Role of squid in the Southern Ocean pelagic ecosystem and the possible consequences of climate change

first_imgSouthern Ocean squid are important predators and prey and are a potential fishery resource. Their future under climate change is analysed from predictions of change by 2100 and assessments of the effects on squid biology. There are ∼18 Antarctic species of squid. Young feed primarily on crustaceans and switch later to fishes. They are preyed on by odontocetes, seals and seabirds – which together consume ∼34×106 t yr−1 – and fish. As predators, squid are second to fish as biomass producers but recent evidence suggests predator consumption of squid needs to be reassessed. Fatty acid composition and stable nitrogen isotope ratios indicate some predators consume less squid in their diet than gut contents data suggest. Southern Ocean oceanography is unique in having circumpolar circulation and frontal systems and at high latitudes it is heavily influenced by sea ice. The Antarctic Peninsula is among the fastest warming regions worldwide but elsewhere the Southern Ocean is warming more slowly and the Ross Sea is probably cooling. Sea ice is receding in the Peninsula region and increasing elsewhere. Modelled predictions for 2100 suggest although the Southern Ocean will warm less than other oceans and sea ice will reduce. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current may shift slightly southwards with intensification of westerly winds but resolution of the models is insufficient to predict mesoscale change. Globally, pH of seawater has decreased by 0.1 units since the mid-1900s and is predicted to decrease by another 0.5 units by 2100. Impact on calcifying organisms will be high in the cold Southern Ocean where solubility of calcium carbonate is high. Predicted temperature increases are unlikely to have major effects on squid other than changes in distribution near the limits of their range; acidification may have greater impact. Small changes in large scale circulation are unlikely to affect squid but changes in mesoscale oceanography may have high impact. Change in sea ice extent may not have a direct effect but consequent ecosystem changes could have a major impact. Cephalopods are ecological opportunists adapted to exploit favourable environmental conditions. Given their potential to evolve fast, change in the Southern Ocean pelagic ecosystem might act in their favour.last_img read more

Read More →

Ten colleges not paying real Living Wage

first_imgCherwell’s investigation has also shown that at least 17 colleges and PPHs now have formal accreditation from the Living Wage Foundation, which means that they are formally committed to paying the real Living Wage. Despite the basic rate being less than £9.30 per hour, some colleges pointed out that they offered a number of benefits which provided for a total package that exceeded the real Living Wage. Wolfson College, for instance, listed amongst a long list of benefits a £200 Christmas bonus to all staff, meals whilst on duty, as well as 11 holiday days over the statutory allowance, which they claim is the equivalent to £792 per annum for a full-time employee paid £9 per hour. A spokesperson from Wolfson College told Cherwell that the basic benefits used by all staff are worth “almost £7,000, which translates into an additional £3.30 per hour on average.” A Cherwell investigation has found that at least ten Oxford colleges were still not paying the real Living Wage of £9.30 per hour to all of their permanent employees and casual workers as of 16th December 2020. Balliol, Brasenose, Exeter, St Anthony’s, St Edmund Hall, and St John’s College stressed that it is only casual workers who are not paid the real Living Wage, and that all permanent employees are paid at least £9.30 per hour. In some cases, holiday uplift for casual workers effectively took the hourly rate to above £9.30 per hour. Balliol, Brasenose, Exeter, Keble, St Anthony’s, St Catherine’s, St Edmund Hall, St John’s, Trinity, and Wolfson were all paying their lowest-earning adult workers a basic wage of less than £9.30 per hour, whilst Magdalen and Wadham have not yet responded.  A spokesperson from the Oxford City Living Wage Campaign (OCLWC) told Cherwell: “Most of the low paid, insecurely employed (“temporary”) staff who work in Oxford University Colleges are working class, female, and BAME people. Many are migrant workers who do not speak English as a first language. Image credit: SJPrice / Pixabay Many colleges are still far off paying all their workers a base rate of the OWL. As of 16 December 2020, 53% of adult employees, including casual workers, employed by Corpus Christi College in non-academic and non-administrative positions were paid below £10.21 per hour. At Lady Margaret Hall this figure was 53.98%, at St Catherine’s 56%, and at St Edmund Hall 59%. The Oxford Living Wage (OLW) is an hourly minimum wage which recognises the high cost of living in Oxford and is set annually at 95% of the London Living Wage. The University of Oxford announced last February that it was committing to paying all its employees at least the Oxford Living Wage. However, since Oxford colleges are independent employers, they were left to make their own decisions about the OLW. All Souls, Blackfriars, Campion Hall, Green Templeton, Kellogg, Merton, St Benet’s, and St Cross College were all paying at least the Oxford Living Wage of £10.21 per hour to all their workers and employees as of 16th December 2020. The lack of conferences this past year will have impacted some college staff, with many colleges usually offering conference bonuses for staff involved in delivering these. St Anne’s College told Cherwell: “The college under normal circumstances pays a cash bonus to some of its lower paid bursary staff. This did not occur in 2020 because of the effect of the pandemic on its conference business.” The real Living Wage was increased in November 2020 to £9.50 per hour, meaning that the 17 colleges and PPHs who are accredited Living Wage Employers will have to increase their minimum hourly wage to £9.50 by 9th May 2021 at the latest. Several other colleges, despite not having formal accreditation, say that they are committed to paying in line with the recommendations of the Living Wage Foundation. “One of the main lessons of the coronavirus crisis has been to re-evaluate the status of so called unskilled and semi-skilled workers now that their economic contribution is shown to be “essential” and pivotal to the functioning of society and the economy.” A spokesperson from Oxford City Council told Cherwell: “The Oxford Living Wage has been created to promote liveable earnings for workers. It reflects the fact that Oxford is one of the most expensive cities to live in the UK, and helps accredited employers demonstrate they value their workforce. With expensive housing in the city, many workers have to choose between spending more money to live in the city, or more on travel to get to work.” The real Living Wage is different from the government’s national living wage, which was introduced in April 2016 for all staff over 25 and is currently set at £8.72 per hour. The Living Wage Foundation’s website states: “This wage [the national living wage] is not calculated according to what employees and their families need to live. […] The real Living Wage rates are higher because they are independently-calculated based on what people need to get by.” Furthermore, the real Living Wage covers all staff aged 18 and over. In contrast, some colleges have recognised the negative impact of the pandemic on staff and offered additional benefits as a result. Green Templeton paid a pandemic bonus of at least £100 in November 2020, whilst Linacre paid a flat rate bonus of £500 in November 2020 to “all staff in employment on 1 November 2020 who were on a contract of 1 year or more in duration and were of university grade 9 or below […] in recognition of the commitment of all staff to overcoming the challenges caused by COVID 19.” Philip Parker from the Conference of Colleges told Cherwell: “staff have been supported through the pandemic with jobs kept open and full pay maintained for furloughed staff, despite the very significant losses of revenue that colleges have incurred.” The OCLWC called on “all Oxford University Colleges and institutions to harmonise their employment protocols around common wage rates at or above the OLW and to extend full employment protection to everyone who works at the University of Oxford, it’s colleges, partner institutions or [as] contractors. “Such reforms would also lead to greater efficiency and provide visible and statistical evidence of Oxford University Colleges’ desire to change and redress historical injustices.” Philip Parker, Chair of the Estates Bursars Committee for the Conference of Colleges told Cherwell: “College employees receive generous benefits that are not included in hourly pay calculations, including longer holidays, valuable pensions and free meals. In addition, the college data will often include students who work for the college in vacations, for example to support outreach work or commercial conferences; these students usually get subsidised accommodation.”last_img read more

Read More →

Ocean City Education Foundation Raises Funds For School Grants

first_imgBy Maddy VitaleA Smart Board, pottery wheels, even desk cycles, are just some of the items the Ocean City Education Foundation supplied through grants for teachers in district schools in recent years. “We really want to cover all bases with the kids,” said Tricia Ciliberto, president of the independent foundation. “We give them some good stuff. Every time I go into the school for a meeting, I am just impressed. I am proud to be in an organization in which I could help in any way possible.”Every year the education foundation holds two fundraisers to be able to award grants to the district, one in December and the other in March.This year’s event, Benefit by the Beach, will be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, March 2, at the historic Flanders hotel, 719 E. 11th Street in Ocean City. Tickets are $45. For more information visit the http://ocnjef.com/Last April, $10,000 in grants were awarded to teachers during a ceremony at the Board of Education office. Ciliberto said she hopes the foundation raises even more money this year through fundraising to present even more awards to teachers this spring.Although the grants are “mini-grants,” the foundation members want to help in any way they can, Ciliberto, of Upper Township, said. “It is easy to want to help kids. We all know how the school budgets are. There are things that can enhance the education that can’t fit into a budget,” Ciliberto said. “We try to help that. We have a fantastic district and we want to do anything we can to make it even better.”The foundation, which began 10 years ago, is made up of 15 people including teachers, administrators, parents, business owners, and residents in the school district. It was formed to enhance and expand enrichment opportunities for all students in the Ocean City School District and the community. “Some people are members who had children in the schools. Others don’t, but know it is important to invest in the future of the town and the children are the future,” she said.While funds are raised for other needs in the community, the main goal of the organization is to provide grants to teachers, she said. In January a letter goes out to all teachers in the district, inviting them to submit grant requests. The requests due back a couple of weeks ago, are being reviewed by a grant committee, made up of members of the foundation.Some grants, ranging from a couple of hundred dollars to a couple thousand dollars, awarded last year are as follows; Sign Language program materials, mannequins for a fashion marketing course, headphones for iPads, camera equipment and a computer coding kit were some items awarded through grant funds.“The amount in grants we can give out is contingent upon how much is raised through our fundraisers,” Ciliberto said. “Everything we raise is given back to the school. “We try to raise money for different things.” In addition to grants for the classroom work, after Hurricane Sandy, the foundation raised money to pay for school lunches for children displaced by the storm. “If there is a need in the community, we want to help in any way we can,” Ciliberto said.Last spring the foundation raised funds to purchase bike reflectors for children in the community. They also sponsor the after-prom events.“Even if they don’t go to our school, they are still our kids,” Ciliberto said. “We really care about the kids inside and outside of the school.” The Ocean City Education Foundation is hosting a fundraiser March 2 at the historic Flanders hotel in Ocean City to raise funds for grants. The Ocean City Education Foundation awards teachers, including these 2017 recipients, grants for needed items. The organization hopes to raise thousands at a March 2 fundraiser to provide more educational materials for the district.last_img read more

Read More →

Man dies in single-vehicle crash in Marshall County

first_img Twitter Facebook Facebook WhatsApp Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Man dies in single-vehicle crash in Marshall County Previous articleMishawaka woman arrested after man was found hit by a carNext articleLaPorte police investigating double shooting Tommie Lee IndianaLocalNews By Tommie Lee – March 30, 2020 0 324 (95.3 MNC) The Marshall County Sheriff’s Department is investigating a single vehicle crash in Plymouth that led to the death of a man from Monterey, Indiana.Deputies say it happened in the 12,000 block of State Road 17 at 12th Road shortly before 9 p.m. Saturday night.It’s believed the vehicle failed to negotiate a curve and hit a tree. 60 year-old William Zehner was thrown from the vehicle and pronounced dead at the scene. Google+ Pinterest Google+last_img read more

Read More →

More tips on how to avoid a heart attack while shoveling snow

first_img Previous articleI&M crews helping restore power in storm ravaged West VirginiaNext articleCity launches new business growth program, Scaling Up! South Bend Network Indiana Facebook By Network Indiana – February 17, 2021 0 199 WhatsApp Twitter Pinterest Pinterest Google+ WhatsApp More tips on how to avoid a heart attack while shoveling snow Twitter (Sam Householder/The Elkhart Truth) Shoveling snow can trigger a heart attack.“Shoveling snow is significant exercise,” said IU Health Cardiologist, Dr. Kyle Frick. “So, if your heart’s not used to that, that could put undue stress on the heart if you all of a sudden decide to wake up and shovel a significant amount of snow from your driveway.He said if you haven’t been putting your heart under this kind of stress before you could have symptoms that might surprise you.The classic symptoms for a heart attack are chest pain, shortness of breath, or shoulder pain. Dr. Frick said symptoms might also be nausea, or just generally feeling unwell.The bottom line:“If you have symptoms that don’t go away, or that are severe you should call 911.”To stay safe while shoveling snow, Dr. Frick suggests bundling up, using a smaller shovel, taking breaks, telling someone you’re going outside to shovel, and keeping your cell phone in your pocket incase you need to call someone.“Cold weather in and of itself can put an extra strain on the heart.” Google+ IndianaLocalMichiganNewsWeather Facebooklast_img read more

Read More →

News story: World’s largest genetics research project to fight deadly diseases and offer new offer for international students

first_img As one of the half million participants in UK BioBank, I’m very excited by the potential of the Whole Genome Sequencing Project, which will sequence the genetic code of everyone in UK BioBank to help develop novel and personalised forms of healthcare. UK BioBank is globally unique in the depth and quality of the information that it contains about so many people in health and disease. Adding whole genome sequencing data to this will provide major opportunities to improve how we prevent, diagnose and treat the chronic conditions that afflict so many of us as we live longer lives. Britain has a proud history of putting itself at the heart of international collaboration and discovery. Over sixty years ago, we saw the discovery of DNA in Cambridge by a team of international researchers and today we are going even further. Now we are bringing together experts from around the globe to work in the UK on the world’s largest genetics research project, set to help us better treat life-threatening illnesses and ultimately save lives. Breakthroughs of this kind wouldn’t be possible without being open to the brightest and the best from across the globe to study and work in the UK. That’s why we’re unveiling a new route for international students to unlock their potential and start their careers in the UK. Mene Pangalos, Executive Vice President, BioPharmaceuticals R&D, AstraZeneca, commented: Today’s funding will support one of the world’s most ambitious gene sequencing programmes ever undertaken, reflecting the UK’s determination to remain at the forefront of scientific endeavour and progress. Its results could transform the field of genetic repeated research – unlocking the causes of some of the most terrible diseases and how we can best tackle them. It will be a major step forward for individually tailored treatment plans, and will help us better understand why some people get certain diseases while others don’t. The new Graduate Route will mean talented international students, whether in science and maths or technology and engineering, can study in the UK and then gain valuable work experience as they go on to build successful careers. It demonstrates our global outlook and will ensure that we continue to attract the best and brightest. We are proud to participate in this ground-breaking initiative to generate genomics data from samples obtained through the generosity of citizens/people in the United Kingdom. The insights gained from the analysis of this rich data set will guide our efforts to develop safe and effective therapies so that diseases aren’t just being treated, they are predicted, pre-empted and stopped in their tracks to help generations of people live their healthiest lives. Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said: This historic whole genome sequencing effort is a welcome asset for researchers and testament to the volunteers who believe in the power of data to advance science. Genetically validated drug candidates are twice as likely to become registered novel medicines, and efforts like this bring us closer to developing transformational medicines that can significantly improve patient health and change lives. Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said: Prime Minister Boris Johnson has unveiled plans to transform how talented international students are able build successful careers in the UK through a new immigration route, as a new ground-breaking project in the fight against life-threatening illnesses launches.International students make up half of all full-time post-graduate students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) subjects. The new immigration route announced today (11 September 2019) will mean international graduates in any subject, including STEM, will be able to stay in the UK for two years to find work.Students will need to have successfully completed a degree from a trusted UK university or higher education provider which has a proven track record in upholding immigration checks and other rules on studying in the UK.This will build on government action to help recruit and retain the best and brightest global talent, but also open up opportunities for future breakthroughs in science, technology and research and other world-leading work that international talent brings to the UK.One example of pioneering research and international collaboration in the UK is the world’s largest genetics project, the £200 million whole genome sequencing project of all volunteers in the UK Biobank, launching today.The new project aims to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of serious and life-threatening illnesses including cancer, heart diseases, diabetes, arthritis and dementia, through genetic research that can explain why some people develop these conditions and others do not. The partnership of pharmaceutical firms and health experts from the UK and abroad will examine and sequence the genetic code of 500,000 volunteers at the UK Biobank.This sits alongside the work by Genomics England in partnership with NHS England on the 100,000 Genomes Project, which has seen around 25% of patients with rare diseases receive a diagnosis for the first time, and for some conditions a diagnosis rate as high as 60%.Prime Minister Boris Johnson said: John Lepore, Senior Vice President, Research at GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) said: This is very positive news. Evidence shows that international students bring significant positive social outcomes to the UK as well as £26 billion in economic contributions, but for too long the lack of post-study work opportunities in the UK has put us at a competitive disadvantage in attracting those students. The introduction of a two-year post-study work visa is something Universities UK has long campaigned for and we strongly welcome this policy change, which will put us back where we belong as a first choice study destination. Not only will a wide range of employers now have access to talented graduates from around the world, these students hold lifelong links in the UK. Richard Tillyer, PhD, Global Head, Janssen Discovery, Johnson & Johnson, commented:center_img This genome sequencing project will provide exciting new insights into the causes of many major diseases. It builds on 70 years of pioneering work in genetics research and exemplifies the creation of a whole new sector in Life Sciences that the UK Life Sciences Industrial Strategy has been developing. We do not know what the project will uncover but it is certain to be both novel and informative. I am incredibly excited by the potential of genomics to change the way we think about disease and healthcare. In an ageing society with an increasing burden of chronic diseases, it is vital that we diagnose earlier, personalise treatment and where possible prevent diseases from occurring altogether. This project will help unlock new treatments and grow our understanding of how genetics effects our risk of disease. It is one part of our world leading set of genomics programmes, including the NHS’ Genomics Medicine Service and the Accelerated Detection of Disease challenge, and shows that the UK is the go-to destination for genomics research and development. David M. Reese, M.D., Executive Vice-President of Research and Development at Amgen said: We are pleased to partner on a project with immense potential to advance public health. This collaboration reflects our belief in the power of human genetics to transform medicine and the need for continued growth in the size and diversity of the data that can be mined for new discoveries for patients with serious life-threatening diseases. Home Secretary Priti Patel said: It is a testament to our world-leading universities that so many students from abroad want to study here. The important contribution international students make to our country and universities is both cultural and economic. Their presence benefits Britain, which is why we’ve increased the period of time these students can remain in the UK after their studies. Our universities thrive on being open global institutions. Introducing the graduate route ensures our prestigious higher education sector will continue to attract the best talent from around the world to global Britain. Business Secretary Andrea Leadsom said: Alistair Jarvis, Chief Executive of Universities UK: Whole genome sequencing on this scale is unprecedented, and through this collaboration we hope to unlock the potential of genomics to evolve our understanding of complex diseases such as cancer, heart disease and chronic kidney disease. These new insights will guide our drug discovery programme and will help us bring innovative new precision medicines to patients who need them most urgently. Sir Mark Walport, Chief Executive of UK Research and Innovation said: Prof Sir John Bell, HMG’s Life Sciences Champion, said:last_img read more

Read More →

Warburtons’ Sylvester Stallone TV ad airs tomorrow

first_imgWarburtons has begun its countdown to the big unveil of its new advert starring Sylvester Stallone, which airs at 8pm on ITV tomorrow (11 April). The advert will air just before TV talent show, Britain’s Got Talent.The company has released a teaser video donning the hashtag #TheDeliverers, in which the Rocky star is pictured in a Warburtons branded uniform getting ready for ‘showtime’.The brand explained to one user on social media, that The Deliverers were their team of drivers who “deliver fresh bread daily”.The company has been quoted saying a ‘big investment’ has been made into the advert.Behind-the-scenes footage of the advert shoot shows the Hollywood star running up a flight of stairs to a building and jeering on a large group of people.The brand’s bread suffered a loss of more than £50m in sales last year [Nielsen 52 w/e 11 October 2014] as a result of the discounters and consumers moving away from traditional sliced bread.Stallone is well known for his Hollywood action roles, as boxer Rocky Balboa in the Rocky series, and John Rambo in Rambo. See the teaser, below.last_img read more

Read More →

Missing former SMC student found safe, in good health

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Courtney Souvannasacd Tiffany Keokanlaya, pictured, was reported missing by her family July 20. She was found safe Friday.Keokanlaya, a 19-year-old from South Elgin, Illinois, was reported missing July 20 by her family. She was last seen on video that same day in Chicago carrying a backpack and suitcase.“Good news!” the Village of South Elgin wrote in a Facebook post Friday. “Tiffany Keokanlaya has been found safe and in good health. South Elgin Police would like to thank the public for the tips and insights leading to this successful search.”The Facebook post did not state the reason why she went missing, but the South Elgin Police Department stated in its initial news release that no foul play was suspected. Even so, her leaving the family home without notice was unusual, the release said.Keokanlaya was in the process of transferring to Elgin Community College from Saint Mary’s, where she was a Belles Connect Scholar.Tags: missing student, South Elgin, Tiffany Keokanlaya Former Saint Mary’s student Tiffany Keokanlaya was found safe Friday after she went missing six days prior.last_img read more

Read More →

Senate discusses student union investment in forced labor, rejects proposal on petition for Jenkins’ resignation

first_imgThursday evening, the Notre Dame student senate gathered to discuss student union investments, coronavirus education, support for Title IV and the petition for Fr. John Jenkins resignation.Notre Dame Student Senate convened Thursday evening to discuss pressing issues impacting the student body and campus community. Including a discussion of the new Title IX policies and procedures.The meeting began with an update from Student Advisory Council on campus reopening. Major changes include indoor dining, which will begin in the dining halls Monday. More locations, such as Duncan Student Center and LaFortune Student Center, will likely open for indoor dining on Nov. 1.In addition, heating lamps will be installed in the North Quad and South Quad tents to accommodate for colder temperatures. In regard to residential life, students can now host two additional guests from their residence hall in their dorm as long as visitors wear a mask and keep doors open. Administration also hopes to open the residence halls to non-residents provided case numbers remain low.Surveillance testing will be unavailable this weekend as the testing center moves from its current location to the North Dome-Joyce Center. Currently, the committee is working with administration to consider testing options before students return home for winter break, as well as possible educational opportunities for students during the 10-week break. Looking forward to the spring semester, administration is brainstorming ideas to help avoid student burnout, which has been especially prominent this fall in the absence of a fall break.Next, an order to amend the constitution to prohibit student union investments in and consumption of forced labor was presented by senior Ricardo Pozas Garza with the senate voting to table the order and give the committee more time to finalize it. Since the Investment Office is a private entity, senators must cooperate with them to achieve these policy goals. The committee executives will meet with the Investment Office on Friday to present their request to gradually divest in companies profiting from unethical labor investments.Sophomore Isabella Garcia of Badin Hall was approved as the new appointment to the Campus Life Council before a resolution to educate COVID-19 positive students returning from isolation on the continued risks and unknowns about the coronavirus. Specifically, the resolution calls for administration to provide consistent information about how the level of antibodies and immunity can vary by individual and how research on reinfection remains ongoing.Senior off-campus president Connor Delaney, joined by senior director of university policy Abby Wolfe, spoke next advocating in support of a resolution to uphold the preponderance of evidence standard in Title IX and other sex-based misconduct cases. The University currently has two different evidence standards on record, but new national guidelines from the Department of Education require that only one standard remain in place.The preponderance standard requires that a claim presented for review must be more likely true than not with a greater than 50% likelihood while the clear and convincing standard holds that a claim presented for review must be highly and substantially more likely to be true. Citing already low rates of reporting among Notre Dame students, members of the committee endorsed the preponderance standard as the best option. Given the limited use of the clear and convincing standard, zero cases in the last five years, and the worry that more stringent standards may lead to a decrease in reporting, the committee strongly favored the preponderance standard.“It’s the only standard that treats complainant and defendant equally,” Delaney said.The senate seconded the committee’s position, voting to approve the resolution in favor of the preponderance standard.To wrap up the evening, the senate opened the petition for Father Jenkins’ resignation for discussion. Since the petition garnered 213 signatures, the judiciary council was obligated to formally sponsor a proposal for Jenkins’s resignation.Juniors Ashton Weber, Makira Walton and Patrick Kelly-Dutile, the authors of the petition, made the case for Jenkins’ resignation, pointing to his violation of coronavirus guidelines in attendance at the nomination ceremony for Justice Amy Coney Barrett on September 26. The petition-writers said Jenkins’ hypocrisy, poor leadership and uninspiring apology were grounds for passing this proposal.“He cast a negative light on the University as a whole,” Kelly-Dutile said.Supporters also noted how the Dean of the Law School chose to follow guidelines, further proving Jenkins’s conscious choice to break protocols. They noted some students who broke COVID-19 guidelines were dismissed from the University while the president broke guidelines with no consequences.Many senators spoke up against the proposal on the grounds that only 2.5% of the student population signed the petition. Additionally, they emphasized how the proposal was very extreme and would only be a recommendation on behalf of the student body with no binding power. A few senators supported less extreme measures to make student voices heard, such as an official statement of senatorial disapproval of Jenkins’ actions.“Passing this resolution will only hurt you in the eyes of the administration,” junior Thomas Davis, the parliamentarian, said. “The precedent you’re setting by passing this may shut [the senate] off from any further dialogue going forward.”On the other side of the debate, the proposal’s supporters argued that extreme measures are needed to call proper attention to the situation.“Something this actionable has never been done before,” the petition writers said. “That is going to open up more dialogue and discourse than a petition advocating for dialogue and discourse.”With these considerations in mind, the majority voted against the resolution with further discussion on formerly condemning the president’s actions and opening up dialogue on the situation slated for next week’s meeting.Tags: Campus DIning, COVID-19, Father Jenkins, indoor dining, resignation, Senate, Title IXlast_img read more

Read More →

Enel begins construction of third wind farm this year in South Africa

first_imgEnel begins construction of third wind farm this year in South Africa FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renewables Now:Italy’s Enel SpA, through its renewables arm Enel Green Power RSA, has launched construction of the 140-MW Garob wind farm in the Northern Cape province in South Africa.Enel said Tuesday it would invest over EUR 200 million (USD 226m) in what will be the company’s third wind power project in the country since the beginning of 2019. EGP is already building Nxuba and Oyster Bay wind farms, both of 140 MW, in South Africa’s Eastern Cape province.The Garob wind farm, with its 46 wind turbines capable of producing around 573 GWh each year, is expected to start generating power by the first half of 2021.The new farm is one of five wind projects totaling 700 MW that EGP won in the fourth bidding round of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme (REIPPPP). Besides Nxuba, Oyster Bay and Garob, Enel’s other awarded schemes include the 140-MW Karusa and the 140-MW Soetwater wind farm projects, both located in the Northern Cape.EGP currently operates more than 520 MW of wind and solar capacity in South Africa. In the wind power department, the company has the 88-MW Nojoli and the 111-MW Gibson Bay wind farms in operation in the Eastern Cape.More: Enel starts building 3rd wind farm of 140 MW in S Africalast_img read more

Read More →