service work involved,” he says. “The big issue is the amount of time spent training the people at the sharp end on how to handle your product properly.”You have to bring your retail expertise to the customer. You have to convince the franchisee, or in our case, the convenience store operator, that you have a successful record in bakery retail before anybody will take you seriously.”Franchising is very much about repeating a successful model, rather than coming up with a notional model, agrees Phil Craston of Quiznos. “It’s about branding,” he says. “There might be a natural evolution where there is a bakery company with a name that’s recognised, which they could franchise off the back of. For every franchise there is a royalty to pay, so you need to be building a store that can operate well beyond its break-even point.”The initial outlay of anything from £50-£150,000 – for market research, pilot schemes and promotional material, training, forming a central management team and equipment – would put some bakers off. “Long-term, it can be very profitable, but there can be periods of negative trading at the beginning of a franchisor’s life, where there are a lot of costs to put the system in place and to support franchisees, while those franchisees are not sending a huge amount of money back to the franchisor,” says Dan Archer, head of marketing at the British Franchise Association. “If your aim is two to three outlets, then you’re better off borrowing the money; but if you want multiple units across the UK, franchising can help a business grow quickly.”What is franchising?Franchising involves granting a licence to others to sell your product or service. The term “franchising” has been used to describe many different forms of business relationships, including licensing, distributor and agency arrangements. ’Business format franchising’ is the granting of a licence by one person (the franchisor) to another (the franchisee), which entitles the franchisee to trade under the name of the franchisor. This comprises an entire package to establish an untrained person in the business and to run it with continual assistance, and involves charging an initial fee to set up and commanding continuing fees for the support.So why expand through franchising? The franchisor retains control over his products and services. Since franchisees invest their own money, they are likely to be highly motivated to succeed. Centralised costs and overheads are usually lower for a franchise network than for a network of company-owned outlets. The downside is that the franchisor will need to commit substantial amounts of time and money before the income stream begins.last_img read more

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Greggs reports positive sales for spring season

first_imgGreggs said this week that like-for-like sales were up in the 18 weeks to May 5, due to increased footfall and favourable weather conditions.It has also benefited from an increase in the number of shops trading on Sundays, it said at its AGM in Newcastle on Monday. Chairman Derek Netherton said: “Like-for-like sales in the 18 weeks to 5 May 2007 were up by 4.9%, improving on the 3.9% increase for the first nine weeks already reported in March. This compares with a flat sales performance in the first 18 weeks of 2006.”Greggs is continuing a number of trials of new products and shop formats, with encouraging initial results, he said. It was also moving away from its previously decentralised management structure to build a national Greggs brand, he added.Last month Greggs launched the first phase of a £3 million marketing campaign, starring actor Patrick McGuinness, designed to build awareness of the brand.last_img read more

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Consumer view

first_imgI think that bread is under-sold. In a restaurant, for example, it is often used as a distraction before the starter or main course.My wife and I go to a lovely fish restaurant in Ockley, Surrey, called Bryce’s. The bread there is something else. I always try to catch the waitress’ eye to get more. I don’t even put butter on it, because it spoils the taste.They have all sorts of varieties of bread. Some have poppy seeds on top, others have sesame seeds, but they all taste great.I find that when I buy a sandwich in a shop, there is often too much junk in them. If you have a moustache like mine, you end up wearing most of it on your face. They put too much mayo and creamy sauces in, which are full of fat as well.We have a breadmaker at home. I get a superb bread mix from the kitchenware shop Lakeland. It’s a soya and linseed mix. The bread is easy to make and the smell of baking bread is wonderful and very comforting. That’s why they tell you to bake bread if you are trying to sell your house. The smell alone will sell it.Bread also reminds me of my youth. When my brother and I were about 14 years old, we used to get our bread from a place called Jonquil bakery on Whitton high street in Middlesex. We’d go and get a lovely crusty bloomer. It would never stay fresh for long, only a day or two. I think that’s because bakers didn’t put as many additives in bread as they do now. Maybe that’s why it tasted so nice.It was good having to get bread fresh everyday from the bakery; it meant that I could pick up a Danish pastry at the same time.Chris Firth, West Sussexlast_img read more

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Fair deal

first_imgPreviously the preserve of teas and coffees, more and more Fairtrade badges have been popping up on bakery products in recent months. Fairtrade is an organisation that helps to improve trading terms and conditions for producers of, among other products, coffee and chocolate from developing countries. But why should a baker use Fairtrade ingredients, how hard is it to get accredited and what are the hurdles involved?The very first step to becoming Fairtrade-registered involves applying for a company licence from the Fairtrade Foundation. Once approved, those products which intend to carry the mark are then registered. Companies are required to submit full details of all the Fairtrade ingredients, such as the producer, the processor, the exporter/importer and manufacturer.”Collecting such detailed information proved to be very time-consuming and was the main issue in the whole process,” recalls Gemma Cartwright, who headed up the research project behind Fabulous Bakin’ Boys’ (FBB) recent Fairtrade launches. FBB has been a licensee of The Fairtrade Foundation since September 2007 and currently has three Fairtrade products in its Naturally Fabulous range.The complete recipe details were submitted to the Fairtrade Foundation, so that it could check the ingredients declaration and confirm this complied with its composite policy. To do so, the Fairtrade ingredients used in products needed to represent more than 20% of the product’s dry weight.== Sourcing the ingredients ==So how difficult was tracking down ingredients to fit the bill? “Fairtrade provided us with a list of suppliers that were Fairtrade-registered, so sourcing ingredients was not difficult,” explains Cartwright. “However, working with new suppliers and adjusting to new ingredients was time-consuming, especially as none of our existing suppliers were Fairtrade-registered!”FBB eventually found Ragus Sugars, which supplied it with Fairtrade white granulated sugar, demerera sugar and golden syrup, while European firm Schokinag UK provided the Fairtrade dark chocolate, chocolate chips and cocoa powder.Of course, there has to be a rationale for switching from established suppliers to Fairtrade ingredients suppliers, and given the relatively low number of Fairtrade products on the bakery market, knowledge about how Fairtrade bakery products would fare was scant. So throughout 2006 and early 2007, FBB commissioned university graduates to conduct research into consumer trends and look into adult consumers’ perception of the UK bakery snacking industry.What became evident was that consumers wanted to see more ethical cake products in the marketplace, says Cartwright. This was supported by research, conducted for Fairtrade, confirming that 50% of consumers were seeking more Fairtrade cakes. “No other cake brand or competitor of ours was selling Fairtrade cake bars,” she says.The Naturally Fabulous range, introduced in October 2007, has been its most successful product launch to date, says FBB. Of the eight cake bars in the range, three use Fairtrade-certified ingredients and are doing well. In fact, the All Butter Fairtrade Flapjack, made with Fairtrade golden syrup and demerera sugar, is selling twice as much as its five equivalent non-Fairtrade products, adds the firm.The range also includes Fairtrade Dark Chocolate Chunk Brownie and Fairtrade Belgian Chocolate Flapjack. They are all currently available from foodservice establishments and plans are in place to launch them into the supermarkets this year. Customers have embraced the new Fairtrade cake bars and consumers have been very keen to try them, says Cartwright: “It’s a new area for cake and we’re all looking forward to developing a wider selection of Fairtrade cakes in the near future.”Looking back at the process of going through Fairtrade registration, Cartwright would advise any bakers interested in the scheme to firstly get in touch with the Fairtrade Foundation to discuss the available options. “Find the right supplier for your company and use Fairtrade for any questions.”== beyond gimmicks ==Fairtrade should not just be about marketing gimmicks and boosting the bottom line. The scheme aims to cement better terms of trade. The premium afforded to such products goes towards investing in community projects, such as schooling and healthcare for producers in developing countries.”In cases with Fairtrade products, customers pay a premium,” says Cartwright. “In FBB’s case, to support the Fairtrade Foundation and to make our new Fairtrade products more available to consumers, we are absorbing the cost. Prices for our Naturally Fabulous products are consistent across the whole range. It’s really rewarding to be a part of something that helps producers in developing countries get a better trading deal.” nlast_img read more

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Appointments

first_img== Tony Sharpe Renshaw ==Marzipans and ready-to-roll icings manufacturer Renshaw has appointed Tony Sharpe as managing director.Prior to joining Renshaw, Sharpe was managing director of distiller G&J Greenalls and previously held a number of consulting projects for Unilever and Vodaphone. He has also held senior management positions with The Coca-Cola Company and Joshua Tetley.== Alan Browne Allied Bakeries Ireland ==Allied Bakeries Ireland has promoted Alan Browne to the role of operations manager for the company. He is responsible for leading, motivating and developing the operations team to deliver a profitable, growing business and will support the managing director.Browne has worked for Allied Bakeries for five years, starting out as bakeries technical manager.== Roger Whiteside Greggs ==Greggs has appointed Roger Whiteside as an additional non-executive director to the company’s board with effect from 17 March. Whiteside was chief executive of the Thresher Group off-licence chain from 2004 to 2007 and was previously one of the founders of online grocer Ocado. On his appointment, he will also be a member of Greggs’ audit, nominations and remuneration committees.== Phil Orford Forum of Private Business ==The new chief executive of the Forum of Private Business (FPB) is Phil Orford. The FPB represents 25,000 small and medium-sized companies across the UK, fighting for fair treatment of private businesses and supporting its members.Orford formed his own business in 1983 and has since been involved in the development of several firms.last_img read more

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MIWE recovers energy with latest model

first_imgBakery equipment manufacturer, MIWE, has launched an energy recovery system, designed to help bakers reduce energy costs. The MIWE eco:nova, was unveiled at the Suedback exhibition in Stuttgart earlier this month.The machine works by handling oven flue gas and steam separately. The energy contained in the steam, which is higher than that of the flue gas, can be fully exploited and generate maximum savings. The flue gas is fed through a neutralisation unit in the MIWE eco:nova, which extracts the poisonous sulphur dioxide.Typical savings per day are estimated at around 600 kilowatt hours, depending on how much energy is consumed during baking.The system is designed for use with many types of baking ovens and different burner capacities and is recommended for bakers with more than four ovens and a gross burner capacity of at least 320kW, with few upward boundaries.It will be supplied and supported by European Process Plant (EPP), based in Epsom.[http://www.europeanprocessplant.com]last_img read more

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Mercury Packaging acquisition

first_imgFood packaging company Certiforms has been acquired by packaging manufacturer, Mercury Packaging.The deal is part of Mercury Packaging’s expansion plans, enabling the company to offer enhanced printing capabilities, production efficiencies and technical expertise to a number of industries and allow it to increase its focus on the baking industry as well as other sector in the food industry.Certiforms, currently located in Macclesfield, produce wicketted bags that are available in a range of sizes, thicknesses and substrates including low and high density polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), co-extruded films, and polyester. They are available plain or printed in up to eight colours and are manufactured in a variety of different styles.Tony Stanger, Mercury Packaging’s managing director said the acquisition “allows us to quickly penetrate the previously untapped food industry”.Mercury Packaging, based in Nottinghamshire, specialises in the supply of high clarity polypropylene films for display purposes and has recently added a range of laminates to supplement its single ply films for the food packaging sector.last_img read more

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School promotion is a class act

first_imgNational Craft Bakers’ Week, 8-13 June, is a great way to engage with your local community, generate positive media coverage and showcase your products. So why not get involved by organising a visit to a local school where a demonstration and friendly chat could inspire youngsters and interest local media in a photo opportunity?To help, we’ll be giving you a free PR tool kit in the next issue of British Baker (22 May) which includes top tips on how bakers can promote themselves during the Week, as well as a window sticker and poster for point-of-sale, special activities and promotions.Information about the Week has been sent to 22,000 state primary schools and 1,600 independent primary schools to let them know how they can take part and link up with their local baker to find out more about the craft of baking. Teachers are also being encouraged to liaise with companies and invite them to come into school, while there are also two classroom recipes available in information packs to get children to roll their sleeves up and have a go; a bread rolls recipe has been created by Anthony Kindred and one for gingerbread men by Marriage’s.The theme is The Shop That Never Sleeps!, which aims to engage children by showing them that a craft baker’s shop doesn’t rest – products are made through the night to be sold during the day. To illustrate the concept, a video is now available to download at www.bakeryinfo.co.uk so that schools can watch bread, cakes and pies being made at the Oliver Adams craft bakery in Northampton. This will hopefully inspire them to visit their local baker to see the products in the front of the shop.The first ever National Craft Bakers’ Week will take place from 8-13 June. It will be a week-long celebration of all that’s great about bakery, and will help drive sales and raise awareness of the craft. It hopes to get independent bakers to promote themselves in their local communities and make consumers more aware of their craft, and as a result build their customer base. The idea is to get more customers through the door during the Week and then keep those extra customers coming back.The Week will highlight the benefits of buying products from the local baker, namely that these cakes, breads and pastries are high quality, fresh, ’hand-made’, and have low or even no food miles. In addition, the benefits of shopping at a local independent will be communicated: good service, good product choice plus the ability to respond quickly to emerging trends.National Craft Bakers’ Week activity is spearheaded by the National Association of Master Bakers (NAMB) and has been developed with a group of key suppliers (Bako, Bakels, Bakemark, BFP Wholesale, California Raisins, Macphie, Marriage’s, Puratos and The Reynard Group) along with the SAMB and British Baker magazine.All craft bakers are being encouraged to take part and support the Week, no matter what the size or location of their business. Apart from linking up with schools, why not organise some in-store tastings or special promotions and offers? For too long the sector has struggled to promote itself to customers and potential employees, so banish the image of the ’humble baker’ and start shouting about yourselves!—-=== Resources available to bakers for promoting National Craft Bakers’ Week in schools ===l Free PR tool kit in our next issuel Window stickers and postersl Classroom recipes for childrenl Link-ups with school teachersl Video of ’The Shop That Never Sleeps!’l Resources at: www.bakeryinfo.co.uklast_img read more

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