Editorial: Indiana Deserves an Open Discussion on Utility’s Coal-Refurbishing Plan

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette:So many important decisions about Indiana’s future are made without the public discussion and debate they merit. I&M’s plan to refurbish its giant power plant in Rockport, Indiana, is one of them.The Sierra Club, which leads a national campaign to replace coal-fired utility plants with cleaner energy sources, has suggested alternatives to I&M’s multi-billion-dollar plan, which Sierra says will allow the utility to continue to use coal for all its electrical generation until at least 2035. The environmental group maintains that alternative investments in solar and wind power and energy-efficiency programs could allow I&M to shut down one of the two Rockport facilities by 2022 without raising rates or jeopardizing the availability of electricity.Environmentalists focus on the Rockport facility because it is a big polluter – one of the biggest sources of toxic pollution in Indiana. Though I&M plans to introduce new controls to reduce sulfur dioxide at the plant, environmentalists point out that coal is an inherently dirty power source and that many other harmful substances are emitted when it burns.Sierra’s analysis of data released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency contends that, in 2014, I&M’s two Rockport plants released 5.9 million pounds of toxic pollutants into the surrounding area, including arsenic, mercury and lead.“Experts at the Clean Air Task Force estimated in 2014 that AEP Rockport’s air pollution causes 130 premature deaths, 200 heart attacks and 2,200 asthma attacks every year,” the Sierra Club reported on its website.That pollution and those health problems, of course, don’t directly threaten Fort Wayne. But 32 miles east of Evansville on the shore of the Ohio River, the Rockport plant provides a key part of what I&M calls its “generation mix” that allows the company to ensure affordable power to all of its service area. Thus, customers here have a direct interest in Rockport’s operations and plans.No one wants to cause future power shortages or rate spikes. But there is the question of whether a future built on continued reliance on the coal industry, where costs are rising and production is dropping as the world moves toward cleaner and more sustainable power sources, is wise policy. And how do the health effects of years of continuing pollution in southern Indiana figure into the economic and moral equations? If the Rockport plant is causing death and disease, as the Sierra Club contends, shouldn’t the human cost of that continuing damage be part of the calculations on how to proceed?Full item: I&M must continue clean-energy momentum Editorial: Indiana Deserves an Open Discussion on Utility’s Coal-Refurbishing Planlast_img read more

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‘The World Nears Peak Fossil Fuels for Electricity’

first_img‘The World Nears Peak Fossil Fuels for Electricity’ Solar and Wind Prices PlummetFor every doubling in the world’s solar panels, costs fall by 26 percent, a number known as solar’s “learning rate.” Solar is a technology, not a fuel, and as such it gets cheaper and more efficient over time. This is the formula that’s driving the energy revolution. Capacity Factors Go WildOne of the fast-moving stories in renewable energy is the shift in what’s known as the capacity factor. That’s the percentage of a power plant’s maximum potential that’s actually achieved over time.Consider a wind farm. Even at high altitudes, the wind isn’t consistent and varies in strength with the time of day, weather, and the seasons. So a project that can crank out 100 megawatt hours of electricity during the windiest times might produce just 30 percent of that when averaged out over a year. That gives it a 30 percent capacity factor.As technologies continue to improve and as project designers get smarter about their placement, the capacity factors of renewables are increasing. Some wind farms in Texas are now achieving capacity factors of 50 percent, according to BNEF.  Improving capacity factors make renewables more attractive. But capacity factors of gas and coal plants are also changing. Once a solar or wind project is built, the marginal cost of the electricity it produces is pretty much zero—free electricity—while coal and gas plants require more fuel for every new watt produced. If you’re a power company with a choice, you choose the free stuff every time.As natural gas and coal plants are increasingly idled in favor of renewables, their capacity factors will take a big hit, and lifetime cost of those plants goes up. Think of them as the expensive back-up power for cheap renewables. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Tom Randall for Bloomberg News:The way we get electricity is about to change dramatically, as the era of ever-expanding demand for fossil fuels comes to an end—in less than a decade. That’s according to a new forecast by Bloomberg New Energy Finance that plots out global power markets for the next 25 years. Call it peak fossil fuels, a turnabout that’s happening not because we’re running out of coal and gas, but because we’re finding cheaper alternatives. Demand is peaking ahead of schedule because electric cars and affordable battery storage for renewable power are arriving faster than expected, as are changes in China’s energy mix.Here are eight massive shifts coming soon to power markets.There Will Be No Golden Age of GasSince 2008, the single most important force in U.S. power markets has been the abundance of cheap natural gas brought about by fracking. Cheap gas has ravaged the U.S. coal industry and inspired talk of a “bridge fuel” that moves the world from coal to renewable energy. It doesn’t look like that’s going to happen.The costs of wind and solar power are falling too quickly for gas ever to dominate on a global scale, according to BNEF. The analysts reduced their long-term forecasts for coal and natural gas prices by a third for this year’s report, but even rock-bottom prices won’t be enough to derail a rapid global transition toward renewable energy.“You can’t fight the future,” said Seb Henbest, the report’s lead author. “The economics are increasingly locked in.” The peak year for coal, gas, and oil: 2025. A New Polluter to Worry AboutChina, the biggest and fastest-growing polluter, became a major global environmental concern over the past few decades. But that perception is changing fast. China’s evolving economy and its massive shift from coal to renewables mean it will have the greatest reduction in carbon emissions of any country in the next 25 years, according to BNEF. That’s good news for the climate and is a significant change for the global energy outlook.But that leaves India, which is emerging as the biggest threat to efforts to curb climate change. India’s electricity demand is expected to increase fourfold by 2040, and the country will need to invest in a variety of energy sources to meet this overwhelming new demand. India has hundreds of millions of people with little or no access to electricity, and the country sits atop a mountain of coal. It intends to use it. Renewables Attract $7.8 TrillionHumanity’s demand for electricity is still rising, and investments in fossil fuels will add up to $2.1 trillion through 2040. But that will be dwarfed by $7.8 trillion invested in renewables, including $3.4 trillion for solar, $3.1 trillion for wind, and $911 billion for hydro power.Already, in many regions, the lifetime cost of wind and solar is less than the cost of building new fossil fuel plants, and that trend will continue. But by 2027, something remarkable happens. At that point, building new wind farms and solar fields will often be cheaper than running the existing coal and gas generators. “This is a tipping point that results in rapid and widespread renewables development,” according to BNEF.By 2028, batteries will be as ubiquitous as rooftop solar is today. Batteries Join the GridRenewable energy and electric cars create a virtuous cycle of demand growth. Unlike fossil fuels—where a surge of demand leads to higher prices—with new energy technologies more demand begets more scale, and that drives prices lower.The scale-up of electric cars increases demand for renewable energy and drives down the cost of batteries. And as those costs fall, batteries can increasingly be used to store solar power. Electric Cars Rescue Power MarketsIn this discussion of peak fossil fuels, the focus is on electricity generation, not transportation fuels. For cars, peak oil demand will take a bit more time. But the sudden rise of electric cars is on the verge of disrupting oil markets as well, and that has profound implications for electricity markets as more cars plug in.In fact, electric cars couldn’t come at a better time for developed economies. Take Germany, where increases in efficiency mean that without electric cars, demand for electricity would be headed toward a prolonged and destabilizing decline. Electric vehicles will reverse that trend, according to BNEF.The adoption of electric cars will vary by country and continent, but overall they’ll add 8 percent to humanity’s total electricity use by 2040, BNEF found. The Transformation ContinuesBNEF’s outlook for carbon dioxide emissions has improved significantly over the past year, in spite of cheap fossil fuel prices. The shift to renewables is happening shockingly fast—but not fast enough to prevent perilous levels of global warming.Without additional policy action by governments, global carbon dioxide emissions from the power sector will peak in the 2020s and remain relatively flat for the the foreseeable future. That’s not enough to prevent the surface of the Earth from heating more than 2 degrees Celsius, according to BNEF. That’s considered the point of no return for some of the worst consequences of climate change.BNEF’s report focuses on fundamental economics: price, demand, supply. It includes climate-related policies that have already been set into action but doesn’t make any guesses for new policies beyond those. It also doesn’t include any jumps in technology that aren’t clearly already under way.That could be heartening for people concerned about climate change, because if there’s one thing that energy markets have shown in the past decade, it’s that there will be more surprises to come.Full article (with charts): The World Nears Peak Fossil Fuels for Electricitylast_img read more

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Enel begins construction of third wind farm this year in South Africa

first_imgEnel begins construction of third wind farm this year in South Africa FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renewables Now:Italy’s Enel SpA, through its renewables arm Enel Green Power RSA, has launched construction of the 140-MW Garob wind farm in the Northern Cape province in South Africa.Enel said Tuesday it would invest over EUR 200 million (USD 226m) in what will be the company’s third wind power project in the country since the beginning of 2019. EGP is already building Nxuba and Oyster Bay wind farms, both of 140 MW, in South Africa’s Eastern Cape province.The Garob wind farm, with its 46 wind turbines capable of producing around 573 GWh each year, is expected to start generating power by the first half of 2021.The new farm is one of five wind projects totaling 700 MW that EGP won in the fourth bidding round of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme (REIPPPP). Besides Nxuba, Oyster Bay and Garob, Enel’s other awarded schemes include the 140-MW Karusa and the 140-MW Soetwater wind farm projects, both located in the Northern Cape.EGP currently operates more than 520 MW of wind and solar capacity in South Africa. In the wind power department, the company has the 88-MW Nojoli and the 111-MW Gibson Bay wind farms in operation in the Eastern Cape.More: Enel starts building 3rd wind farm of 140 MW in S Africalast_img read more

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Fridays on the Fly | 5 Cold Weather Tips to Keep You Casting this Fall

first_imgThe leaves are dropping and the sun is setting earlier. But don’t let the colder weather and water keep you from taking your fly rod out on a date during the late fall and early winter months. It’s one of my favorite seasons for hitting the streams. I spend my summer fishing the wild waters, which is usually an all day ordeal, but in the winter time I can sneak to a delayed harvest stream and get a quick fix for an hour or two without having to walk more than 50 yards from the truck. The trick is proper preparation. So here are just a few tips to stay warm and stay fishing all winter long.Steve21. Hot hands/Zippo hand warmers – Obviously you want to dress as warm as the weather requires, but sometimes your extremities need a little extra help. I stick a pair of hot hands inside the bottom of my waders and carry a zippo handwarmer with me to stay warm.2. Fish the slower/sunny water – Trout like cold water, but when it gets really cold they need to conserve energy, so try throwing your flies into water that is typically slower moving than you would normally fish. Also drift your bugs through sunny pockets of water. Just like us, when the mercury dips trout prefer to hang out in the sunshine rather than the shadows.3.  Nymphing – It’s rare I do anything but Nymph fishing all winter long. I prefer using the yarn indicators because they don’t make a splash and the white ones resemble foam on the river. Below that I like to run a heavier/big bug like a stonefly or a girdle bug to get the flies down low followed by a trailer 12-16 inches behind with a flashy tiny nymph or some sort of egg pattern. If you aren’t catching anything try alternating your bugs and your depths.4. Delayed Harvest – The wild streams are always more scenic and less crowded, but all winter long delayed harvest streams are available with stocked fish that are not allowed to be harvested until spring. I love going to the same holes and trying to catch the same fish. If you have never taken a drift boat out give one of your local guides a call. You can usually land a discounted rate in the winter months, and it’s guaranteed to be an absolute blast.steve55. Beverages – Insulated canteens are the greatest. Fill with some hot chocolate or coffee and it will stay hot ALL day long, and a flask of bourbon is always a good way to stay warm.last_img read more

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Pisgah National Forest Officials Consider Fees for Mountain Bikers and Equestrians

first_imgNOTE: This article is based on reporting done by the Transylvania Times.In response to looming federal budget cuts, officials with the Pisgah National Forest of western North Carolina are considering a pay to play program geared toward mountain bikers and equestrians.The idea, which the Forest Service is calling a “concept” at this point as opposed to an official proposal, would require mountain bikers and horseback riders to pay a fee in exchange for access to trail networks within the 500,000 acre national forest, though it doesn’t specify a dollar amount or specific trails.The concept was announced by Pisgah’s head ranger Dave Casey during a recent Transylvania Natural Resources Council meeting in Brevard, North Carolina. Casey said that the idea would be “game changer” for Pisgah—one of the most popular mountain biking destinations on the entire East Coast.Some forest users, such as hunters and fishermen, are already required to ante up fees through mandatory licensing programs.What say you?[megapoll id=”10″]last_img read more

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Trail Mix – Bill & The Belles

first_imgEver wonder what was on the radio when Dr. Brown went hurtling across the space/time continuum in the Back To The Future movies?It might have been tunes from Bill & The Belles.This Johnson City quartet writes and performs music that is, most definitely, a sonic trip through time. Drawing inspiration from music that spans decades before now, it doesn’t seem unlikely that you would find a Bill & The Belles track on a dusty Victrola 78, filed away with sides cut by artists like Jimmie Rodgers, The Carter Family, and Charley Patton in a vintage cabinet record player.Kris Truelson, singer and guitarist for the band, is a student of old music, working as the producer for WBCM/Radio Bristol, the flagship radio station headquartered at the Birthplace of Country Music in Bristol, Virginia. Joining him in the band Kalia Yeagle on fiddle, Grace Van’t Hof on banjo, and Karl Zerfas on bass.In a region heavily populated with bands who turn their ears backward in time for musical inspiration – bluegrass and old-time are staples in the mountains of Southwest Virginia and Northeast Tennessee – Bill & The Bells have cultivated a singular status. There is no other band out there better at rekindling the sound, and the interest in it, of that early 20th-century Appalachian band. Their ability to rejuvenate the sounds of years gone by has landed them the role as house band for Farm & Fun Time, a monthly live performance radio show that originated in Bristol in the 1940s, and they have become featured performers at festivals across the country.I recently caught up with the whole band to chat about the new record, the musical history of Bristol, and what to check out if you make it to the Birthplace of Country Music Museum.BRO – What’s the secret to keeping the music you play fresh?B&TB – A lot of the music we’re inspired by has a timeless quality to it. The inspiration for our music spans about 150 years, so it sometimes feels funny to refer to when our music “comes from,” but the melodies and songs we pick are ones that we feel can be as relevant today as they were “back then.” Our new album, DreamSongs, Etc., features half original material, and that’s going to be a focus for us moving forward. The songs we’re introducing are brand new and maintain the same timelessness that originally shaped our band’s sound.BRO – Farm & Fun Time has become a staple at the Birthplace of Country Music. If you could bring back one guest from the program’s earliest days, who would it be and what song would you want to hear?B&TB – One of the coolest things about today’s Farm & Farm Time is the fact that we’ve been able to have so many living performers from back in the 1940s and 1950s on board. Ralph Stanely, Jesse McReynolds, and a lot of other regional artists have been a part of the show, and we are honored to keep its legacy alive.BRO – Along the same lines, your favorite recording from the Bristol Sessions? One that makes you think, “Boy howdy, I’d like to have been there when they laid that down.”B&TB – Everything Alfred Karnes laid down. We was one of the best, most powerful singers of the day. One of his songs was highly influetial for a track on our album, “Back To My Childhood Days.” Can you guess which one?BRO – We are featuring “Finger Pointin’ Mama” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song?B&TB – It’s a cheeky take on the classic relationship gone wrong song, about the frustration of dealing with people you don’t want to deal with. A little funny, a little cathartic, a little nasty. It’s a much needed reminder to be honest with yourself and each other.BRO – Best reason to visit the Birthplace of Country Music Museum?B&TB – You’ll find us there the second Thursday of every month for Farm & Fun Time! We’re the house band and Kris is the host, and he’s put a whole lot of work into this show over the last few years. We’re proud of what it’s accomplished and are glad to be a part of a monthly celebration of our region. The Birthplace of Country Music also puts on the Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion, a festival we look forward to every year and has come to feel like a home for our band.You can catch Bill & The Belles this week in Nashville and Knoxville.The August Farm & Fun Time was last week, but if you are in the Bristol area for Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion, you can catch all the fun that weekend.For more information on Bill & The Belles, upcoming shows, and the brand new record, please check out their website.And be sure to take a listen to “Finger Pointin’ Mama,” along with new tunes from Hot Rize, Chicago Farmer, The Devil Makes Three, and many more, on this month’s Trail Mix.last_img read more

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Quick Hits: April 2019 Outdoor News

first_imgA new study has found that rock climbers are a major economic force for the New River Gorge, a renowned rock climbing destination in West Virginia. The study found that climbers contributed $12.1 million in tourism dollars annually across a three-county region in West Virginia. Climber spending also directly supports 168 jobs in the region and contributes $6.3 million in wages. 4. Establishing a new national monument in Mississippi to honor civil rights leader Medgar Evers, who worked to end segregation and championed voting rights; When Wardian returned home, he ran three more marathons on consecutive days on a USATF-certified course, and in doing so, set a pending record for the fastest completion of 10 marathons in 10 straight days with a cumulative time of 29 hours, 12 minutes, and 46 seconds. Surprisingly, Wardian posted his fastest time in the tenth marathon, completing the run in 2:44:33.  Former pro cyclist Floyd Landis was stripped of his 2006 Tour de France title after testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs. This spring, Landis will open a joint bike shop and café that focuses on CBD-based products in Lancaster, Pa. Floyd’s of Lancaster Café will feature products from Landis’s Colorado-based company Floyd’s of Leadville, which sells a range of supplements containing CBD—the non-psychoactive compound in cannabis that is becoming a popular option to aid in recovery and pain relief among endurance athletes. In announcing the new business, Landis, who’s originally from Farmersville, Pa., stated that he plans to make “significant purchases” from hemp farmers in Pennsylvania, attempting to boost and promote agribusiness in his old home state. Big Win for Public Lands Amount spent on outdoor recreation in 2017 in the United States—more than coal, oil, and gas combined. The outdoor economy is also growing by 3.8 percent, faster than the overall economy. Walls are meant for climbing Conservation groups and concerned residents have filed suit over a proposed spaceport in south Georgia, charging that the county government is unlawfully withholding documents concerning public safety and environmental impacts.  The world’s largest permanent free-soloing wall is at the U.S. National Whitewater Center in Charlotte, and on April 26-27, top climbers—and a few wild cards— will compete for a $15,000 cash purse at the Tuck Fest Deep Water Solo comp. Seeding rounds will take place on Friday followed by finals on Saturday. The top 16 male and female climbers will move on to the finals, where climbers will compete head-to-head in a single elimination, tournament-style bracket. The fastest climber to the top of the wall will advance until a champion is crowned. Emily Harrington, Carlo Traversi, Paige Claasen, and Emma Hunt are among the climbers competing at Tuck Fest this year. Floyd Landis to Open Bike Shop and Hemp-Focused Café in Pennsylvania 5. Creating an ecological buffer around Yellowstone National Park, preventing areas adjacent to the park from being mined.   Southern Environmental Law Center filed suit after Camden County refused to release several public health and safety documents related to the proposed spaceport, including debris field maps and an analysis estimating the number of human deaths that could occur if a rocket explodes on the launch pad or in the air. The proposed spaceport would launch rockets directly over neighborhoods and hikers and campers on Cumberland Island National Seashore. Number of bikes gifted by Wheels to Africa since the nonprofit formed 14 years ago. The Virginia-based organization collects unwanted bikes around metro Washington, D.C., and ships them to countries around the world in an effort to assist those with transportation needs. The organization was started by Winston Duncan (with help from his mother) when he was only 10 years old, back in 2005. Although most of the bikes have gone to residents in different African countries, this year Duncan and his mom, Dixie, took 400 bikes to Puerto Rico and gave them to residents still recovering from the devastating effects of Hurricane Maria.  Photo by: Daniel Gajda In the Dark about Spaceport Risks 1. Permanently reauthorizing the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which uses fees from offshore drilling to pay for conservation programs in all 50 states; Michael Wardian is at it again. The 44-year-old, Arlington-based ultrarunner, well known in the running world for setting a range of long-distance records that are both amazing and a little strange, won the World Marathon Challenge for the second time in February. Runners in the World Marathon Challenge complete seven full marathons on seven continents in seven days. The multi-race event starts in Antarctica and finishes in Miami. Wardian averaged a time of 2:58:30 on the seven marathon courses.center_img $887 billion  3. Preserving over 700,000 acres of land in southern Utah, an area that environmentalists have been trying to protect for decades; Courtney Pernell decided to put her own creative twist on trail magic. The artist, based in Raleigh, N.C., placed 100 ceramic stars along the 62-mile Falls Lake section of the Mountains to Sea Trail as a pottery treasure hunt for hikers. With help and promotion from the nonprofit Friends of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail, she also put three crafted hearts on the trail, which could be redeemed for prizes from the organization.  In late February, the House of Representatives passed the Natural Resources Management Act, which protects more than three million acres of land, creates at least five national park units, bars mining on lands near two national parks, and classifies hundreds of miles of U.S. rivers as wild and scenic. The bill previously passed the Senate and now awaits the President’s signature as of press date. Some highlights of the bill include: Climbers flex economic muscle in New River Gorge North Carolina Artist Offers Creative Hiking Incentive Virginia Runner Sets Record with 10 Marathons in 10 Days 8,000 The bill designates 1.3 million acres as wilderness and funds protection for some 380 bird species under the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act. Must-See: Deep Water Solo Comp at Tuck Fest 2. Extending the popular “Every Kid Outdoors” program for another seven years, which grants the nation’s fourth graders and their families a free national parks pass; “While we have long been concerned that this project poses serious threats to public health and the local economy of Camden County, the lack of transparency about the real risks of Spaceport Camden only deepens those concerns,” said Megan Desrosiers, Executive Director of the nonprofit One Hundred Miles. “The notion that coastal communities can and should accept that rockets will be launched over one of the most economically and ecologically important areas for the state of Georgia without knowing exactly what those risks look like is absurd.” In addition to winning national races like the U.S. 50K and 50-mile Championships, some of the records Wardian has set in the past include the world’s fastest 50K on a treadmill, fastest marathon while pushing a stroller, and fastest marathon dressed as Elvis Presley. The North Face is building a public climbing wall in Atlanta. Through a partnership with the Trust for Public Land, The North Face is establishing public climbing boulders across the country. Atlanta’s public climbing wall will resemble the local rock in Horse Pens, a legendary climbing area in Alabama, and will also display the initials of the kid designers. The new climbing area, part of Rodney Cook Sr. Park, aspires to attract a diverse population of climbers, both experienced and beginners. Martin Luther King Jr.’s adult home is one block from the park.last_img read more

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Fest Finds

first_imgIt’s more than a well-made reboot of the classic Aloha shirt. Beyond a stylish summer print, the shirt— hand-sewn in Santa Ana— has a secure sunglasses loop and two unique pockets: one made to hold a bottle and another with lining to keep your phone dry. The best addition, though, is the built-in towel that will soak up sweat when you’re dancing under the Southern sun. $135; californiacowboy.com  Sunski Topeka The Allman Betts Band Drop your shades in a festival crowd and they’re likely gone for good. Fortunately Sunski makes relatively inexpensive performance sunglasses that feature high-quality polarized lenses that will cut the glare when you’re trying to find a sightline of the main stage. The newly released Topeka has an extremely lightweight frame and subtle rubber grips around the nose, so you can bob your head to the groove without worry. $68; sunski.com  These lightweight American-made socks—mostly merino wool with a blend of quick-drying synthetics—are all about conforming to the contours of your feet; with gradual compression that doesn’t allow blister-inducing movement. They’re also made with extra cushioning in the heel, arch, and toe, providing much-needed padding for staying nimble on trails or the festival grounds. $19.99; fitssock.com Fans of the Allman Brothers Band should take notice of this family offshoot carrying the legacy forward of the Southern blues explorers. As the name suggests, the Allman Betts Band features the progeny of original Allman Brothers members, including Devon Allman (son of Gregg) and Duane Betts (son of Dickey). Together the guitarists will embark on a massive tour this summer, honoring the 50th anniversary of the Allman Brothers by playing classics like “Blue Sky” and “One Way Out,” while also diving into new material from the forthcoming album of originals, Down To the River. Appearing at: Back Home Festival and Lockn’ Festival  The Yawpers  Named after a line in a Walt Whitman poem and coming off a concept album (2017’s Boy in a Well) about a tragedy set in World War II-era France, the Yawpers are a Colorado-based garage-blues trio that combines distortion with thought-provoking depth. Using a bass-free, two-guitar-and-drums attack, the band delivers raw rockabilly grooves, primitive Delta callbacks, and full-throttle punk workouts, led by front man Nate Cook’s howling vocals and angst-releasing lyrics. Human Question, the band’s third effort for the insurgent country label Bloodshot Records, expands the band’s righteously ragged, roots-driven sound even further; from the juke-joint boogie of “Child of Mercy” to the gospel-fueled “Carry Me.” Appearing at:  FloydFest Hydro Flask 32 oz. Wide Mouth Cool and comfortable shorts are key when you’re hopping from stage to stage. Topo’s River Shorts—available for men and women—are made with breathable, water-repellent nylon that offers two-way stretch to keep you mobile. Another essential feature: the zippered back pocket that keeps your keys, cash, and cards secure when you’re busting a move. $79; topodesigns.com  FITS Light Hiker Mini-Crew Socks Don’t waste your money on an overpriced plastic bottle of water at a concession stand. Most festivals these days have free water filling stations, so be ready with Hydro Flask’s Wide Mouth. The bottle’s pro-grade stainless steel is a healthier way to hydrate, and the 32-ounce size option is extremely durable, with double-wall insulation, so it will keep your liquid of choice cold for 24 hours. You also get additional insulation from the savvy lid, and a rubber handle that makes transport easy. $39.95; hydroflask.com   With drum circles and that drunk dude howling at the moon, getting a good night’s sleep in Tent City isn’t always easy. Sierra Designs comes to the rescue with the Frontcountry Bed, a zipper-free sleeping bag that provides some of the comforts of home, including an integrated comforter and foot vents when you need a little circulation. Earplugs not included. $199.95; sierradesigns.com  Festival Gear California Cowboy High Water Shirt Forsake Men’s Maddox and Women’s Maya Della Maecenter_img Sierra Designs Frontcountry Bed 35 Duo Topo Designs River Short Speaking of the Allman Brothers, the Grammy-nominated bluegrass quartet Della Mae crush an acoustic version of “Whipping Post” on the new Butcher Shoppe EP. Lead singer Celia Woodsmith brings a throaty intensity to match the original’s vocals but Kimber Ludiker’s sweet fiddle lines give the staple a pastoral reimagining. Another standout, “Bourbon Hound,” is a ragtime romp with fiery solos that land between lyrics celebrating brown-water-fueled fun. Following the departure of guitarist Courtney Hartman, the group gets some help on the new effort from Molly Tuttle and Alison Brown. As this band of quick pickers finds new footing, they’re heading in a promising direction. Appearing at: Red Wing Roots Music Festival UCO Gear Beta Headlamp  The Soul Rebels Music Finds & Festival Gear Finds The Soul Rebels No need to stumble in the darkness on the way back to your tent. The Beta is a nicely priced headlamp that features four brightness settings and an impressively long battery life—70 hours on three AAAs. Plus the trippy strap patterns will give you some festival flair. $24.99; ucogear.com  If you appreciate a proper blast of New Orleans brass, this eight-piece ensemble always delivers. Well versed in traditional Crescent City sounds, the Soul Rebels also like to branch out from their roots, using powerful horn lines to play brass-band-style covers of beloved pop, rock, and hip-hop songs. At the big band’s energetic live shows, crowds can be dancing to a funky second-line groove one minute, then singing along to Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky” or the Eurythmics’ “Sweet Dreams” the next. The group’s ability to incorporate a wide breadth of musical styles has led to collaborations with a diverse range of artists—from Nas and Macklemore & Ryan Lewis to Pretty Lights and Marilyn Manson. When home, the band plays a weekly residency at New Orleans’ Le Bon Temps Roule, but they’ve been traveling around the world to play festivals, including some notable events this summer in the South. Appearing at: Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival and Lockn’ Festival Sonic adventures require the right equipment. Let BRO tune you in to the best gear for multi-day festivals.  A mix of support and breathability—just what you want for a festival shoe. The Forsake Men’s Maddox and Women’s Maya are both made with nylon knit that’s all about airflow, while the ridged rubber soles are gritty enough for both day hikes or stomping along to your favorite bluegrass band. $114.95; forsake.com  Part of the fun of festivals is finding new favorite bands. Check out these four acts playing music bashes in the region.   last_img read more

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National Weather Service issues “falling iguana alert” in Florida

first_imgThe weather service went on to explain that iguanas are cold-blooded, so they slow down or become immobile when temperatures drop into the 40s. “They may fall from trees, but they are not dead,” the weather service said. On Saturday, Feb. 8, hiker Jeff Mitchell will offer a free presentation at the Dietrich Theater in Abington, Va titled “Hiking Through the Natural Beauty of Pennsylvania.” Mitchell’s presentation will focus on Pennsylvania’s parks and natural areas, including waterways. Free tickets will be available at the door or can be reserved by calling 570-836-1022. Mark your calendars for these popular hiking festivals slated to take place this spring in Tennessee and Virginia National Weather Service issues “falling iguana alert” in Florida The festivities kick off May 2 with the Erwin Great Outdoors Festival on Main Street in downtown Erwin. The festival’s purpose is to encourage people to “embrace their love for nature.” Mitchell is an experienced hiker and author of several books including “Hiking the Endless Mountains,” “Backpacking Pennsylvania” and “Paddling Pennsylvania.”  It may be the dead of winter but spring is right around the corner and, with it, three popular hiking festivals will return to Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia.  On Tuesday night the National Weather Service in Miami, FL issued a warning for Floridians to be on the lookout for falling iguanas, thanks to an unusual burst of cold air. The weather service sent out the warning on Twitter. “This isn’t something we usually forecast, but don’t be surprised if you see Iguanas falling from the trees tonight as lows drop into the 30s and 40s,” they tweeted. “Brrr!” Next up is Roan Mountain’s Hikerpalooza 2020, taking place on May 9, 10 and 11. The festival celebrates the fourth year since Roan Mountain was awarded the official AT Community designation and is part of an ongoing effort to promote “awareness, interaction and conservation of” the Appalachian Trail.  Finally, the 34th Appalachian Trail Days Festival is scheduled for May 15- 17 in Damascus, Va. The festival features a hiker parade, vendors and exhibitors, music, camping and more. Hiker Jeff Mitchell offers free presentation in Abington about hiking in PAlast_img read more

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Bolivia Plans to Invest One Billion USD to Industrialize Mining

first_imgBy Dialogo October 28, 2010 The current government should do the same in Colombia, create the Banco Minero with about 3 billion dollars and support all LEGALIZED mining, and impose a percentage for Silviagriculture with compensatory REFORESTATION in the impact of farms, mainly foreign. Investors will benefit from the same mines, it creates many jobs and improves the environment. Bolivia plans to use one billion dollars from its net international reserves (NIR) to pursue mining industrialization projects in sectors such as, principally, lithium, zinc, copper, gold, and iron, an official source announced on 26 October. The deputy minister for productive development in mining and metallurgy, Héctor Córdova, judged that the government “cannot miss the opportunity to have this happen, without reacting (to the windfall of high international prices),” and proposed that the state pursue all links in the mining production chain. “The state has to be the producer, the one who is working at every link in the mining chain: exploration, exploitation, refining, obtaining the metal, whether by smelting or by other methods, and commercialization,” he proposed, speaking to the Catholic radio station Fides. Official data from the state-owned Central Bank of Bolivia (BCB, the bank of issue) reveal that its reserves are over 9 billion dollars, representing around 50% of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP). “A billion dollars will get us a good part of what we’ve thought about: the zinc plants are 500 million dollars to set up, exploiting lithium carbonate will need around 300 million in the first phase,” Córdova explained. The Central Bank recently authorized a loan of one billion dollars for hydrocarbon industrialization. Mining exports between January and July of this year were worth 1.056 billion dollars, compared to 719.4 million recorded during the same period in 2009. If this trend continues, mining sales could be worth more than 2 billion dollars at the end of the year, according to official forecasts.last_img read more

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