Stressed out and anxious? How to cope during the COVID-19 pandemic

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Relaxed calm young woman lounging sitting in comfortable wooden rocking chair breathing fresh air dreaming, happy lazy girl chilling relaxing enjoying no stress free peaceful quiet weekend at home From the Orange County Newsroom Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSCoping SkillsCOVID-19Mental HealthOrange County Government FloridaPandemic Previous articleEveryone’s buzzing about virtual haircutsNext articleFlorida scores haul of N95 masks, other medical supplies Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. The health-threatening nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, along with the social distancing, is creating a toxic environment for many. Add in stay-at-home mandates and self-isolation and it should come as no surprise that a major increase in anxiety is affecting many throughout Orange County. Please enter your name herecenter_img The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter “We’ve never experienced anything like this before because although there have been more severe pandemics throughout history, the world is a much more connected place today,” said Philip Toal, ED.D., LMHC, senior vice president for Orlando-based Aspire Health Partners. “We can get on an airplane and infect people all over the world, plus with social media we’re getting a constant barrage of information that many of us find difficult to absorb, thus heightening our sense of stress and anxiety.”Toal, who stresses we are all in the same boat and in this together, recommends the following strategies for coping with COVID-19-related stress and anxiety:Know Your Response to Stress. To accurately determine how the pandemic is affecting you, you must understand how you respond to stress and stressful situations. Everyone is different, so learn how to identify when your stress level is going up, and get comfortable with recognizing this. If you find yourself disengaging, for example, you know you’re stressed, and you can take steps to reduce it.Allow Breaks from the News. Take time away from news cycles and the constant barrage of information coming your way. Give yourself some quiet time. Distract yourself — listen to music, watch a movie, read, bake a cake, write in a journal, do some yard work. Engage in these activities and don’t forget what works for you.Engage in Regular Exercise. Take a walk around the block or go for a bike ride. If you have a dog, it’s a great excuse to go for walks. Come up with exercise routines you can do in your house.Get Regular Rest. Stress negatively impacts sleep, and getting proper sleep is critical to maintain good mental health. Try to keep as much of a routine schedule as you can so your sleep patterns are steady.Reach out for Support. Especially for the elderly and singles, isolation can be very stressful. We can’t go to work, church or a restaurant to socialize right now, so be sure to reach out to friends and family via phone call, video conferencing, etc. This is when technology can be a positive.Things Will Get Better. Remember, even though things are uncertain, the pandemic is time-limited. This is a virus, and viruses run their course. Additionally, doctors are working on treatments and finding a cure.Give Your Family Needed Space. If you’re with family members during Stay at Home orders, recognize your differences and what they need — alone time, down time, exercise — and respect that amongst each other. As much as we love our families, we can still get on each other’s nerves.Embrace Family Togetherness. Take this opportunity to engage with your family in different ways. Besides eating meals together, you can binge watch movies/TV shows, play cards/board games, or do a home improvement project together. Remember, this is your chance to become closer.Talk about Your Feelings. Remember to communicate how you’re feeling to your family and close friends. Share your fears, concerns and anxieties about the pandemic. Talking it through helps.Explore New Hobbies and Activities. Creative activities, such as arts and crafts, move you to the right side of your brain and are healing in nature. So try painting or drawing, or maybe start writing that book you’ve always wanted to write. Explore … and see where it takes you.Behavioral Health Resources:Heart of Florida United Way’s 2-1-1 crisis call line or Aspire Health Partners at 407-875-3700, extension 2. Both are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.The Mental Health Association of Central Florida has a referral line — 407-898-0110 — and an online tool to help residents in Orange, Osceola and Seminole counties find counselors. The center is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.Peer Support Space, a local grass-roots nonprofit led by people in recovery for mental health and substance abuse challenges, has support groups meeting virtually during the stay-at-home mandate and other resources. Go to peersupportspace.org/covid-response.NAMI Greater Orlando has an information helpline open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at 407-253-1900. The organization also has begun offering online support groups.To make an appointment for behavioral health services at Community Health Centers in Orange or Lake counties, call 407-905-8827 or 352-314-7400 weekdays during normal business hours.For the national Disaster Distress Helpline, available 24-7, call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746. People with deafness or hearing loss can use their preferred relay service to call 1-800-985-5990.For the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, available 24-7, call 1-800-273-8255. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment!last_img read more

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What To Do This Weekend in Pasadena

first_img Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Uncategorized What To Do This Weekend in Pasadena Published on Thursday, January 19, 2017 | 12:59 pm Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Herbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeauty Top of the News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Business Newscenter_img Community News Subscribe Community News More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday First Heatwave Expected Next Week Here are our carefully culled top picks from dozens of Pasadena events – the very best things to taste, watch, listen to, and experience, all presented weekly in our e!Pasadena email newsletter: Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website last_img read more

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Increase recorded in those signing on in Donegal

first_img Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Need for issues with Mica redress scheme to be addressed raised in Seanad also WhatsApp Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme Increase recorded in those signing on in Donegal Google+ Twitter Previous articleBurnfoot company confirms the creation of 70 new jobsNext articleInishowen cross-border out of hours GP service not being used News Highland Facebook Today’s announcement of new jobs in Burnfoot comes as a breakdown of live register figures for last month show that the number signing on in Donegal increased by 395 in a month.However comparing May 2010 to May of last year the number increased by 2,347.Last month there was 21,391 people signing on the live register in Donegal, that is an increase of 12% when compared to May of 2009.All welfare offices across the county bar one recorded a month on month increase.The biggest increase in those signing on was in Letterkenny – from April to May the figure increased by 3.5% bringing the total to 5,796.Once again the number on the dole in Inishowen increased – up 80 to 4,978. There was also a notable increase in the Finn Valley, 70 extra people signed on last month, while in Ballyshannon the number increased by 43.Elsewhere there were more modest increases – Killybegs went up by six, Dungloe 13, and Dunfanaghy four.The only decrease  recorded was in Donegal Town where the number signing on for May was 1,359 – 15 people down from April. Minister McConalogue says he is working to improve fishing quota Facebookcenter_img Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton By News Highland – June 4, 2010 Newsx Adverts Twitter Google+ 70% of Cllrs nationwide threatened, harassed and intimidated over past 3 years – Report Pinterestlast_img read more

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“Problem Is In Delhi As Both Centre & State Think It Is Theirs”: Delhi High Court On Covid-19 Management In Capital

first_imgNews Updates”Problem Is In Delhi As Both Centre & State Think It Is Theirs”: Delhi High Court On Covid-19 Management In Capital Srishti Ojha12 May 2021 9:09 AMShare This – xHearing a batch of pleas on various aspects of the management of the Covid-19 pandemic in the national capital, the Delhi High Court which has been hearing the pleas for nearly 3 weeks now, today remarked, “The problem is in Delhi because both Centre and State think Delhi is theirs.”To this, Sr. Adv. Rahul Mehra, responded stating that the Centre should not just think but also “act like Delhi is theirs,” and further alleged that Delhi has seen oversight by the Centre in Covid-19 matters from day 1, even as the court repeated that they should not stoop to the level of “squabbling”. The centre responded by saying that these were allegations leveled on a “daily basis” that would serve to “lower the level of the court” unless checked.The court was on the issue of discrimination alleged by Delhi government in terms of distribution of medical equipments that have been received by India from foreign nations to specific hospitals only. Mehra appearing for Delhi said, “I’d like to flag one thing… Union of India is giving infrastructure to hospitals not available to Delhi citizens. They could have given to private hospitals, we aren’t saying give to Delhi government hospitals.”Mehra emphasized that the amicus curiae Sr. Adv. Rajshekhar Rao had also stated that infrastructure was only given by the Centre to these select hospitals, which infact have very little capacity.Delhi government further alleged that though it had started writing to the Centre on May 4 itself, and multiple times thereafter, the Centre had not changed its decision.Upon the submission the court directed Additional Solicitor General Chetan Sharma appearing for the Centre to look into the issue, upon which he replied that Delhi’s allegations were vague and it needed to be shown how discrimination is being made.Rao interjected to explain at this point, “Discrimination would be an inappropriate term. What we were saying is if someone is applying their mind to ensure that aid is going to places that need it, rather than those that already have it.”Taking note of the allegations, and facts, the bench observed, “On one hand many central hospitals haven’t given beds for Covid. We aren’t saying that you give it, because non-Covid hospitals are also required.”It however directed the Centre to look into the issue, warning that the Centre should not just give Delhi N-95 masks in terms of Covid-19 aid, and that while it would pass an order on the matter, the Centre should try to remedy the situation before that.The bench has further directed the centre to “make a compilation with details as to what aid was received and was was given to Delhi and to which hospitals.”Edited by Shreya Agarwal TagsDelhi High Court Covid-19 Central Government Delhi Government Next Storylast_img read more

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Donegal comes out on top in this years Blue Flag Awards!

first_img Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Twitter By News Highland – June 9, 2020 WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook WhatsApp Google+ Pinterest Donegal comes out on top in this years Blue Flag Awards! Twitter Google+center_img Donegal has come out on top in this years An Taisce Blue Flag and green coasts awards.The programme aims to raise environmental awareness and promote sound environmental management of beaches, marinas and inland bathing waters around the world.The 80 Irish beaches and 10 marinas that have achieved this accolade must adhere to specific criteria related to water quality, information provision, environmental education, safety and site management.With 12 beaches and 2 marinas getting top marks, Donegal is the county with the most Blue Flags for 2020.They are: Bundoran, Rossnowlagh, Murvagh, Fintra, Portnoo/Narin, Carrickfinn, Killahoey, Marblehill, Downings, Portsalon, Culdaff, Stroove, Greencastle Marina and Rathmullan Marina.Bundoran has regained Blue Flag status having lost it in 2019.Meanwhile, the areas in Donegal which received the Green coast award are: Dooey, Magheroarty, Drumatinney and Ballyheirnan.Coastal Awards Manager with An Taisce, Ian Diamond says it is no mean feat being awarded such an accolade:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/diamond5pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Previous articleFormer auxiliary Bishop of Derry, Francis Lagan has diedNext articlePriests told to wear face masks when distributing Communion News Highland Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Facebook AudioHomepage BannerNews Community Enhancement Programme open for applications RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Sister Schubert

first_img Print Article Paula Hinson is the new culinary arts teacher at Charles Henderson High School.She is getting to know her students and they are getting to know her.And, that’s important. But what’s also important is for the students who chose to enroll in the Culinary Arts Academy to realize that the academy is not just a way to learn to cook. It’s a beginning path that can lead to a very successful future in the food service industry – if they choose to follow it. “I wanted them to hear from someone who had a dream about a career in the food service industry and made that dream come true,” Hinson said. “Sister Schubert is a hometown girl and Sister Schubert’s Homemade Rolls actually started in her kitchen right here in Troy.”Barnes spoke to the students in the introductory class and those in Culinary Arts I and II.She told them how her grandmother taught her to make wonderful Parkerhouse style rolls when she was a young girl. Barnes said she tried several careers but cooking and baking were her passion.“I was never happier than when I was preparing food for my family and friends,” she said. “By 1989, I was running a little bitty catering business that I called The Silver Spoon. Everyone raved about the Parkerhouse style rolls that I baked using the old family recipe I inherited from my grandmother.” Sponsored Content Email the author Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Published 9:24 pm Friday, August 21, 2009 Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration “For the first couple of weeks, I wanted the students to learn more about the food service industry and the many opportunities that are available to them in that industry,” Hinson said. “Too often, students think that the food service industry just offers jobs as waiters, waitresses and cooks. They don’t know that there are exciting opportunities on cruise ships, at resort area restaurants, in hotels, conference centers, and just so many places. Chefs are highly trained and are in demand. For those who enjoy working with food, there are many opportunities and I wanted them to know that.”Hinson decided the best way for the students to learn about the food service industry and the opportunities for those who think big, work hard and believe in themselves was from one who had done just that.She invited Patricia “Sister Schubert” Barnes, founder of Sister Schubert’s Homemade Rolls based in Luverne, to speak to the students. You Might Like The Pickin’ Place Harwood Daughtry brushed aside a cluster of bright yellow four o’clocks and tugged slightly at the sliding glass door to… read more Sister Schubert By Jaine Treadwell That year, a friend asked Barnes to donate a few pans of rolls to a local church’s holiday frozen food fair. She sold 20 pans and people placed orders for the next year. She had to cut off orders at 200 pans that year and 300 in 1991.“I sat down after that third holiday fair and said to myself, ‘If the people in Troy like my rolls, maybe other folks will, too.’”Sister Schubert’s Homemade Rolls was born because a hometown girl dared to dream.Barnes told the students that the food service industry is a varied, interesting and challenging one.“We live in the most food-safety conscious country in the world,” she said. “Everything that we do is done with safety in mind. We are USDA inspected and it’s strict. When you visit some other countries and see the way their food is handled, it makes you really appreciate the efforts that we make to ensure that our food is prepared safely.”The students’ eyes widened when Barnes explained that the dough she works with is “alive.”“It’s working and it’s creating,” she said. “I compare it to a bear that’s in hibernation. When the dough ‘wakes up,’ it’s not too happy but it makes the most wonderful bread.”The students were invited into the kitchen where Barnes demonstrated the art of baking Sister Schubert’s Homemade Rolls. They each had an opportunity to roll the dough, cut and double-fold the rolls, sprinkle on cinnamon and give the rolls a butter bath.“I love baking the rolls almost as much as eating them,” Barnes said. However, when the rolls came out of the oven, the students seemed to enjoy the eating just a bit more.After a good, hearty “taste” of the food service industry, Barnes challenged the students to follow their dreams as she did.“I love what I do,” she said. “We have a wonderful working environment at Sister Schubert Homemade Rolls. And, I’m so happy and excited to be there. Every day is a blessing. That’s what I hope you will do. Find something that you really love to do and do it.“Don’t be afraid to try things. I tried my idea. You try yours. Make it happen. Do what you love. Believe in yourself. Don’t count on someone else to make it happen for you. Do it yourself. You make it happen. If you love what you do, you will be happy and those around you will pick up on that happiness. So, find what you love to do and make it happen.” By The Penny Hoarder The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Latest Stories Skiplast_img read more

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Role of squid in the Southern Ocean pelagic ecosystem and the possible consequences of climate change

first_imgSouthern Ocean squid are important predators and prey and are a potential fishery resource. Their future under climate change is analysed from predictions of change by 2100 and assessments of the effects on squid biology. There are ∼18 Antarctic species of squid. Young feed primarily on crustaceans and switch later to fishes. They are preyed on by odontocetes, seals and seabirds – which together consume ∼34×106 t yr−1 – and fish. As predators, squid are second to fish as biomass producers but recent evidence suggests predator consumption of squid needs to be reassessed. Fatty acid composition and stable nitrogen isotope ratios indicate some predators consume less squid in their diet than gut contents data suggest. Southern Ocean oceanography is unique in having circumpolar circulation and frontal systems and at high latitudes it is heavily influenced by sea ice. The Antarctic Peninsula is among the fastest warming regions worldwide but elsewhere the Southern Ocean is warming more slowly and the Ross Sea is probably cooling. Sea ice is receding in the Peninsula region and increasing elsewhere. Modelled predictions for 2100 suggest although the Southern Ocean will warm less than other oceans and sea ice will reduce. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current may shift slightly southwards with intensification of westerly winds but resolution of the models is insufficient to predict mesoscale change. Globally, pH of seawater has decreased by 0.1 units since the mid-1900s and is predicted to decrease by another 0.5 units by 2100. Impact on calcifying organisms will be high in the cold Southern Ocean where solubility of calcium carbonate is high. Predicted temperature increases are unlikely to have major effects on squid other than changes in distribution near the limits of their range; acidification may have greater impact. Small changes in large scale circulation are unlikely to affect squid but changes in mesoscale oceanography may have high impact. Change in sea ice extent may not have a direct effect but consequent ecosystem changes could have a major impact. Cephalopods are ecological opportunists adapted to exploit favourable environmental conditions. Given their potential to evolve fast, change in the Southern Ocean pelagic ecosystem might act in their favour.last_img read more

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Ten colleges not paying real Living Wage

first_imgCherwell’s investigation has also shown that at least 17 colleges and PPHs now have formal accreditation from the Living Wage Foundation, which means that they are formally committed to paying the real Living Wage. Despite the basic rate being less than £9.30 per hour, some colleges pointed out that they offered a number of benefits which provided for a total package that exceeded the real Living Wage. Wolfson College, for instance, listed amongst a long list of benefits a £200 Christmas bonus to all staff, meals whilst on duty, as well as 11 holiday days over the statutory allowance, which they claim is the equivalent to £792 per annum for a full-time employee paid £9 per hour. A spokesperson from Wolfson College told Cherwell that the basic benefits used by all staff are worth “almost £7,000, which translates into an additional £3.30 per hour on average.” A Cherwell investigation has found that at least ten Oxford colleges were still not paying the real Living Wage of £9.30 per hour to all of their permanent employees and casual workers as of 16th December 2020. Balliol, Brasenose, Exeter, St Anthony’s, St Edmund Hall, and St John’s College stressed that it is only casual workers who are not paid the real Living Wage, and that all permanent employees are paid at least £9.30 per hour. In some cases, holiday uplift for casual workers effectively took the hourly rate to above £9.30 per hour. Balliol, Brasenose, Exeter, Keble, St Anthony’s, St Catherine’s, St Edmund Hall, St John’s, Trinity, and Wolfson were all paying their lowest-earning adult workers a basic wage of less than £9.30 per hour, whilst Magdalen and Wadham have not yet responded.  A spokesperson from the Oxford City Living Wage Campaign (OCLWC) told Cherwell: “Most of the low paid, insecurely employed (“temporary”) staff who work in Oxford University Colleges are working class, female, and BAME people. Many are migrant workers who do not speak English as a first language. Image credit: SJPrice / Pixabay Many colleges are still far off paying all their workers a base rate of the OWL. As of 16 December 2020, 53% of adult employees, including casual workers, employed by Corpus Christi College in non-academic and non-administrative positions were paid below £10.21 per hour. At Lady Margaret Hall this figure was 53.98%, at St Catherine’s 56%, and at St Edmund Hall 59%. The Oxford Living Wage (OLW) is an hourly minimum wage which recognises the high cost of living in Oxford and is set annually at 95% of the London Living Wage. The University of Oxford announced last February that it was committing to paying all its employees at least the Oxford Living Wage. However, since Oxford colleges are independent employers, they were left to make their own decisions about the OLW. All Souls, Blackfriars, Campion Hall, Green Templeton, Kellogg, Merton, St Benet’s, and St Cross College were all paying at least the Oxford Living Wage of £10.21 per hour to all their workers and employees as of 16th December 2020. The lack of conferences this past year will have impacted some college staff, with many colleges usually offering conference bonuses for staff involved in delivering these. St Anne’s College told Cherwell: “The college under normal circumstances pays a cash bonus to some of its lower paid bursary staff. This did not occur in 2020 because of the effect of the pandemic on its conference business.” The real Living Wage was increased in November 2020 to £9.50 per hour, meaning that the 17 colleges and PPHs who are accredited Living Wage Employers will have to increase their minimum hourly wage to £9.50 by 9th May 2021 at the latest. Several other colleges, despite not having formal accreditation, say that they are committed to paying in line with the recommendations of the Living Wage Foundation. “One of the main lessons of the coronavirus crisis has been to re-evaluate the status of so called unskilled and semi-skilled workers now that their economic contribution is shown to be “essential” and pivotal to the functioning of society and the economy.” A spokesperson from Oxford City Council told Cherwell: “The Oxford Living Wage has been created to promote liveable earnings for workers. It reflects the fact that Oxford is one of the most expensive cities to live in the UK, and helps accredited employers demonstrate they value their workforce. With expensive housing in the city, many workers have to choose between spending more money to live in the city, or more on travel to get to work.” The real Living Wage is different from the government’s national living wage, which was introduced in April 2016 for all staff over 25 and is currently set at £8.72 per hour. The Living Wage Foundation’s website states: “This wage [the national living wage] is not calculated according to what employees and their families need to live. […] The real Living Wage rates are higher because they are independently-calculated based on what people need to get by.” Furthermore, the real Living Wage covers all staff aged 18 and over. In contrast, some colleges have recognised the negative impact of the pandemic on staff and offered additional benefits as a result. Green Templeton paid a pandemic bonus of at least £100 in November 2020, whilst Linacre paid a flat rate bonus of £500 in November 2020 to “all staff in employment on 1 November 2020 who were on a contract of 1 year or more in duration and were of university grade 9 or below […] in recognition of the commitment of all staff to overcoming the challenges caused by COVID 19.” Philip Parker from the Conference of Colleges told Cherwell: “staff have been supported through the pandemic with jobs kept open and full pay maintained for furloughed staff, despite the very significant losses of revenue that colleges have incurred.” The OCLWC called on “all Oxford University Colleges and institutions to harmonise their employment protocols around common wage rates at or above the OLW and to extend full employment protection to everyone who works at the University of Oxford, it’s colleges, partner institutions or [as] contractors. “Such reforms would also lead to greater efficiency and provide visible and statistical evidence of Oxford University Colleges’ desire to change and redress historical injustices.” Philip Parker, Chair of the Estates Bursars Committee for the Conference of Colleges told Cherwell: “College employees receive generous benefits that are not included in hourly pay calculations, including longer holidays, valuable pensions and free meals. In addition, the college data will often include students who work for the college in vacations, for example to support outreach work or commercial conferences; these students usually get subsidised accommodation.”last_img read more

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Ocean City Education Foundation Raises Funds For School Grants

first_imgBy Maddy VitaleA Smart Board, pottery wheels, even desk cycles, are just some of the items the Ocean City Education Foundation supplied through grants for teachers in district schools in recent years. “We really want to cover all bases with the kids,” said Tricia Ciliberto, president of the independent foundation. “We give them some good stuff. Every time I go into the school for a meeting, I am just impressed. I am proud to be in an organization in which I could help in any way possible.”Every year the education foundation holds two fundraisers to be able to award grants to the district, one in December and the other in March.This year’s event, Benefit by the Beach, will be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, March 2, at the historic Flanders hotel, 719 E. 11th Street in Ocean City. Tickets are $45. For more information visit the http://ocnjef.com/Last April, $10,000 in grants were awarded to teachers during a ceremony at the Board of Education office. Ciliberto said she hopes the foundation raises even more money this year through fundraising to present even more awards to teachers this spring.Although the grants are “mini-grants,” the foundation members want to help in any way they can, Ciliberto, of Upper Township, said. “It is easy to want to help kids. We all know how the school budgets are. There are things that can enhance the education that can’t fit into a budget,” Ciliberto said. “We try to help that. We have a fantastic district and we want to do anything we can to make it even better.”The foundation, which began 10 years ago, is made up of 15 people including teachers, administrators, parents, business owners, and residents in the school district. It was formed to enhance and expand enrichment opportunities for all students in the Ocean City School District and the community. “Some people are members who had children in the schools. Others don’t, but know it is important to invest in the future of the town and the children are the future,” she said.While funds are raised for other needs in the community, the main goal of the organization is to provide grants to teachers, she said. In January a letter goes out to all teachers in the district, inviting them to submit grant requests. The requests due back a couple of weeks ago, are being reviewed by a grant committee, made up of members of the foundation.Some grants, ranging from a couple of hundred dollars to a couple thousand dollars, awarded last year are as follows; Sign Language program materials, mannequins for a fashion marketing course, headphones for iPads, camera equipment and a computer coding kit were some items awarded through grant funds.“The amount in grants we can give out is contingent upon how much is raised through our fundraisers,” Ciliberto said. “Everything we raise is given back to the school. “We try to raise money for different things.” In addition to grants for the classroom work, after Hurricane Sandy, the foundation raised money to pay for school lunches for children displaced by the storm. “If there is a need in the community, we want to help in any way we can,” Ciliberto said.Last spring the foundation raised funds to purchase bike reflectors for children in the community. They also sponsor the after-prom events.“Even if they don’t go to our school, they are still our kids,” Ciliberto said. “We really care about the kids inside and outside of the school.” The Ocean City Education Foundation is hosting a fundraiser March 2 at the historic Flanders hotel in Ocean City to raise funds for grants. The Ocean City Education Foundation awards teachers, including these 2017 recipients, grants for needed items. The organization hopes to raise thousands at a March 2 fundraiser to provide more educational materials for the district.last_img read more

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Man dies in single-vehicle crash in Marshall County

first_img Twitter Facebook Facebook WhatsApp Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Man dies in single-vehicle crash in Marshall County Previous articleMishawaka woman arrested after man was found hit by a carNext articleLaPorte police investigating double shooting Tommie Lee IndianaLocalNews By Tommie Lee – March 30, 2020 0 324 (95.3 MNC) The Marshall County Sheriff’s Department is investigating a single vehicle crash in Plymouth that led to the death of a man from Monterey, Indiana.Deputies say it happened in the 12,000 block of State Road 17 at 12th Road shortly before 9 p.m. Saturday night.It’s believed the vehicle failed to negotiate a curve and hit a tree. 60 year-old William Zehner was thrown from the vehicle and pronounced dead at the scene. Google+ Pinterest Google+last_img read more

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