Nagorno-Karabakh: Russia deploys peacekeeping troops to region

first_imgJubilant scenes in Azerbaijan Russia’s Vladimir Putin said last month that almost 5,000 people had been killed in the fighting. The peace deal, which was signed by Russian President Vladimir Putin, Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev and Armenia’s prime minister, took effect on Tuesday from 01:00 local time (21:00 GMT Monday). The protesters who gathered here overnight accused the government of betrayal. They believed the fighting should have continued until the end and they were confident of victory. The enclave is internationally recognised as Azerbaijani but has been run by ethnic Armenians since 1994. There is a mood of national celebration in Baku. At Martyrs’ Alley – a memorial to Azerbaijan’s fallen soldiers – there are surging crowds among a sea of flags. Two young students are holding a homemade sign that reads: “Tell the world we are coming home.” It is a home they have never seen. Their parents were driven from Nagorno-Karabakh almost 30 years ago, but now they intend to move there to build a new life. read more

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London Pulse increase focus on mental health of their athletes | Netball News

first_img– Advertisement – London Pulse's Lindsay Keable discusses the support she receives and why focusing on your mental health is so important as an athlete
London Pulse's Lindsay Keable discusses the support she receives and why focusing on your mental health is so important as an athlete

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Give it up, Jack. It’s time for Twitter to block Donald Trump and his conspiracy theories

first_imgHere’s the thing about that boycott, though. It will last all of a few weeks before all but the most conspiracy-minded frothers get sick of screaming into the wilderness of new hate-speech sites and come groveling back to post memes and recipes. Plus, there might be a positive relations boost from being seen as not willing to sell out the country to avoid peeving racist crackpots—a plus, during a time when Congress is contemplating whether social media companies are indeed the threats to democracy and public safety that their critics contend.Whatever. We are all very tired of explaining and coaxing. Either do the right thing for the sake of doing the right thing, or shut up with all the talk of deep principles and corporate hand-wringing. In the end it seems we are going to have to come to some solution ourselves, democracy by democracy, to avoid becoming slaves to microtargeting tools provided to autocracies and to the whims of whoever can be the most successfully unprincipled. But Donald Trump has no inherent right to use any non-public platform to mislead Americans or stoke conspiracy-premised violence. If you let him, that’s on you. Of Trump’s post-election tweets, Twitter has chosen to slap warning labels on a rising chunk of them—a not entirely pointless exercise, but not one that truly limits a malignant narcissism-fueled anti-democratic despot seeking to overturn U.S. election results because they made him Sad. He continues to pipe up with conspiracy theory after conspiracy theory, directs supporters to conspiracy-promoting websites and videos, and lies egregiously about all, as in all, subjects.Despite popular belief, Twitter is not required, as a company, to host speech clearly intended to damage the country. This is not a case of a powerful man simply blabbering in public, but a propaganda campaign explicitly intended to cast doubt on America’s democracy itself, with wild claims that “millions” of fraudulent, invisible votes swung the election away from him as part of some secret plot. Twitter does not have to harm the nation by allowing it. Not Facebook, not any of the other companies.- Advertisement – Trump will have no rights being violated if Twitter blocks his account this very evening. There is no important presidential duty that can only be carried out via Twitter. The man lives in a house with a dedicated press room funded by the United States government himself; he can soil that, if he likes, and networks can decide whether to cover his outbursts as they happen. But Trump does not have the right to defraud the American public on Twitter’s personal dime, unless Twitter wants it to happen.Give it up, Jack. It’s time.We know that the reason Twitter has resisted is, in the end, money and cowardice. If Donald Trump is barred from using Twitter as propaganda device, Donald Trump’s slobbering followers will declare a boycott. This will make Twitter sad, make investors sad, and briefly make the site slightly less of a charred hellscape. Because the greatest edict of all companies, from Fox News to Facebook to Twitter, is to not make investors sad even if their product is doing real damage to their audience and nation.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Study suggests drug-resistant strains of influenza B can spread

first_imgApr 13, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Japanese researchers who identified antiviral-resistant strains of influenza B found that they seemed to circulate in communities and families and to make patients just as sick as their nonresistant counterparts did, contrary to a common assumption that resistant flu viruses are likely to be less transmissible and less virulent.The report in the Apr 4 Journal of the American Medical Association says that strains with reduced drug sensitivity “appear to be transmitted from person to person” and that the clinical course of influenza B infection “did not appear to be affected by the sensitivity of the virus to neuraminidase inhibitors,” though the sample size was small.Other researchers have documented antiviral-resistant strains of the (influenza A) H5N1 avian flu virus in Egypt and Vietnam, and with the threat of an influenza pandemic in mind, disease experts are eager to learn more about how flu viruses evolve in response to antiviral medications.The Japanese group, with the goal of detecting and analyzing antiviral resistance in influenza B strains, isolated samples from patients who were diagnosed with influenza B during the 2004-05 season in the pediatric departments of four community hospitals. Their study was conducted during a year when the influenza B virus caused widespread outbreaks in Japan, where the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir are used more extensively than anywhere else in the world.The investigators, with Shuji Hatakeyama, MD, PhD, of the University of Tokyo as lead author, collected influenza B isolates from 74 children before and after treatment with oseltamivir, along with pretreatment samples from 348 other patients.After using a sialidase inhibition assay to evaluate the antiviral sensitivity of the samples, the group sequenced the neuraminidase and hemagglutinin genes of those that showed reduced sensitivity to neuraminidase inhibitors to determine if any had mutations associated with antiviral resistance.In one of the 74 children who received treatment with oseltamivir, researchers identified an influenza B variant with reduced drug sensitivity that had a Gly402Ser neuraminidase substitution. In seven of the pretreatment samples, they found three different influenza B variants associated with reduced drug sensitivity, carrying the mutations labeled Asp198Asn, Ile222Thr, and Ser250Gly.In reviewing the clinical and viral genetic information from the seven patients whose pretreatment isolates showed drug resistance, the researchers concluded that four were probably infected in the community and three were likely infected by their siblings.The researchers did not find any difference in the clinical course of illness between patients who had “wild-type” viruses and those who had drug-resistant strains. Also, there was no difference in the extent of virus shedding, though the number of patients with drug-resistant strains was too small to assess statistical significance, the report says.The authors concluded that frequent Japanese use of oseltamivir—which they said was prescribed 90 times more often than zanamivir during the 2004-05 flu season—could have generated the drug-resistant influenza B strains found in the study.”Continued surveillance for the emergence or spread of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant influenza viruses is critically important,” the authors write.In an editorial accompanying the research report, antiviral experts Ann Moscona, MD, of Weill Medical College of Cornell University in New York City, and Jennifer McKimm-Breschkin, PhD, of Molecular and Health Technologies in South Victoria, Australia, write that the Japanese study serves as a wake-up call regarding the emergence of flu viruses resistant to neuraminidase inhibitors.In vitro and animal studies have found that resistant viruses were less infective and transmissible, they write, which “has led to the belief that significant transmission is unlikely to occur among humans.” The Japanese study suggests that such strains are transmissible, they assert.Though the study raises more questions than it answers about viral evolution, biological fitness, and transmissibility, it establishes that influenza B mutants with reduced neuraminidase inhibitor sensitivity are transmissible and can cause clinical illnesses mirroring those caused by wild-type influenza B strains, according to Moscona and McKimm-Breschkin.”Contrary to what had been hoped until now, some resistant variants are vigorous pathogens,” they write.”Influenza viruses evolve rapidly and nimbly, which compels ongoing investigation of antiviral therapies that use alternative mechanisms of action and target different points in the viral life cycle,” the article states.Hatakeyama S, Sugaya N, Ito M, et al. Emergence of influenza B viruses with reduced sensitivity to neuraminidase inhibitors. JAMA 2007 Apr;297(13):1435-41 [Abstract]Moscona A, McKimm-Breschkin J. News about influenza B drug resistance that cannot be ignored (editorial). JAMA 2007 Apr;297(13):1492-93 [Abstract]last_img read more

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PROMISING PRACTICES FOR PANDEMIC PLANNING Addressing psychological needs in disaster response

first_imgEditor’s Note: CIDRAP’s Public Health Practices online database showcases peer-reviewed practices, including useful tools to help others with their planning. This article is one of a series exploring the development of these practices. We hope that describing the process and context of these practices enhances pandemic planning.Dec 1, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – A training program under way through the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) aims to reduce the psychological impact of emergencies and disasters in a process that has similarities to delivering physical first aid.Since September 11, 2001, there has been a growing understanding of the psychological impact of terrorism and disasters. Thus more professional and lay responders have learned a range of ways to address the psychological needs of people affected by terrorism and disasters. One type of training, called psychological first aid (PFA), is increasingly used as a first step in assisting people caught in disasters.Nancy Carlson, the behavioral health preparedness coordinator at the MDH, began teaching PFA in Minnesota more than 4 years ago. The training program offers basic courses for disaster behavioral health responders and addresses the needs of specific local audiences.”Our main goal is to have psychological first aid become one of the programs in Minnesota like the physical first aid that everybody can do.” Carlson said.Short, efficient training”Although the federal government recommended psychological first aid shortly after September 11, 2001,” Carlson said, “there was no training for first responders or healthcare providers.”One of the only PFA courses available at that time was taught by the International Red Cross in Africa. It was designed for communities that were short of mental health professionals. “It didn’t fit in with our needs.” said Carlson.The length of the course—for example, 40 hours from the International Red Cross—was another barrier.”No one here could take that kind of time off to do the training,” Carlson said. So she and her colleagues brought in mental health professionals and experienced agencies and then created their own Minnesota model, a 2- to 4-hour training class for emergency responders.They identified several priorities for improving disaster mental health response, including communicating with people about their spiritual needs, helping people to feel safe in uncertain circumstances and surroundings, and providing people a safe environment to allow them to talk openly.The PFA training in Minnesota is delivered mainly by presentation, with content adapted to the target audience. For example, in the presentation tailored to K-12 school staff, a scenario involving a student killed in a car accident is provided in addition to the basic PFA curriculum. The presentation for hospital staff addresses hospital surge and the influx of patients during a disaster.This training is free to recipients. The cost is covered through the federal Department of Health and Human Services healthcare system preparedness program grant, Carlson said.Minnesota it is not the only state teaching PFA. Several other state health departments, including Florida, Nebraska, and Texas, also provide this training. Some online self-study programs are available as well.User-friendly informationAlthough PFA responders are not necessarily licensed behavioral health professionals, they do provide important interventions following a disaster. PFA responders listen with compassion, provide any needed referrals, and encourage healthy coping strategies, such as eating healthfully and getting rest and exercise. It is a role that anybody can play provided they have received PFA training.”In addition, people are trained to identify the situation that is too serious and pressing for them,” Carlson said. “They also need to know how to help people to get access to the professional mental health services.”In Minnesota, trainees receive a PFA card with the information on:Promoting safetyFostering calm and comfortPromoting connectednessEncouraging self empowermentOffering prevention strategiesTeaching self-care”It’s really a very simple concept,” Carlson said, “and it is now part of the personal and family emergency preparedness training, a course designed for the preparedness of emergencies in Minnesota.”Using PFA in disastersAlthough the training was years in the making, it was put to use quickly. The collapse of the Interstate 35W bridge in Minneapolis in 2007, which resulted in 13 deaths and 127 injuries, is a good example.”We designed a family assistance center after the disaster,” Carlson said.  “People were brought in and provided a safe place. They talked with us, saying that they felt comfortable and connected with the other survivors.”It worked really well,” Carlson said. “People felt like their needs were being met. Since then, we got lots of people who said they want to get this training.”Unlike pulling people in during the bridge disaster, responders pushed service out during flooding last August in Southeastern Minnesota.Rose Olmsted, MS, is the social services supervisor in Freeborn County, Minn. She helped coordinate the MDH’s southeastern Minnesota behavioral response in the flood, bringing volunteers into the flood-affected areas right after the disaster. Responders included local public health employees and county human services and community mental health center staff. Almost all the lay volunteers received PFA training before they responded.”I think the PFA training did affect responders,” said Olmsted a licensed social worker. “They started to realize that listening is very important, and they saw the power of being able to give choices, and then people were empowered by making choices.”Much of the responders’ work amounted to listening to people. In at least one case, a responder used the PFA training to understand when a person’s situation needed more expert attention. “There was one time when local citizens in the shelter asked for help to get someone who was able to talk about suicide with them. It was too difficult to think about life going on at that time,” Olmsted said.Olmsted and her colleagues didn’t have an opportunity to follow up with flood victims to measure the effectiveness of the PFA training, although anecdotal evidence suggests it was valuable. “We have had good response from the survivors,” she said.The training also helped responders realize they needed to take care of themselves. For example, many conservation officers who were used to rescuing animals had to adjust to the stress of rescuing people instead. And some responders were themselves victims of the flooding.”So the self-care for every responder is critical,” Olmsted noted, mentioning that trainers had provided self-care cards to responders.In addition to training the volunteers from other parts of the state, Minnesota’s PFA program also gets local community responders involved, which “is vital for community resilience after a disaster,” Carlson said.New goals, new challengesAccording to the statistics from the MDH’s Nancy Carlson, more than 20,000 people from all over Minnesota have been trained in PFA. And the training is ongoing throughout the state.Not solely designed for disasters, PFA training can be used anywhere, such as during seasonal flu and even pandemic influenza.”A few years ago, when we had a shortage of flu vaccine, there were a lot of people calling in, and they were upset,” Carlson said.The big difference during a flu pandemic would be that the responders could not have individual, face-to-face conversations, she said, “But it would be the same skills. We are still able to use the PFA via phones such as hotlines, and [in] training family members and community groups.”Public awareness of the availability and usefulness of PFA training continues to lag, especially when there is no sign of disaster, and this lack of awareness concerns Carlson.”But we can hit our target audience by going through different community groups. And our next goal is developing a program for kids to train the youth on how to help each other deal with their emotions, through which we can promote the training program further,” Carlson said.See also: View tools and reviewers’ comments from the “Minnesota Psychological First Aid Training” practicelast_img read more

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Brac and Solta are connected by a boat line for the first time

first_imgFinally, the high-speed two-way line Split-Rogač (Šolta) -Milna (Brač) was introduced, which connected the islands of Šolta and Brač for the first time.As reported by the Split-Dalmatia County, the line will be co-financed by the County with one million kuna a year, and the fast ship with 253 passenger seats that has so far operated from Split to Rogač on the island of Šolta will continue sailing towards Milna on the island of Brač. in Split.This is the result of the initiative of the Split-Dalmatia County, which initiated communication with Jadrolinija and the leaders of the island’s local governments last fall, last year, in order to better connect the islands, extend the tourist regime of high-speed lines to October and the possibility of reducing transport prices on weekends. ”In addition to co-financing the line for the transport of students from Šolta to Split with 1,1 million kuna, the county will also co-finance Krilo shipping company, the concessionaire of the new high-speed line Milna – Rogač – Split, with a return in the evening from Split via Rogač. in Milne. This line will, among other things, during the tourist season allow tourists daily visits from Brac to the island of Solta and vice versaSaid Blaženko Boban, prefect of the Split-Dalmatia County.The carrier is the shipping company Krilo shipping company from Krilo Jesenice, and the line has been established since the beginning of this year. Sailing between Rogač on Šolta and Milna on Brač takes about 20 minutes and this traffic connection between Brač and Šolta will be extremely important in the summer months when many tourists will be able to leave from one island to another and return to their place of residence during the same day. The fast ship on the newly established maritime line will depart from the City Port of Split every day at 18.30 pm and sail to Rogač on Šolta to disembark passengers, and then continue sailing towards Milna on Brač. There, the ship will spend the night and set sail in the morning at 6.25 am to Rogač on Šolta and then towards Split.Source: HRT / HrTurizam.hrlast_img read more

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Brac is directly connected to Ljubljana by air

first_imgBrac Airport is slowly but surely growing from year to year, and certainly as the transport connection is one of the first prerequisites for the best possible tourist development, especially.Tako je ove turističke sezone Brač povezan sa sedam zemalja ( Austrija: Beč, Lienz, Graz, Innsbruck, Belgija: Brussels, Nizozemska: RotterdamFrancuska: Deauville, Luxemburg, Švicarska: Bern ), a upravo zadnnja destinacija na listi je Slovenija tj. Ljubljana.Naime, Brač će biti dva puta tjedno direktno povezan s Ljubljanom, piše Bolinfo. Na stranici kompanije Adria Airways objavljeni su letovi iz Ljubljane za Brač,  dva puta tjedno od 28. travnja 2018., a letovi će biti srijedom i subotom u oba smjera. Na njihovim se  stranicama već mogu kupiti karte i  to od 75 EUR za jedan smjer.Presentation of the tourist offer of the island of Brač in LjubljanaPrecisely on this occasion, ie the introduction of a direct line to Brač, a presentation of the tourist offer of the island of Brač was organized in Ljubljana.The Tourist Boards of the Island of Brač, in cooperation with the Tourist Board of Split-Dalmatia County and Brač Airport, organized a presentation of the tourist offer of the island of Brač, the County and the possibilities of Brač Airport and the promotion of the new Ljubljana-Brač airline.The presentation was attended by 40 media representatives, leading Slovenian tour operators and friends of Brač.Related news: FOR THE FIRST TIME BRAČ AND ŠOLTA CONNECTED BY A SHIP LINEBRAČ AIRPORT EXPANDS AIRCRAFT LANDING OVER WITH ONE HUNDRED PASSENGERSlast_img read more

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During the Christmas and New Year holidays, about 10 percent more tourists are expected than last year

first_imgDuring the Advent period, as well as throughout December, the most visited tourist destination remains the city of Zagreb, which accounts for approximately a third of all arrivals in Croatia, as well as a quarter of total national overnight stays.  “These indicators confirm that Croatia is successful in the affirmation of tourist products that are not related to the summer months, which is a step forward towards achieving a more even annual, but also the spatial distribution of tourist traffic.“Believes the director of the Croatian National Tourist Board, Kristjan Staničić, adding that for several years now this has been the strategic priority of the CNTB. After Zagreb, during the Christmas and New Year period, most tourists expect Adriatic destinations in Istria and Kvarner, as well as Split and Zadar. According to information collected by the system of tourist boards, during the Christmas and New Year holidays, at the level of the whole of Croatia, a growth of tourist traffic of about 10% is expected compared to the same period last year, according to the CNTB.center_img Last year, Croatia recorded 22 tourist arrivals and 2017 overnight stays during the “striking” ten holidays that allow the connection of two “extended” weekends (from 2 December 2018 to 154.000 January 419.000), while during this year’s comparable period (from 21 December 2018 to January 1, 2019) expects a 10 percent better result, which means more than 170.000 arrivals and more than 460.000 overnight stays. This result will be accompanied by a proportionally better occupancy of accommodation facilities. On the “continent”, most tourists, with the exception of Zagreb, expect destinations in Krapina-Zagorje, Međimurje and Karlovac counties, while in the east of our country Osijek leads.last_img read more

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Due to feces in the sea, Ston oysters are infected with the norovirus. The event “Days of Mali Ston oysters” canceled

first_imgTraces of oyster farming in the Mali Ston Bay have existed since the period of Roman rule in this area. The first written documents on shellfish hunting date from the 16th century, and on breeding from the 17th century, records from the time of the Dubrovnik Republic. But today, the “modern man” has managed to make it worse. Who is to blame and how this incident came about is likely to determine the establishment of a special Committee and Commission to deliberate in the coming years and no one will be to blame, as is most often the case. It is best to import oysters and we have solved the problem. As it is pointed out in the part of the waters of the Mali Ston Bay, the presence of Noro virus has been determined in about 30% of seawater and shellfish quality samples. Veterinary inspection confirmed norovirus at three of the five checkpoints, which is highly contagious and most commonly spreads through food or water contaminated with feces during preparation. “Having in mind any health problems that could arise from the consumption of thermally untreated shells, a joint decision was made by the organizers to cancel the aforementioned part of the event.” conclude from the Ston Tourist Board. Photo: Municipality of Ston Due to the feces in the sea, ie the large presence of the Noro virus in the sea in the Ston Bay, one of our TOP events – the Days of the Mali Ston Oyster – was canceled. It is also a big blow to the already weak local economy of the Municipality of Stona, which is keeping its head above water through oyster production and tourism. From oyster growers, restaurants, and thus tourism, everyone will unfortunately bear the consequences, I just hope they will not be long-term. ‘You need to know that one bacterium in the sea means that the concentration in the shell is 20 times higher. These are bacterial bombs, a very serious matter. One should not play with it and one should not eat oysters while so. I’m sorry for the producers, the caterers, the people who love oysters, but that’s the way it is. We screwed ourselves up. It is, of course, the cause, the faeces, it’s all from the mainland’, says Onofri.  center_img Senior Scientific Adviser at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, University of Dubrovnik Vlado Onofri, for Free Dalmatia comments on the new situation with oysters in Mali Ston Bay and connects it with unresolved fecal drainage. “As part of the celebration of the festival of St. Joseph and the Day of the Oyster of Mali Ston, organized by TZO Ston, the Municipality of Ston and the Association of Ston shellfish planned part of the folk festival March 16.3.2019, XNUMX. on the waterfront in Mali Ston for prevention this year was canceled ” report from the Ston Tourist Board. “We shit the sea too”- says a colleague sitting next to me as I write this article. And really, the question arises as to how incapable and careless we must be to bring ourselves into such a position. Especially in the case of Mali Ston Bay which should be at the highest level of protection. We managed to endanger the Mali Ston oyster, which should have been our brand and pride for a long time, because it is made in a top delicacy and aphrodisiac. The reason for the whole story is, of course, not the strategic development of tourism, both on our entire coast and in Ston. Where does all the money from tourism go, if not to the arrangement of cities and municipalities? It is tragic that nowadays, with successful tourism, for decades we have had a problem with sewage, water drainage, electricity… all the basic infrastructural problems. During the tourist season due to the excessive load on the entire infrastructure that cannot withstand the pressure, the city infrastructure cracks at the seams. So the sewer network can withstand the local population, but when you add to that same drain and capacity, hundreds of new apartments and thousands of new residents during the tourist season then everything breaks down. In this case, everything shoots up and goes into the sea that we polluted. TZ Ston How did we get into this situation? Shame. Passionately. Continue string…last_img read more

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Ancient culinary specialties were presented as part of the Lošinj Cuisine Festival

first_imgBy the way, on April 27, the people of Lošinj celebrate “Apoxyomenos’ birthday”, ie the day when the ancient bronze statue of the athlete Apoxyomenos was taken out of the seabed in 1999. On this occasion, the Museum of Apoxyomenos will open its doors free of charge to all visitors (from 10 am to 18 pm). Also, on April 30, 2019, an athletics race will be held in honor of the famous Lošinj bronze resident. Source / photo: The ministry of tourism; Mali Lošinj Tourist Board These are two menus, fish and meat with three courses and a glass of wine. Apart from the famous mythical triad (grain, olives and wine), the foods and spices in the recipes of Lošinj’s cuisine are precisely those that have been confirmed to have been in use in ancient Greece. You can find more about the event HERE. Restaurants that participate in the Festival and where you can try the specialties are: Restaurant Artatore, Inn Baracuda, Restaurant Bocca Vera, Tavern Bonifačić, Tavern Cigale, Deveron gastro pub, Restaurant Diana, Restaurant Eki, Restaurant Marina, Restaurant Poljana, Restaurant Punta, Tavern Silvana, Restaurant Televrin, Restaurant Veli žal and Restaurant Za Kantuni. „13. Lošinj Cuisine Festival “organized by the City of Mali Lošinj and the Tourist Board of the City of Mali Lošinj, 15 Lošinj restaurants, 3 winemakers and students of Ambroz Haračić High School on Malološinj Square today presented specialties from foods used in antiquity. From April 15 to May 25, 25, 2019 Lošinj catering facilities will offer these same specialties to their guests, reports the Ministry of Tourism. The opening of this year’s “13. Festivities of Lošinj cuisine “will be held as part of the” KeyQ + festival “from 25-27. April 2019. “KeyQ ​​+ – culture and tourism as keys to quality for cross-border development of Italy and Croatia” is a project aimed at developing a unique tourism product based on common cultural and culinary heritage that connects Croatian and Italian border regions and research and discovery of tastes, smells and customs of rural areas. surround the northern Adriatic.last_img read more

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