Mercury Packaging acquisition

first_imgFood packaging company Certiforms has been acquired by packaging manufacturer, Mercury Packaging.The deal is part of Mercury Packaging’s expansion plans, enabling the company to offer enhanced printing capabilities, production efficiencies and technical expertise to a number of industries and allow it to increase its focus on the baking industry as well as other sector in the food industry.Certiforms, currently located in Macclesfield, produce wicketted bags that are available in a range of sizes, thicknesses and substrates including low and high density polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), co-extruded films, and polyester. They are available plain or printed in up to eight colours and are manufactured in a variety of different styles.Tony Stanger, Mercury Packaging’s managing director said the acquisition “allows us to quickly penetrate the previously untapped food industry”.Mercury Packaging, based in Nottinghamshire, specialises in the supply of high clarity polypropylene films for display purposes and has recently added a range of laminates to supplement its single ply films for the food packaging sector.last_img read more

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New hope against diabetes

first_imgA diabetes treatment based on one that cured mice in laboratory experiments has produced promising results in humans enrolled in an initial drug trial, killing immune system cells that attack diabetics’ pancreases and raising levels of a chemical marker that indicates that the pancreas is producing insulin, according to the trial’s lead researcher.The results are encouraging enough that Associate Professor of Medicine Denise Faustman, a physician at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), is planning the next round of testing for the drug, a decades-old tuberculosis vaccine called Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Faustman cautioned that there remains a long way to go before the treatment is proven helpful against human diabetes.“It’s promising, but it’s not replacing insulin yet,” said Faustman, director of MGH’s Immunobiology Laboratory.Faustman announced the results of the phase 1 human trial on Friday (June 24). The phase 1 trial is the first in a multistep process required by federal regulators before drugs are approved for use against specific diseases. Though a phase 1 trial is typically focused on a drug’s safety, with effectiveness tested in phase 2, Faustman said their tests showed that the human subjects not only tolerated the drug, but had a positive response to it, similar to that seen in laboratory mice, albeit to a lesser degree.The approach targets type 1 diabetes, which occurs when the body’s own immune system attacks insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin is a critical hormone that helps the body take up and metabolize sugars. Without a properly functioning pancreas to produce insulin, blood sugar skyrockets, potentially causing coma and death. Type 1 diabetics today use insulin injections to control their blood sugar. Though effective, the injections — typically given daily — cannot replicate the body’s subtle control of blood sugar. Lack of blood sugar control can lead to nerve damage, blindness, kidney failure, and other complications.Faustman and her research team stunned the diabetes world and generated a storm of controversy 10 years ago when she announced that she’d cured diabetes in laboratory mice with advanced disease. The researchers injected the mice with a compound called complete Freund’s adjuvant, which stimulated their bodies to produce tumor necrosis factor, a molecule that selectively destroys the rogue immune cells while leaving the body’s other protective cells alone.The Faustman mouse experiments used a second intervention to re-educate the precursor cells that give rise to the rogue immune cells. It is those precursor cells, which were somehow miseducated to recognize the body’s beta cells as foreign, that pass on the faulty instructions to attack the pancreas.At that point, researchers had halted the immune system’s attack against the body’s own beta cells, but believed they had to transplant beta cells to the depleted pancreas to restore insulin production.To Faustman’s surprise, the mice started producing insulin on their own, indicating that their pancreases, even after having been shut down for a significant time, were able to regenerate the key cells needed to resume insulin production.The phase 1 human trials differ from the mouse experiments in an important way. Researchers working with the mice employed a two-pronged strategy, using one drug to knock out the bad immune system cells, called T-cells, and a second intervention to destroy the precursor cells that gave rise to them. Because drug trials can only test one compound at a time, Faustman said the human trials are testing only a drug that researchers believe knocks out the bad T-cells but not their precursors. This means that should the treatment ultimately prove effective, repeated doses will be needed to forestall a renewed attack on the pancreas.The phase 1 trial used an FDA-approved drug similar to the one used in the mouse experiments, which was for research purposes only. In the human trials, they used the tuberculosis vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guerin instead of complete Freund’s adjuvant to stimulate the body to produce tumor necrosis factor.In the double-blind human trial, researchers administered low doses of BCG or a placebo to a dozen diabetics who had the disease for an average of 15 years. The drug was given in two doses, four weeks apart, and blood was drawn weekly or biweekly for 20 weeks. Results were compared against 90 additional reference samples. All together, researchers examined more than 1,000 samples.Faustman said the trial showed that BCG treatment killed the pancreas-attacking T-cells and boosted the body’s protective T-cells. Because the trial participants were diabetic and taking insulin at the time to control their condition, researchers couldn’t directly measure insulin levels to see whether the beta cells had resumed functioning. Instead, they measured levels of a marker compound, called C-peptide, which is produced by the pancreas when it also produces insulin. They saw a temporary increase in C-peptide levels in a majority of participants, indicating that their pancreases had begun at least some insulin production, Faustman said.While the results are promising, Faustman said they do require follow-up. Researchers are preparing a phase 2 trial employing more study subjects to test dosage and effectiveness. Though the study is still being designed, Faustman said researchers would likely administer a higher dose of BCG to diabetic participants every six weeks for 18 months. Because participants would enter the study at different times, she expects the entire trial to take three years.last_img read more

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Run the Yard! 5k University-wide fun run

first_imgGrab your sneakers and register to join the Harvard Community for a University-wide fun run on Friday, March 24.  This free, untimed 5K will do three loops around historic Harvard Yard and the northern Law School campus.  Harvard students, faculty, and staff, along with their friends and families are welcome to participate. Registration, refreshments, and activities will be held on the Plaza.7:25 am – Check-in opens on the Plaza, adjacent to the Science Center.7:45 am – Harvard Recreation leads warm-up exercises8:00 am – Fun run begins!8:30-9:30 am – Harvard Recreation leads cool-down exercises on the Plaza along with light refreshmentsSponsored by: Common Spaces, Harvard Recreation, The Office for Student Life, Harvard Center for Wellness, and the Office for Sustainability.last_img read more

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Rob McClure to Star in Irma La Douce at Encores!

first_img Star Files After a three-year run in Paris, an English-language version of Irma La Douce, directed by Peter Brook, appeared in London and then on Broadway, where it opened at the Plymouth Theatre on September 29, 1960 and ran for 524 performances. The score produced one standard, “Our Language of Love,” and also features “The Valse Millieu” and “Dis Donc.” View Comments Jennifer Bowles (Matilda) will play the title role opposite Tony nominee Rob McClure (Chaplin) in a New York City Center Encores! production of Irma La Douce. With music by Marguerite Monnot and English book and lyrics by Julian More, David Heneker and Monty Norman, the show is adapted from original book and lyrics by Alexandre Breffort. The final production of the 2014 Encores! season, Irma La Douce will run for seven performances, May 7 through May 11.center_img Irma La Douce will be the first musical at Encores! not written on American soil. The show tells the tale of a Parisian lady of the evening (Bowles) and the law student (McClure) who falls in love with her. Directed by John Doyle and choreographed by Chase Brock, Irma La Douce will also feature Sam Bolen, Allan Corduner, Ben Crawford, Stephen DeRosa, Ken Krugman, Zachary James and Chris Sullivan with Kurt Froman, Joseph Medeiros, Joseph Simeone and Manuel Stark. Rob McClurelast_img read more

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U.S. and Guatemala Seize 598 kilos of Cocaine

first_imgBy Dialogo September 20, 2012 The U.S. and Guatemalan Coast Guards seized 598 kilos (1,318 pounds) of cocaine in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Guatemala, and captured five alleged drug traffickers, informed Guatemalan army spokesman Erick Escobedo, on September 18. So far this year, the Guatemalan security forces have confiscated about 3,600 kilos (7,936 pounds) of cocaine, while in 2001 the amount was of 4,119 kilos (9,080 pounds). The military spokesman said that the operation carried out in open sea is part of Operation Martillo, executed jointly by the Guatemalan and American armies to fight drug trafficking in the region. Escobedo explained that the drug was in a boat used for catching sharks and intercepted during the night on September 17. According to the authorities, three of the five detainees are of Guatemalan nationality, while the other two are Ecuadorians. These individuals were immediately extradited to the United States and will be facing charges on drug trafficking. last_img read more

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PR Insight: Optimize social media efforts at your credit union

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr In today’s mobile-first environment, it’s no longer optional for credit unions to use social media to facilitate and maintain solid member relationships–it’s a necessity. According to PEW Research Center, 74 percent of American adults now use social networking sites, and that number is only projected to grow.Sharing relevant blogs, press releases, bylines and announcements through social media is an excellent way to connect with members and prompt them to engage in credit union news and activities. However, it’s not enough for credit unions to simply set up a few social media accounts and call it a day. Instead, for a credit union to build a valuable social media presence, the financial institution must understand how to meaningfully employ these social channels.Here are some tips on best social media practices for credit unions.1. Not all social media channels are created equal.Just because a post might be a good fit for one social network, doesn’t mean it works for every social network. It’s important to learn the differentiators and nuances for each separate channel so your posts are relevant and resonate with target audiences. continue reading »last_img read more

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The changing perception of banking marijuana related businesses

first_imgWhen the federal government issued policy guidance in 2014 as to how financial institutions (FIs) could permissibly service marijuana-related businesses (MRBs), industry reaction was swift and decisive – most FIs wanted nothing to do with the reputational risks associated with marijuana.  Fast-forward three years and we are beginning to see a noticeable change in the perception of banking MRBs.   With the ever growing acceptance of legalized marijuana, MRBs are increasingly viewed by FIs as opportunities to be pursued, not risks to be avoided.  Moreover, federal and state officials see FIs as the key to getting marijuana proceeds off the streets and into the financial system where they can be tracked and taxed.  In short, the image of marijuana banking is changing.  Let us begin by separating reputational risk into two categories:  Reputational risk caused by the action (or inactions) of FI’s themselves, and the reputational risk associated with servicing clients considered to be controversial, such as MRB’s.  Reputational risk is commonly defined as the following:  “The potential that negative publicity regarding an institution’s business practices, whether true or not, will cause a decline in the customer base, costly litigation or revenue reductions.”  Certain byproducts of an institution’s direct actions or inactions can be defined.  This can be demonstrated by the $185 million dollars levied against a large institution last year for fraudulently opening accounts without their customer’s consent.  Another example would be civil money penalties for an institution’s failure to comply with various regulations.  Other examples would be negative publicity from data security breaches in an FI’s computer system, formal enforcement actions, and accounting irregularities.  Matters such as these are typically public information, with media exposure at various levels.  The airlines have been in the news recently for demonstrating less than exemplary customer service.  Despite large-scale press and social media calls for boycotts, I have yet to see the public threatening to locate and boycott the financial institutions servicing those airlines.  Or consider individuals that have conducted violent crimes, or crimes against children.  Are financial institutions obtaining lists to screen their clients so as not to be providing services to those individuals due to potential reputational risks?  If you like or dislike a particular political party, does where they bank influence your personal banking decisions?Let us now discuss banking MRB’s.  I recently conducted a Google search of the six known FIs servicing MRB’s in the state of Washington for any negative stories based on their association with marijuana.  The research results primarily consisted of articles containing profitable earnings and various employee promotions; there was not a single negative story about serving MRBs.Twenty-nine states have legalized marijuana in some form.  Recent surveys have indicated that 80% of Americans think marijuana should be legal for medical use, and 49% approve of its use for recreational purposes.  It is not only public opinion that has been changing but that of financial institutions as well.  While the reputation of the financial services industry continues to suffer from the financial crisis, the fact is that most credit unions take seriously their role in their communities.  And what they understand is the potential harm that could befall those communities if the marijuana industry remains unbanked.  Many financial institutions believe it is their civic duty to bring this money in-house where it can be accounted for, monitored, and taxed, and not left on the streets wreaking havoc on communities.Bringing financial services to MRB’s brings a number of desirable benefits, such as strict scrutiny and compliance to federal policy and state laws, BSA / AML oversight, and the ability to fully collect taxes on MRB’s.  Credit unions that are responsible banking MRB’s are removing cash from the streets and bringing legitimacy and transparency to an industry previously relegated to the financial shadows.   Perhaps the time has come to recognize that it is the FI’s serving MRB’s that are providing a valuable community service, as opposed to those that do not.If you have any questions, please email Hypur executives directly [email protected] and [email protected]ur.com. 70SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Andre Herrera Andre’s broad experience in payment system and banking technology management spans over 22 years and includes the management of complex, large-scale conversions, migrations and new product implementations. He also … Web: hypur.com Detailslast_img read more

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We’re a cooperative, so why is it so hard to cooperate?

first_img 38SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Denise Wymore Denise started her credit union career over 30 years ago as a Teller for Pacific NW Federal Credit Union in Portland, Oregon. She moved up and around the org. chart … Web: www.nacuso.org Details This year I will celebrate my 38th year in credit unions. The year I began my career as a teller at Pacific NW FCU in Portland, Oregon Jimmy Carter was the president. The Consumer Checking Account Equity Act had just been passed allowing credit union members to access their share balances by writing drafts on their accounts. Mortgage rates were at their all time high of 17% in an attempt for the Federal Reserve to wage a war on inflation. NACUSO hadn’t been formed yet. Every State still had their own trade association. Mergers were unheard of. There was no such thing as a smart phone, or mobile banking or P2P payments. It all revolved around the branch, cash for P2P payments and the good old US Postal Service. Life was pretty simple. One of the many reasons I love working with CUSO leaders – they have the cooperative heart combined with a shrewd business mind … A winning combination. For example, it’s 1989 and 15 big credit unions in California started toying with the idea of “sharing their branches.” What a cooperative and brilliant idea! One of the biggest expenses any credit union will encounter is the building of a new branch. If you’ve ever been involved with building a branch, or in charge of the task, it’s daunting to say the least.  Once the branch is built, hiring and training the staff and the ongoing operational costs can be a big challenge as well. Building and operating the branch is often a huge operational distraction and significant risk. Using “other” branches, or sharing branches, seemed like a no-brainer. Having conveniently located shared branches certainly would have been a wonderful differentiator for the credit union movement. So why was it not immediately and widely adopted? The early arguments against it were:I don’t want those credit unions to “steal” my members. Okay – then just wait a few years and they’ll “merge” your members in.I don’t want to clog our teller lines with other members. And as branch usage continues to decline, you’ll wish you had more traffic – and the kind that gives you fee income like a shared branch does.I get so frustrated when I hear a credit union professional say “Members don’t care that we are a cooperative and most people don’t know the difference between a credit union and a bank.”  We need to own that. In my opinion we’ve not given them a compelling reason TO care. Can you imagine if every single brick and mortar branch in the US was open to every credit union member in the US?  The banks wouldn’t have had the huge competitive advantage of nationwide branch networks!  To CO-OP’s credit, with shared branching they have finally surpassed the big banks in number of US branches. But still the perception is we aren’t “convenient.”  What if we had a national symbol for Credit Unions that was as recognizable as say the Red Cross logo, or Mastercard logo. So if you see that logo, you know you’re welcome and you understand it’s a better way of banking because it’s a financial cooperative. There is a new “movement” afloat that I believe has the potential for a real differentiator. It’s a CUSO, of course, called CU Ledger and the technology they are testing is Blockchain based. I know just enough about Blockchain technology to know it’s a smarter, safer way to guard member data, with significantly lower costs for participating credit unions. The massive Equifax data breach showed us that the game is over. We HAVE to find a better way to protect our member’s identity. I learned the phrase “honey pot” at a recent meeting. That’s how data is currently stored. All the data is in one big pot (i.e. location) with a “large fence” around it. That makes it too tempting and apparently too easy for hackers to gain access. Which is why you hear almost daily about data breaches. Nothing is sacred, even Arby’s got breached. CU Ledger’s challenge is two-fold: first they need credit union investors who understand and believe in this technology. And second, they need credit unions to participate on a large enough scale and soon enough that we can show the public that we are a better, safer solution to banking. Why is it so hard for us to work together? Here are just a few reasons that come to mind. Ego. Some executives see cooperation as a weakness or an admission that they can’t go it alone. Bankers that come into the industry and don’t know or care we are a cooperativeConfusion – let’s face it, sometimes we’re just plain lazy and if something seems too complicated we’ll pretend we’re not interested when in fact we just don’t understand.Not enough time – most credit unions feel the pressure to be full service, so a CU with 70 employees is doing the same level of service that 300 employees do at a much bigger shop.Not a priority . See number 4If you have a cooperative heart, and mind for business, come hang out with the cool kids at the 2018 NACUSO Network Conference in Anaheim, California on April 16th – 19th at the historic Disneyland Hotel.  You’ll learn more about the real opportunities to differentiate credit unions, provide better service at lower costs and competitive solutions to online lenders.  Come and talk with innovative industry leaders, learn about how you can collaborate and strengthen your credit union’s future … you’ll be glad you did.  last_img read more

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BSA, AML, and your credit union

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Robert McGarvey A blogger and speaker, Robert McGarvey is a longtime journalist who has covered credit unions extensively, notably for Credit Union Times as well as the New York Times and TheStreet, … Web: www.mcgarvey.net Details Ask a senior credit union executive what’s new at his/her institution in regard to anti money laundering (AML), Patriot Act, and Bank Secrecy Act initiatives and the reality is that you will have a longer and friendlier conversation if you asked about his/her last colonoscopy.Yes, it’s that bad.And that’s despite the reality that a credit union can be shut down if it grievously botches its BSA and AML analysis.Buckle up because in December 2016 FinCEN issued a press release where it announced a $500,000 fine against a credit union named Bethex in the Bronx.Bethex has assets of under $13 million.  They were folded into USALLIANCE, a Rye NY credit union. Bethex was no more.FinCEN outlined Bethex’s sins: “Since 2002, Bethex’s AML program maintained internal controls specific for low to moderate-income clientele within its designated field of membership in New York City. In 2011, Bethex began providing banking services to many wholesale, commercial money services businesses (MSBs). Many of these MSBs were located in high-risk jurisdictions outside New York and engaged in high-risk activity, including wiring millions of dollars per month to countries at risk for money laundering. When Bethex began to service these MSBs, it did not take steps to update its AML programs. As a result, Bethex was unable to adequately monitor, detect, and report suspicious activity or mitigate the associated risks, leaving the credit union particularly vulnerable to money laundering. “Among other violations, Bethex failed to timely detect and report suspicious activity to FinCEN and did not file any Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) from 2008 through 2011. In 2013, as a result of a mandated review of previous transactions, it late-filed 28 SARs. The majority of the suspicious activity involved high-volume, large amount transfers outside of Bethex’s expected customer base by MSBs capable of exploiting Bethex’s AML weaknesses. Most of those SARs were inadequate and contained short, vague narratives encompassing a broad summary of multiple and unrelated instances of suspicious activity. For example, one SAR covered over $906 million in total aggregate of suspicious transactions, but provided little information useful to law enforcement investigators.”In 2015, North Dade – a small Florida credit union – was effectively put out of business because of AML and BSA violations.  Face this reality: the big banks have big teams in place to handle BSA, AML, etc. They also have invested – heavily in many cases – in automation that takes a lot of the heavy lifting out of compliance. Machines do the work.Credit unions – especially the vast majority with assets under $1 billion – generally have not invested in automation for compliance. “There are case management systems that are good. They can be expensive for a small FI.  A lot of bigger banks are using robotics to get screenshots of bank statements and so on – an analyst doesn’t have to spend an hour collecting it. Only the biggest banks are doing this,” said Alma Angotti, managing director in the Global Investigations & Compliance practice of management consulting firm Navigant Consulting, Inc.Another issue that many small financial institutions now face: “Many employees in compliance are burning out,” said John Podvin, a Dallas lawyer well known in BSA circles.  He added: “There are people in BSA who are asking themselves, do I want to be second guessed all the time. Some are leaving the field.”A reality in BSA/AML is that the easier course is to file an SAR (suspicious activity report – this documents flags an action for possible investigation by law enforcement). Do that and a financial institution probably has satisfied its regulators. “There is no downside to filing,” said Angotti.Where the credit union may find itself in a pothole is when it does not file a SAR. In that case the credit union needs to justify why it did not file – and an examiner may well challenge the credit union.And that means many more hours get invested in explaining and justifying decisions.  Said Podvin: “There are increasing expectations from examiners – that’s the biggest problem now. It’s one thing for a big bank with a staff of several hundred working in compliance. It’s different for a community bank.”Or credit union.A result is that slender compliance staffs may be worn down in many small credit unions.Another barrier at credit unions: there may be “competition for scarce IT resources,” said Angotti. Doing BSA/AML research is computer intensive and, at least at smaller institutions, there may be a battle for resources and ask yourself this: who will win if the fight is between marketing, which needs IT resources to power a new campaign that may bring in lots of new members, and compliance which wants to research possibly suspicious activity by members?It’s a fight that compliance usually does noes not win.Don’t expect BSA/AML workloads to magically lighten.  Possible light at this tunnel’s end, said Podvin, is a federal effort to streamline some BSA/AML compliance.  He pointed to pending legislation, HR 6068, as offering hope to financial institutions. The aim of the bill, in its own words, is to “reduce regulatory burdens, and ensure that the information provided is of a ‘high degree of usefulness’ to law enforcement.”Meantime, good advice for top credit union management is keep your ear to the ground and ask – and ask again- your BSA and AML teams what issues are they facing and what resources they need to do their jobs better and smarter.  No credit union CEO wants to increase the budget for compliance work.But no credit union CEO wants his/her institution to go the way of Bethex.That makes the choice easier.last_img read more

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If your brand isn’t resonating, check your culture

first_imgTo build an authentic brand, you need an authentic culture. It is quite straightforward. If your employees do not believe what your organization says it is about, your brand will be inconsistent. Most people work for a paycheck, and that is a perfectly valid reason for someone to choose a place of employment. But organizations perform better when employees believe in the work they are doing. No one is authentic when following someone they do not believe, and no one interacts authentically with members and stakeholders when they do not buy into what an organization says it is about. Most of us do a decent job of faking it at work when necessary because we want to pay the bills. This does not mean employees will be providing bad service if they do not believe in your business model; but it may not be the best service. Engaged employees are more innovative and more interested. Attitudes translate in member facing interactions. Even the behind the scenes work can affect the member experience in a way that can negatively or positively impact a brand. A slow or inaccurate back office provides an inconsistent member experience. Your credit union may be able do just fine with a basic brand. But consumers come back to brands that resonate with them. Financial institutions offer commodities, so in an increasingly competitive environment, it makes sense to try to stand out. Social media has opened up a world of social responsibility. Community consciousness has become particularly important to the younger generations that will be the future of the industry. Members now care more about what goes on behind the scenes than they did in the past, because they have more access to that information. Authenticity means what you are trying to say about yourself in your marketing matches the decisions made in the board room and your employee experience. A brand is the reputation of an organization. A brand is what people say, think, or feel about an organization. Sometimes we reduce the brand to the components that make up a visual identity.  For example, we associate a brand with its logo and color scheme. But your brand is not simply aesthetics. Your brand is the intangible associations that your member’s mind conjures up when they hear your name or see your logo. Brand names are fascinating. Pause to think of the names of your favorite companies and try to dissociate the name from what you know about the product, logo, or service. You begin to realize the words without the associated meanings and brand implications are meaningless and strange. An organization’s name, logo, color schemes, and marketing collateral are empty until they are filled with concepts, consistency and reputation. We like our favorite companies because we have come to expect a certain level of quality and consistency from their product or service. The visuals just become the identifier. Marketing is a tactic; it uses words and images to communicate the message of what the organization represents. Marketing supports, but does not create your brand. A brand that resonates with members is the one that is consistent with your credit union’s internal vision and values. In order for members to believe in your brand, your vision and values need to be lived out in organizational decisions. The heart and soul of your credit union’s decisions, internal interactions and operations are your brand. Projects that don’t align with the reason you exist should be dumped, no matter what other financial institutions in your market or elsewhere are doing to stay competitive. Programs cannot make up for values that are not lived out in leadership. And whatever else you communicate externally will be inconsistent. If your decisions are built around something other than your mission and values, those decisions are really your brand. If your strategic plan is aimless, that is your brand. If you tolerate internal inequities, that is your brand. If you prioritize enforcing policy over problem solving for members, that is your brand. Consistent messaging starts from the inside and works its way outward. Inconsistent messaging is bland, not believable. And if your brand is not resonating, that may be why. 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Sarah Marshall Sarah Marshall is a consultant in the credit union industry, and can be reached for partnership and speaking opportunities through Your Credit Union Partner. Her background in community development includes … Web: https://yourcupartner.org Detailslast_img read more

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