Thomas Waldrom named Aviva Premiership Player of the Month

first_img Thomas Waldrom has been voted the Aviva Premiership Rugby Player of the Month.The Leicester Tigers number 8 was picked for December by a panel made up of rugby media representatives from print, TV, radio and the photographers.Rugby World editor Paul Morgan, who chairs the panel, commented: “Since arriving from New Zealand, Thomas has really lived up to his nickname of ‘The Tank’ marauding around the Aviva Premiership Rugby and contributing to his team’s recent impressive performances. He is world-class in the tight but what sets him apart is his love of the open spaces, where he is a sensational runner, and up there with the most consistent players in Europe. A very well deserved winner.”The powerful, ball carrying New Zealander renowned for his gutsy displays, has found real success at the base of the scrum playing a pivotal role in the Leicester pack and helping his team climb to the top of the Aviva Premiership Rugby table.Thomas spoke of the pride he felt for being named December’s Player of the Month: “It is very special to win the award,” “It was unexpected but I will definitely take it. Heather Smith, Head of Sponsorship for Premiership Rugby sponsors Aviva added: “Thomas’ work ethic and attitude is symptomatic of Leicester Tigers approach to the game. He has been a consistent performer and who strives to give 100% in every match.” TAGS: Leicester Tigers LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “I feel like I have been playing some good rugby in a team that has been playing some good football and it is nice to get recognised.“It has been going really well for the team, we have worked hard and when we have had an injury people have stepped up but we know there is a long way to go.”Leicester Tigers director of rugby Richard Cockerill said: “We knew we were signing a very good player when we brought Thomas in during the summer and I’m delighted that he’s settled so well. He has been playing well, he gives us a good balance in the back row, he is enjoying his rugby and his family like it here.”last_img read more

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For many LGBTQ Episcopalians, the struggle for full inclusion is…

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT For many LGBTQ Episcopalians, the struggle for full inclusion is not over – it’s expanded Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID LGBTQ Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Charlie Knuth of All Saints Episcopal Church swings a censer as he marches in an LGBTQ pride parade in Salt Lake City, Utah, on June 2, 2013. Photo: Jim Urquhart/Reuters[Episcopal News Service] For years, the LGBTQ movement in The Episcopal Church had a specific primary goal in mind: full participation in the sacraments, including matrimony and holy orders. After decades of activism by advocates like Louie Crew Clay and groups like Integrity, those goals were achieved – at least on paper – by 2018, when General Convention approved a resolution granting full churchwide access to same-sex marriage rites.Three years later, the question of whether the campaign for LGBTQ acceptance in the church is complete is a topic of increasing discussion. For many LGBTQ Episcopalians, the answer is no, but the path forward is less focused on one legislative outcome and more on cultural shifts. The spectrum of gender and sexuality in America is increasingly diverse and visible, with more Americans than ever identifying as LGBT. However, Pride celebrations this month are coinciding with a record number of anti-transgender bills in state legislatures, largely centered around young transgender athletes and access to medical care.While The Episcopal Church has been among the most progressive denominations in regard to LGBTQ acceptance, some say it hasn’t evolved enough. Criticism of Washington National Cathedral’s decision to invite the Rev. Max Lucado, who previously expressed anti-gay views, has revealed a rift in the church, with some saying the move was a slap in the face to LGBTQ Episcopalians. And when the Rt. Rev. Gene Robinson, the first openly LGBTQ bishop in the Anglican Communion, tried to assuage those concerns by saying “we’ve won” the battle for LGBTQ inclusion, for some, it has never felt that way – especially those who are not white and cisgender.“That was a really striking moment to me as a Latino gay man,” said Miguel Escobar, executive director of the Episcopal Divinity School at Union Theological Seminary, during a House of Deputies discussion on May 18 titled “A Full and Equal Claim: LGBTQ+ Episcopalians Discuss the Path Forward.”“I heard that and thought, ‘Wow, that’s not my experience as a person of color [in] this church, or member of society as an LGBTQ person.’”Others on the panel agreed that the National Cathedral incident highlighted a disconnect in the church but also presented a learning opportunity, including the Rev. Cameron Partridge, rector of St. Aidan’s Episcopal Church in San Francisco, California, and a transgender man.“I completely respect Bishop Gene and everything that he’s done,” Partridge told Episcopal News Service. “I think that the work is unfinished. And I think my sense is that the cathedral has heard loud and clear that there’s more work to be done.”The Rev. Cameron Partridge. Photo courtesy of the Diocese of CaliforniaHowever, the goals now are more diverse and less tangible than they were in the 1990s and 2000s, when Integrity advocated for procedural gains at General Convention. With Integrity now essentially defunct, there is a less unified agenda, but two areas of concern have emerged from those who have been vocal on the issue. In public discussions and interviews with ENS, some LGBTQ Episcopalians have said the official stance of acceptance is not practiced on the ground in some areas of the church, especially when it comes to transgender and nonbinary people and LGBTQ people of color.“People’s experiences are pretty uneven,” Partridge said. “People across the church should feel fully embraced and their leadership honored, and I think that is happening in a variety of places, but it’s not happening everywhere. And there’s a need to really embrace the gains that we’ve made legislatively within the church and to really embody them more fully.”Partridge and others say many parishes, even ones that profess to be LGBTQ-inclusive, don’t have the experience or resources to fully welcome transgender and nonbinary people, let alone hire them or include them in leadership positions.“Probably the biggest area for us to grow is … supporting trans and nonbinary folk in the church,” said the Rev. Charles Graves IV, the Diocese of Texas’ campus missioner in Houston. Graves told ENS he doesn’t feel comfortable referring LGBTQ students, especially those who are transgender and nonbinary, to some parishes because they might not have accepting and inclusive environments. Some of that is cultural, he said, but it also comes down to more practical issues.The Rev. Charles Graves IV. Photo courtesy of the Diocese of Texas“Most churches don’t have a bathroom that a nonbinary person can go to and not feel weird about,” he said. “In a lot of places … if you’re somebody who uses they/them pronouns, you’re going to end up explaining that to people 500 times.”Some LGBTQ Episcopalians of color have said that they experience additional barriers to acceptance. In a church that continues to struggle with racism within its structures and membership, their race magnifies the exclusion they already feel as LGBTQ people.“There were some churches I applied to that I couldn’t get as a gay person, and there were others that I applied to that I couldn’t get as a Black person,” Graves told ENS, describing his earlier job searches. “The same is true for female clergy and even more so for nonbinary clergy. The more of those categories they check off, the harder it’s going to be.”The constitutions and canons of some dioceses still officially ban gay clergy – unless celibate – and same-sex marriages, including Albany, Dallas and Central Florida. In the ordination application forms for Central Florida and Dallas, ordinands are asked to affirm that they will abide by the diocesan canons that define marriage as one man and one woman and stipulate that clergy must remain celibate outside of marriage.According to The Episcopal Church’s canon law, churches in such dioceses that wish to perform same-sex marriages may seek pastoral oversight from another bishop, although even that was still prohibited in the Diocese of Albany as recently as January 2021. And some parishes explicitly state that they only marry heterosexual couples, including The Episcopal Church’s largest parish, St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Houston.“In some parts of the church, it may seem like full inclusion is no longer really an issue, like we’ve been there, done that, and we’re kind of on to the next thing,” said the Rev. Devon Anderson, rector of Trinity Church in Excelsior, Minnesota, and a member of Executive Council, “but I just think in so many other places, people … feel vulnerable because either local leaders aren’t supportive or because civil protections seem to be at risk.”Anderson put forth a resolution that Executive Council passed at its April meeting, which expresses lament for the harm the church has done to LGBTQ people and pledges to do better. The resolution doesn’t mention the Max Lucado incident specifically, but Anderson said she was prompted to write the resolution by the reaction to that, as well as the Vatican’s statement in March that the Roman Catholic Church will not bless same-sex unions, calling them sinful.“I had parishioners that were like, ‘How do I interpret all of this stuff that’s going on? Where’s the church in this? Am I still safe here? Is this someplace that’s going to use my gifts and deployment fully in ministry and offer me all the sacraments?’” she told ENS.The resolution “confesses the Church’s continued heterosexism, homophobia, biphobia and transphobia, and the ongoing harmful impact of anti-LGBTQ+ Christian proclamation, preaching, pastoral care, and theology” and expresses a renewed commitment to ensuring that LGBTQ people experience a “full and equal claim” to church life.Anderson, who consulted with Partridge and other LGBTQ Episcopalians in crafting the resolution’s language, said she thought the church needed to acknowledge the rejection and pain some are still experiencing and reassure them that the church’s leaders are still working to ensure they are welcomed everywhere.The resolution itself does not solve the existing problems, she said, but it provides a basis for more specific actions to that end.“You can’t mobilize anybody around a platitude, and in some ways, you could look at this resolution and think, ‘Wow, that’s another platitude,’” but it goes deeper than that, she told ENS.“[It says,] we’ve committed ourselves resolutely to this vision, and the church is going to make serious mistakes and that doesn’t mean that the vision isn’t still intact or any less sacred,” she said.A range of more specific solutions have been proposed, including ideas for General Convention resolutions that came up during the May 18 House of Deputies webinar. One potential resolution to address discrimination in hiring clergy might involve “finding ways to make the search and call process truly open and inclusive,” said House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings during the webinar. Other ideas included a sexuality and gender audit, similar to the racial justice audit the church just performed.Partridge and Graves told ENS that one of the major challenges ahead is translating resolutions and statements into visible actions on the diocesan and congregational levels. Partridge praised the efforts of the TransEpiscopal advocacy group, which has been active since 2005 and is currently working on compiling a list of readings and resources to help educate Episcopalians on transgender issues. He hopes that parishes will host workshops and reading series that will help them not only welcome the transgender and nonbinary people who may visit, but also embrace and honor those who are already in their congregations or have family members who are.“It’s not like a not-yet thing; it’s a reality,” Partridge told ENS, “and people need to feel fully embraced and supported, and to really truly feel that The Episcopal Church has their back.”– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA By Egan MillardPosted Jun 8, 2021 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

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Racist cops protested

first_imgGabrielle Melton at Nov. 20protest.WW photo: Kris HamelVile racism is on the rise in metropolitan Detroit. First, there was the seemingly cold- blooded shooting death of young motorist Renisha McBride in the westside suburb of Dearborn Heights, Mich. Now, it’s reared its ugly head on the eastside in the Grosse Pointes, a series of small wealthy suburbs adjacent to Detroit. In both situations, widespread anger has ensued and protests for justice have been sparked.At noon on Nov. 20, protesters gathered outside the Police Department at the municipal complex of Grosse Pointe Park, Mich., to demand an end to racism and racial profiling by the GPP police. Videos have come to light depicting racist cops harassing, humiliating and degrading a cognitively challenged African-American man by ordering him to sing “like a chimp” and other outrages.Gabrielle Melton, 24, was coming out of the GPP library and came over to join the protest. She told Workers World: “On Saturday night [Nov. 16] I had seven Grosse Pointe squad cars at my house. Somehow they got inside. They made me take a breathalyzer test in my own home!” Melton is a cashier at a grocery store in Grosse Pointe. She described the racism she experiences in these eastside suburbs as “never ending.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Tell Biden and Bill Gates: End vaccine apartheid!

first_imgSeattleNearly 100 demonstrators rallied here April 30 in front of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — the world’s richest “philanthropic” foundation — to demand “End vaccine apartheid!”Protests to free vaccines from being corporate ‘intellectual property’ are spreading, here at Moderna headquarters in Cambridge, Mass., April 28.Gates, co-founder of the Microsoft corporation, is one of the multibillionaires opposed to allowing intellectual property (IP) waivers so all countries could produce vaccines. Gates is allied with Big Pharma in a big way. He made his fortune relying on IP protections on Microsoft products.The solidarity protest came after a resolution passed by the Seattle CityCouncil, which joined 400 plus organizations around the world in urging President Joe Biden to immediately waive intellectual property restrictions on U.S.-owned vaccines. This would assist all countries in the production of less-expensive generic COVID-19 vaccines — and would save human lives.The Seattle action was led by Councilperson Kshama Sawant and the Seattle Coalition of Indian Americans (SCIA). Sawant said Biden’s recent lifting of the ban on exporting vaccine materials to India dealt with only a tiny part of the problem.Hassan Khan of the SCIA pointed out the terrible mounting deaths causedby the refusal of Big Pharma in the West to share the vaccine with India. He said, “What is happening to India will come back to the West.” This is a reference to the fact that continuing pandemic infections anywhere on earth open the way to multiple virus variants that current vaccines may not be able to resist.While more than 240 million doses against COVID have been administered in the U.S., billions of people around the world do not have access to lifesaving vaccines.The World Health Organization reported April 9 that over 87% of the vaccines have gone to high-income or upper- and middle-income countries, while low-income countries have just received 0.2%. (tinyurl.com/3syb2pxh) WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus emphasized: “On average in high-income countries, almost one in four people has received a vaccine. In low-income countries, it’s one in more than 500. Let me repeat that: one in four versus one in 500.”As protestors at the rally chanted, “Whose vaccine? People’s vaccine!” Hillary Hayden of the Washington Free Trade Coalition said that “113 countries have yet to receive a single dose of the vaccine” due to Big Pharma’s genocidal priorities. Hayden noted that waivers of intellectual property resolutions have been passed by hundreds of organizations, such as Doctors Without Borders, and emphasized more of this needs to happen. She said people were demonstrating for the vaccine waiver in Atlanta at a recent speech by Biden.Preston, a member of the 6,000-strong United Auto Workers Local 4121 at the University of Washington, spoke on how he and his co-workers — who were teachers, health care workers and researchers — had helped create COVID vaccines. He stressed the vaccines had been funded by the public, but big pharmaceutical companies were now making obscene profits off those public funds while denying vaccines to people from the Global South.Both Preston and Sawant demanded free health care for all. The action was also supported by the Community Alliance for Global Justice/AGRA Watch and Socialist Alternative.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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€150 000 payout to Universit of Limerick whistleblowers

first_imgFacebook Email WhatsApp Advertisement Twitter THREE whistleblowers who alerted authorities about misleading statements concerning severance payments of more than €1.2 million have been paid €150,000 by their former employers at the University of Limerick.An internal audit showed that there were unauthorised payments, breaches in procurement and inappropriate spending at the university.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Leona O’Callaghan, the only one of the three to waive anonymity, was paid €60,000, having initially refused an offer of €150,000 and a pension.“Despite how blowing the whistle ruined my life, I wouldn’t change a thing,” she said in a recent interview.The other two staff involved also received payments and had their suspensions lifted but it is not known of they have returned to UL.center_img News€150 000 payout to Universit of Limerick whistleblowersBy Cian Reinhardt – June 21, 2018 3277 Linkedin Previous articleGallery Interlude opens at Lucky LaneNext articleLimerick GAA Notes Cian Reinhardthttp://www.limerickpost.ieJournalist & Digital Media Coordinator. Covering human interest and social issues as well as creating digital content to accompany news stories. [email protected] Printlast_img read more

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Bombay High Court Issues Notice On Perarivalan’s Plea For Information On Early Release Of Sanjay Dutt

first_imgNews UpdatesBombay High Court Issues Notice On Perarivalan’s Plea For Information On Early Release Of Sanjay Dutt Sharmeen Hakim19 Feb 2021 8:15 AMShare This – xThe Bombay High Court, on Wednesday, issued notice to the State Information Commission on a petition filed by a convict in former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi assassination case, seeking details related to the early release of actor Sanjay Dutt, who was convicted in the 1993 Bombay serial bomb blasts case. The petitioner, A G Perarivalan (48), who is serving his 30th year of life…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Bombay High Court, on Wednesday, issued notice to the State Information Commission on a petition filed by a convict in former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi assassination case, seeking details related to the early release of actor Sanjay Dutt, who was convicted in the 1993 Bombay serial bomb blasts case. The petitioner, A G Perarivalan (48), who is serving his 30th year of life in prison, intends to cite Dutt’s case for an early release on similar grounds. Perarivalan was sentenced to death, in 1998, for having provided two 9-volt batteries, which were used in the bomb that killed former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi. He was 19-years-old at the time of his arrest. The Supreme Court commuted his sentence to life imprisonment, in 2014, citing an inordinate delay of 11 years in deciding his mercy plea. He approached the Bombay High Court last year, after all his attempts to procure document’s related to Dutt’s release under the Right to Information Act failed. A division bench of Justices KK Tated and RI Chagla heard Perarivalan, through his counsel Nilesh Ukey, on Wednesday following which the court issued notice to the State Information Commission. The other respondents, including the State, were represented by a Government Pleader. Ukey informed the bench that his client was in “grave need” of the documents pertaining to Dutt’s release, to help him in his case, however, Maharashtra’s prison department was not ready to part with the relevant information. Ukey submitted that despite Dutt’s conviction under the Arms Act, a central act, the State of Maharashtra granted him 256 days’ remission, adding, that the Union of India recently filed an affidavit in the Supreme Court and has taken a stand that it is only the President of India who has the power to remit Perarivalan’s sentence, and not the Tamil Nadu Governor. The HC bench also allowed Perarivalan to amend his petition based on the Union’s affidavit before the SC. Perarivalan approached the apex court in 2016 seeking to expedite a decision on remission of his sentence. The Tamil Nadu state government’s recommendation was pending before the Governor for over 2 years by then. He sought Dutt’s documents around the same time. Dutt was sentenced to six years imprisonment, in 2006-07, by a special court constituted under the Terrorist and Disruptive Activities (Prevention) Act. His imprisonment was reduced to five years by the apex court in 2013. The actor was released on furlough and parole a few times while serving his term at Yerwada prison, Pune. He was finally released from the prison on February 25, 2016, after being granted 256 days’ remission. Perarivalan is seeking to know if the Union’s or state government’s opinion was taken before granting remission to Dutt. The quest for Dutt’s documents As per Perarivalan’s petition, he filed an application under the Right to Information Act with Yerwada prison in March 2016, seeking information pertaining to Dutt’s early release. When he did not receive a reply from the Yerwada prison, he approached the Appellate Authority, which too refused to provide the information, saying it relates to a third person. He then filed an appeal before the State Information Commission, which passed an “insufficient and vague” order. Following which, he approached the High court. “The State Information Commission ought to have directed Yerwada prison authorities to provide relevant, complete and sufficient information to the petitioner (Perarivalan) and ought to have appreciated the fact that obtaining information relating to the release of Sanjay Dutt would help in remission of the petitioner who has spent 29 years in jail,” the petition reads. The petition seeks directions from the HC for Yerwada prison authorities to provide him the relevant information and set aside the Appellate authority’s order. “The petitioner is not concerned about the extraordinariness of the considerations, if any, in the case of Sanjay Dutt by the jail department at each stage of release/remission/parole and furlough. The petitioner is also not interested in sending Dutt behind bars for the remission granted to him, if it is found to be granted in contrary to law,” the petition says. It adds that the petitioner is only concerned with the documents and information related to the calculation of remission, furlough and parole so that he could use the said information to seek early release.Next Storylast_img read more

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Supreme Court To Hear Plea Challenging Extension Of ED Director’s Term On April 16

first_imgTop StoriesSupreme Court To Hear Plea Challenging Extension Of ED Director’s Term On April 16 LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK5 April 2021 1:36 AMShare This – xThe Supreme Court will hear on April 16 the petition filed by Common Cause which challenges the extension given to the term of the Director of Enforcement Directorate Sanjay Kumar Mishra with retrospective effect.On Monday, a bench comprising Justices L Nageswara Rao and Vineet Saran posted the matter for disposal on next Friday. Attorney General KK Venugopal told the bench that the reply to…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court will hear on April 16 the petition filed by Common Cause which challenges the extension given to the term of the Director of Enforcement Directorate Sanjay Kumar Mishra with retrospective effect.On Monday, a bench comprising Justices L Nageswara Rao and Vineet Saran posted the matter for disposal on next Friday. Attorney General KK Venugopal told the bench that the reply to the petition is ready and is being filed today.The petition challenges the order issued by the President on November 13 last year, which modified the 2018 appointment order of ED Director to increase his original term of appointment as 3 years instead of 2 years. ED Director SK Mishra’s term was otherwise for a period of two years till November 18, 2020.The petition has stated that according to provisions of the CVC Act, a Committee recommends the candidate to be appointed as the ED Director, to the Ministry of Finance. Such Director cannot be below the rank of Additional Secretary to the Central Government and he shall continue to hold office for a period of not less than two years.The NGO has contended that after the end of Mishra’s two-year tenure as the ED Director, he would have been ineligible for appointment to the said post again by virtue of Section 25 of the CVC Act.It has been further contended that there is neither any enabling provision in the CVC Act for extension of service of the Director, Enforcement Directorate nor any enabling provision which provides for such retrospective modification of appointment orders. “The impugned Office Order, dated 13.11.2020, issued by the Respondent No.1 is in the teeth of Section 25 of the CVC Act as the said Section provides that a person has to be above the rank of Additional Secretary to the Government of India to be eligible for appointment as a Director of Enforcement. Thus, as the Respondent No.2 has already reached his retirement age in May 2020, therefore, after the end of Respondent No.2’s two-year period on 19.11.2020, the Respondent No.2, by virtue of not holding any post above the rank of Additional Secretary, would have been ineligible for appointment as a Director of Enforcement again,” the plea states. It is contended that the Government has employed a circuitous route in order to ensure that Mishra gets one more year as the ED Director and it is submitted, The plea has submitted that the intention behind Section 25 (d) in providing a minimum tenure of two years to the ED only to insulate the Director of Enforcement from all kinds of influences and pressures. However, the said purpose gets defeated if on the verge of his two-year tenure and much after his retirement age, the Director of Enforcement is given a de facto extension in service by adoption of a circuitous route of modifying the initial appointment order itself. TagsSupreme Court Common Cause Notice Issued Appointment Enforcement Directorate DirectorDuring the admission hearing on February 25, , Advocate Prashant Bhushan, appearing for the petitioner, submitted that according to the scheme of the act he shall have minimum tenure of 2 years. However, he was given a one year extension. “This is destroying independence of ED, it has become means for harassment. ” Bhushan had submitted.”Mr. Bhushan we are impressed with the point you are making. We will hear you.” the Bench had observed while issuing notice.   Next Storylast_img read more

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Homemade cigar humidor ‘resembling pipe bomb’ confiscated at major airport

first_imgTransportation Security AdministrationBy JON HAWORTH, ABC News (NEW YORK) — Transportation Security Administration officials were relieved to discover that a homemade container made out of a PVC pipe was not actually a pipe bomb trying to be smuggled through the airport — but a homemade humidor for a cigar.The incident occurred on Sunday, Nov. 8, when a man was stopped at LaGuardia Airport after TSA officials spotted a suspicious device while screening his carry-on luggage.“The carry-on bag contained two torch-style lighters along with a homemade container made out of nine-inch long PVC pipe and end caps, which resembled a pipe bomb,” the TSA said in a statement. “However, when an end cap was removed, a partially smoked cigar was discovered inside.”Concerned airport officials warned him that the item could too easily be mistaken by flight crew and passengers as a pipe bomb and that he could not carry it onto the plane. The homemade device, along with the torch-style lighters, were surrendered to authorities along with the home made device containing the half-smoked cigar.As the holiday season approaches and, along with it, some of the busiest travel days of the year, authorities are on high alert — even if this year travel isn’t expected to be as busy as previous years due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.“Our TSA officers are vigilant about looking for explosive devices, and this certainly gave the impression that it could be a pipe bomb that someone was attempting to carry onto an aircraft,” said Robert Duffy, TSA’s Federal Security director for LaGuardia Airport. “Fortunately it turned out not to be an explosive device, but had he pulled it out during his flight, it could have caused a panic. Replica weapons are not permitted on aircraft and this easily could have passed for an improvised explosive device. It was a good catch on the part of the officers who were staffing the checkpoint.”The traveler, a resident of Hopewell Junction, New York, in Dutchess County, was reprimanded but allowed to continue on his way following the incident.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Structural variations in derivatives of the bacteriochlorophylls of Chlorobiaceae: impact of stratigraphic resolution on depth profiles as revealed by methanolysis

first_imgBacteriochlorophylls c and d, recovered from two sedimentary sequences, were converted to bacteriophaeophorbide methyl esters by methanolysis and analysed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation liquid chromatography-multi-stage mass spectrometry (APCI LC-MSn). The distributions in both settings, a moderately consolidated sediment from Kirisjes Pond, Antarctica, and in a finely laminated microbial mat from Les Salines de la Trinitat, Spain, show significant variations within a narrow depth interval. The overall bacteriophaeophorbide c to d ratios in the two sediments are different, as are the ratios of particular C-3(1) diastereoisomers, indicating distinct differences between the bacterial communities that contributed to each sediment. Furthermore, a shift towards more extensive alkylation in homologues within each sediment is consistent either with changing environmental conditions in the depositional environments, or development-related changes in the structure of the bacterial community, leading to increased competition for light or nutrients.last_img read more

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Former Manti High Student-Athlete Earns RMAC Academic Honors For Dixie State Track

first_imgTo be eligible for consideration, a student-athlete must carry a 3.30 GPA and been an active student at the institution they compete for at least two consecutive semesters or three consecutive quarters. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailST. GEORGE, Utah-Friday, six Dixie State track and field student- athletes earned academic honors from the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference, including a former Manti High School student-athlete. Rebecca Anderson (formerly Opoulos) was among the Trailblazers to achieve this award. The Sterling native starred as a hurdler and sprinter for Dixie State. Written by May 10, 2019 /Sports News – Local Former Manti High Student-Athlete Earns RMAC Academic Honors For Dixie State Track Anderson achieved a 3.94 GPA in communication studies to represent Dixie State University well with this award. Brad Jameslast_img read more

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