Briefing

first_img Comments are closed. A round-up of news from the professional journals Resistance to registerNursing regulators are making a last-ditch attempt to resistGovernment demands for a publicly available list revealing which cities orregions nurses work in. The Nursing and Midwifery Council has been told it mustpublish a list of who is on the register and where they are from. This hadprompted fears that a ‘stalker’s charter’ would result, with members of thepublic able to look up nurses’ names and addresses on the internet or in alibrary.Nursing Standard, 13 May‘Racially biased’ NHSThe NHS is ‘chronically and consistently racially biased’ andis preventing black and ethnic minority nurses from being promoted, it has beenalleged. Trevor Phillips, chair of the Commission for Racial Equality (CRE),called the situation a clear case of ‘snow-capping’ – where white members ofstaff are at the top of the organisational pyramid and black workers at thebottom.Nursing Standard, 13 MayCancer linked to obesityObesity is a risk factor for cancer as well as cardio-vascularand other diseases, new research has suggested. A report in the New EnglandJournal of Medicine found that obesity could be linked to up to a fifth of allcancer- related deaths in the US. The prospective study over 16 years of nearly1 million men and women found a correlation between a high body mass index andcancer risk.Nursing Times, 24 April BriefingOn 1 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Sinopec continues international growth, begins oil depot operations at Sri Lanka’s Hambantota Port

first_img Sinopec begins oil depot operations at Sri Lanka’s Hambantota Port. (Credit: SINOPEC) China Petroleum & Chemical Corporation (“Sinopec”), China’s leading energy and chemical company, officially commenced operations at its newly established oil depot at Hambantota Port in Sri Lanka, successfully refueling its first ship on April 7. Impacting primarily Northeast Africa and South Asia’s oil market, Sinopec’s Hambantota Port oil depot will enhance its comprehensive bunkering service capabilities, as a significant boost in its continued effort to expand its bunkering activity around the world.Located on the southern tip of Sri Lanka, Hambantota Port is only ten nautical miles from the central Indian Ocean sea lane and is therefore of prime geographical importance. More than 1/2 of the world’s container freight takes this route, as does 1/3 of bulk shipments and 2/3 of oil shipments. Given its strategic location, Hambantota Port has emerged as a key port on the Belt and Road. In 2019, Sinopec Fuel Oil obtained rights for oil trading and operations as well as oil depot maintenance through global bidding and subsequently registered a wholly-owned subsidiary in Sri Lanka.As the COVID-19 outbreak intensifies around the world and fuel consumption drops, Sinopec has been committed to implementing epidemic control measures and resuming work and production, heeding the Chinese government’s call to maintain stable foreign trade by expanding its overseas bunkering business. Prior to the start of the oil depot’s operations, Sinopec Fuel Oil overcame the adverse impact unleashed by the outbreak by quickly adopting cloud office solutions. During this time, domestic experts provided remote support to inspect, approve, and jumpstart operations, enabling the port to successfully realize the first refueling mission at the new oil depot.Sinopec Fuel Oil is the fuel oil and bunkering arm of Sinopec Group. With the vision to build a world-class integrated bunkering services provider and clean energy supplier, Sinopec’s current fuel supply capacity covers more than 40 key ports domestically and overseas, supplying oil to more than 10,000 ships annually around the world. Source: Company Press Release Located on the southern tip of Sri Lanka, Hambantota Port is only ten nautical miles from the central Indian Ocean sea lanelast_img read more

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International students tour Royal Navy ships

first_img Authorities View post tag: Royal Navy International defense students tour Royal Navy ships Royal Navy warships in Plymouth hosted some 270 international students from the UK’s military leadership college for an insight into the professionalism of the senior service.A two-day dynamic demonstration of the Royal Navy’s capability was staged off the South West coast by warships HMS Dragon (Portsmouth destroyer), HMS Sutherland (Plymouth frigate), HMS Mersey (River Class patrol) and HMS Hurworth (mine hunter) and helicopters.The ships enacted a combat operation including maritime power in the skies on the sea and underwater.The event also showed off the Navy’s multi-roles in the docks with 1 Assault Group Royal Marines taking students aboard their landing crafts on the river and HMS Bulwark.The Royal Navy’s Southern Diving Group rehearsed their diving and ordnance disposal expertise.Students toured submarine HMS Triumph for an insight into this unique sphere of operations. Other skills on show were the hydrological and meteorological section with underwater unmanned survey craft.Commander Paul Ottewell, of the Defence College, Shrivenham, said: “This has been a highly successful two days for future senior commanders both in the UK and international military from 50 countries.”Countries represented included China, US, Australia, Malaysia, Kuwait, South Korea and Albania. Back to overview,Home naval-today International defense students tour Royal Navy ships March 15, 2017 Share this articlelast_img read more

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Gove scraps EMA bursary scheme

first_imgThe government will withdraw almost £400 million of support to students by installing a new bursary scheme in place of Labour’s Educational Maintenance Allowance (EMA), according to proposals for the next academic year.Home Secretary Michael Gove announced on Monday that the new scheme will guarantee regular payments amounting to £1,200 a year to approximately 12,000 16-19 year olds who are currently in care, have just left care or whose parents are on income support.Whereas the original EMA scheme had allocated £560 million, the incumbent government’s plans will only allocate £180 million directly to students.The remaining funds will be given to schools which will then have the responsibility of handing out financial support to students that they feel have what Gove described as “genuine financial barriers” to staying in education.According to NUS Vice President Shane Chowen “Those who will receive automatic payments represent a tiny percentage of those eligible for EMA.“The majority of this reduced support fund will be available only on a discretionary basis, which means hundreds of thousands of young people will be applying to sixth forms and colleges not knowing what support they will receive.At a time when youth unemployment is so high those looking towards further education will be worried that they will be unable to make up the shortfall in funds through part-time work.Dan Tomlinson, a first-year Univ student who received EMA at school, said, “The coalition’s new policy is still lacking in detail. I’m worried for people just like me in Year 11 who may feel they won’t be able to afford sixth form or college.”Members of the ‘Save EMA’ campaign commented, “If Michael Gove thinks that he deserves credit after giving 70p extra a week to 12,000 of the poorest students while at the same time taking away £30 a week [from] many of their classmates whose finances are marginally better, then he really is delusional.”last_img read more

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UMF students broaden horizons in Tanzania

first_imgFARMINGTON – Students at the University of Maine at Farmington recently returned from a two week trip to Tanzania as part of the college’s initiative to inspire more global thinking.“We’re realizing that employers are increasingly looking for globally-minded applicants so we’re trying to teach them how to think beyond borders,” Director of Global Education Linda Beck said.Beck was the teacher for the travel course, which was credit-bearing for the students. The course not only had a focus of expanding cultural horizons, but introduced students to the fundamentals of eco-tourism and environmental activism. The group met with different non-profits to learn about the subjects, as well as follow up reading and discussion. The majority of the students even took a crash course in Swahili before departing for their trip.“One of the most exciting things about these courses is that they are truly life changing experiences for some of our students. For a lot of them it’s their first time out of Maine, or they’ve never had the opportunity to be on a plane before,” Beck said.The students not only had the chance to fly across the ocean, they got to hike a portion of Mount Kilimanjaro and search for the “big five” on safari. This particular group of students included a female UMF student who had grown up in Kenya but hadn’t returned for 20 years.“It was neat to be able to bring her back and gave the rest of the students insight they wouldn’t have normally had,” Beck said.Travel courses have taken UMF students all over the world thanks to the work of inspired professors and the Department of Global Education. In recent years the program has extended its offer to the wider Farmington community- offering carefully designed trips to the public to countries like Italy, Germany and China. Community trips are not credit-bearing but do offer the same crash courses in language before the trip is scheduled. Beck said they hope to include a crash course in travel photography as well.The department will hold its annual International Bazaar this fall, selling arts, crafts and other goods from their trips. Money raised goes directly to a Travel Course scholarship in an attempt to make the program affordable to any student interested.last_img read more

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Fr. Ted stressed academic integrity in athletics

first_imgPhoto courtesy of University Archives Sixty years ago, well before the advent of ESPN, conference realignment and a playoff, the college football system faced many of the same questions it does today regarding the role of student-athletes in university life, the balance between academics and athletics and the need for institutional integrity in the face of big-time college sports.Sixty years ago, a university president just two years into his job wrote an article for a fledgling sports magazine addressing such college football-related issues.The president was Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, the magazine was Sports Illustrated, and the views Hesburgh set forth would come to define his and Notre Dame’s view of intercollegiate athletics for the next three decades of his term and beyond.In the Sept. 27, 1954, issue of Sports Illustrated — the seventh ever produced for the magazine that now has more than three million subscribers and was the first to feature a college football player on its cover — Hesburgh, who had recently started his term as Notre Dame president in June 1952, penned an article titled “The True Spirit of Notre Dame.”In it, Hesburgh espoused his views on intercollegiate athletics as a so-called “spectator” of the game, rather than as an expert. Early in the piece, Hesburgh made clear that administrators at Notre Dame are “in favor of intercollegiate athletics,” though with a few caveats.“I must add that we favor intercollegiate athletics within their proper dimensions,” Hesburgh said in the Sports Illustrated article. “It goes without saying that the proper dimensions should be those of university life and purposes.”To understand these dimensions, one must understand that college and professional athletics differ because college athletes must be students above all, Hesburgh wrote.According to Hesburgh, colleges can emphasize the role of the student-athlete by not admitting any student incapable of doing collegiate work, requiring athletes to follow the same academic requirements as other students, taking “no fresh-air courses” and giving athletes the same treatment in campus life matters as they would for other students.Hesburgh then set forth a framework governing how Notre Dame selects and treats its student-athletes. He noted that entrance requirements for athletes are the same as they are for everyone else at Notre Dame and that “many excellent athletes are not admitted because of their high school deficiencies.”Tommy Hawkins, who played basketball for the Irish from 1956 to 1959, said the admissions criteria for the University was particularly stringent, focusing on even more than grades and athletic ability.“That was a very sensitive time because the athletes who were chosen for scholarships were hand-picked at that time,” Hawkins said. “Their families were investigated; they wanted to see that people came from good families.“It just wasn’t how good you were as an athlete. Nobody said this to me, but I got the feeling that you had to clear the deck on a lot of different levels before you were extended a four-year scholarship to Notre Dame.”Dave Casper, who played tight end for the Irish football team between 1971 and 1973, said athletes knew of Hesburgh’s standards for them from the start of their careers.“I know that [Hesburgh] thought it was important to have a great athletics program, just as it was important to have everything … everything should be of excellence,” Casper said.Once athletes were enrolled at Notre Dame, their major focus was not to simply win a monogram but also to receive a diploma, Hesburgh said. Athletes had to stay eligible in order to do both, which required them to have a 77 percent academic average at the time, even above Notre Dame’s then-passing mark of 70 percent.Gerry Faust, who coached the Irish football team from 1981 to 1985, said Hesburgh was very resolute in what he considered his top goal for the football team.“He and [former University executive vice president] Fr. [Edmund P.] Joyce both felt the most important thing was that the young men graduate,” Faust said. “If they didn’t graduate, then they’re not fulfilling what the University is all about, so therefore they never took anybody that couldn’t make it academically.”The final main tenant on which student-athlete life at Notre Dame was based, Hesburgh wrote, was that athletes should “live a normal collegiate life.” Living such a life required that athletes not be swayed by the promise of illegal deals or recruiting benefits and that the University display integrity in all aspects, doling out the same punishments to athletes that they would to any other student.Gene Corrigan, who served as Notre Dame’s athletic director from 1981 to 1987, said adherence to NCAA and University rules was something Hesburgh emphasized from his first moment on the job.“He said to me one time, on one of my first meetings with him, ‘Do you know all the rules of the NCAA?’” Corrigan said of Hesburgh. “I said, ‘Father, I don’t know them all, but I understand them.’ He then said, ‘I want to tell you something. If you or any of your people ever break those rules, you’re out of here by midnight, and I don’t talk to attorneys.’”Similarly, Hesburgh stressed Notre Dame’s role as an integrity leader in the 1980s, an era when college football was beginning to grow into the billion-dollar business it is today, Corrigan said.“He felt like we had to be a leader as far as ethics were concerned, as far as doing things right, as far as graduating people, behaving themselves as athletes,” Corrigan said. “He did not want [athletes] to live together. He and Fr. Joyce were adamant that we would not have anything like an athletic dormitory.”Despite some of his hardline stances, Hesburgh had little involvement in the day-to-day affairs of Notre Dame’s sports teams, mainly leaving that responsibility to Joyce, who Hesburgh described as his “watchdog” in the 1954 Sports Illustrated article.“I would have lunch with Fr. Ted probably once a year, and we’d just talk about all things that had to do with intercollegiate athletics, what we were doing, what’s going on in the whole country,” Corrigan said. “But that was never his interest.”While Joyce largely oversaw athletics, Hesburgh wouldn’t hesitate to intervene if he felt athletes weren’t living up to standards, Corrigan said.“He would get upset if there was a sport where the kids weren’t behaving,” Corrigan said. “That meant more to him. He liked to win, don’t get me wrong, but that wasn’t everything to him, not at all.”Hesburgh also took a special interest in ensuring some of Notre Dame’s early African-American athletes felt welcome, according to Hawkins. The former basketball player, who was one of just 10 African-American students when he arrived on campus, said Hesburgh personally welcomed him to Cavanaugh Hall at the start of his freshman year and continued to check in on him afterwards.“He always kept track of me and from time to time, I’d get a message to drop in and see him so he could see how I was doing or if there were things that were bothering me,” Hawkins said. “Amazingly enough, as busy as he was, he always took the time to say, ‘Hello’ and ‘How are you doing? Is everything okay?’”Hesburgh attended Notre Dame home sporting events, but rarely, if ever, went to away games, according to Corrigan. While Hesburgh wasn’t an overly vocal fan at games, he cared deep down about Notre Dame’s athletic performance, Faust said.“When we were on the road, he would invite my wife to watch games at WNDU-TV,” Faust said. “My wife said he would never show his emotions in public, but privately, he was rooting right and left all the time.”After his retirement as University president, Hesburgh took a role in influencing policy on the national college athletics landscape, serving as co-chairman of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics from 1990 to 2001. Hesburgh and co-chairman William C. Friday, president emeritus at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, oversaw a committee that released two reports, one in 1992 and one in 2001. The 1992 report called for stronger presidential leadership and academic and financial integrity in collegiate athletics, while the latter report set forth the academic standards that formed the basis for the NCAA’s Academic Progress Rate (APR).In 2004, Hesburgh received the NCAA’s Gerald R. Ford Award, which is presented to an individual who has provided leadership as an advocate for intercollegiate athletics over the course of his or her career.Hesburgh’s receipt of the award, which came a half-century after his Sports Illustrated article, represented the culmination of an approach to intercollegiate athletics that often deviated from the norm at the time.Hesburgh himself recognized the difference in his views compared to others, particularly when he wrote in Sports Illustrated of the criticism that came from his decision to bench a star basketball player for a game against Kentucky for having an average below 77 percent. After the Irish lost to Kentucky by one point in overtime without the suspended player, Hesburgh defended his approach with the following words:“At times like this, when the walls are falling in on an administrator, it is good to seek quiet courage in the epigram above a hero’s grave: ‘Death is not rare, nor is it of ultimate importance. Heroism is both.’”Tags: athletics, Remembering Father Hesburgh, student-athleteslast_img read more

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Lynn Nottage’s Sweat Will Bow on Broadway

first_img Related Shows Lynn Nottage’s Sweat, which is currently making its New York premiere off-Broadway at the Public Theater, is heading to the Great White Way. Directed by Kate Whoriskey, tickets are now available for the production, which will begin previews on March 4, 2017 and officially open on March 26 at Studio 54.No word yet on casting, but the current Big Apple incarnation of the show stars Tony nominee Johanna Day (Proof) as Tracey, Younger favorite Miriam Shor as Jessie, Carlo Alban (Tamburlain) as Oscar, James Colby (Patriot’s Day) as Stan, Khris Davis (The Royale) as Chris, John Earl Jelks (Holler If Ya Hear Me) as Brucie, Will Pullen (An American Daughter) as Jason, Lance Coadie Williams (Shows for Days) as Evan and Michelle Wilson (A Raisin in the Sun) as Cynthia.Sweat tells the story of a group of friends who have spent their lives sharing drinks, secrets and laughs while working together on the line of a factory floor. But when layoffs and picket lines begin to chip away at their trust, the friends find themselves pitted against each other in the hard fight to stay afloat.The production will feature scenic design by John Lee Beatty, costume design by Jennifer Moeller, lighting design by Peter Kaczorowski, projection design by Jeff Sugg and original music and sound design by Rob Milburn and Michael Bodeen.Sweat is scheduled to shutter at the Public on December 18. The play was co-commissioned by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and D.C.’s Arena Stage. The play received its world premiere at OSF in July 2015 and subsequently played an acclaimed run at Arena Stage in January 2016. John Earl Jelks & Michelle Wilson in ‘Sweat'(Photo: Joan Marcus) Sweatcenter_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on June 25, 2017last_img read more

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London Pulse increase focus on mental health of their athletes | Netball News

first_img– Advertisement – London Pulse's Lindsay Keable discusses the support she receives and why focusing on your mental health is so important as an athlete
London Pulse's Lindsay Keable discusses the support she receives and why focusing on your mental health is so important as an athlete

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Use of military medevac helicopter to harass US demonstrators probed

first_imgTopics : US defense officials said Wednesday they would investigate the use of a medical evacuation helicopter carrying red cross markings to harass and intimidate demonstrators in Washington.The helicopter hovered very low and directly above peaceful protestors Monday using its rotor wash to blow debris on them, a dangerous tactic used by the military in war situations to force people to disperse.The act itself was criticized, as well as the use of a medical helicopter bearing the international symbol of the Red Cross, which in wartime delineates non-combatant and neutral vehicles carrying injured persons and medical personnel. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Wednesday that he had ordered an inquiry into the helicopter, which was operated by the Washington DC National Guard, which is overseen by the Pentagon.Esper said he understood that the helicopter was not on a medical evacuation mission, and that its movements appeared to be “unsafe.””There are conflicting reports. I think we need to let the army conduct its inquiry and get back and see what the facts are,” he told reporters.Major General William J. Walker, commanding general of the National Guard for the US capital, said he had also ordered an immediate probe.center_img “I hold all members of the District of Columbia National Guard to the highest of standards,” he said.last_img read more

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Holy trinity of units among former churches selling for under $350K

first_img81 Wood Street, Depot Hill on the market for $265,000 has four bedrooms, one bathroom and a two car space garage. Picture: Realestate.com.auAt $265,000, is 81 Wood Street, Depot Hill, a large cathedral-like property with four bedrooms, one bathrooms and two car spaces.Kas Woch of Kas Woch Real Estate – Rockhampton was marketing the former Catholic Church as having undergone a “stunning conversion”.“Selling way below replacement cost with approximately 220sq m of living area plus an additional approximately 80sq m of covered outdoor areas, this is a well built residence with spectacular features that make it stand out from other homes.” 140 Feluga Road, Feluga, QLD. Picture: Realestate.com.auAll up there are six bedrooms, four bathrooms and garaging for three cars.Agent Dianne Wagner of First National Real Estate – Mission Beach said the converted church was a few minutes drive from the local pub and among features that have been retained are original stained glass windows.“The church was built in 1935 but became a hot spot for renters after a couple bought the property for just $35,000 in 1992. They proceeded to give what once was the old Saint Rita’s Roman Catholic Church the ultimate conversion.”According to Ms Wagner, two of the three two-bedroom units were currently rented out at $190 a week with the third rented at $170 a week, with a steady stream of tenants courtesy of banana and cane farms in the area. Each unit was air-conditioned with soaring ceilings, timber staircases and one unit has two bathrooms. 72 Mourilyan Road East Innisfail, on the market for $350,000, has three bedrooms, one bathroom and two car spaces. Picture: Realestate.com.auMore from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home6 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor6 hours agoThe most expensive former church on the market in Queensland right now is the three bedroom, one bathroom, two car space home at 72 Mourilyan Road, East Innisfail.Agent John Moyle of Ray White – Rural Innisfail has the listing at $350,000.“This former church has been substantially renovated and is set high on a hill in East Innisfail enjoying terrific views down the South Johnstone River and to Mt Bartle Frere.” “The choir loft was made into a master bedroom, the pulpit and main body of the church was now an “enormous” formal lounge and two large bedrooms, while the church hall was turned into a modern kitchen and open plan family zone. The former church even has its own chook run. 140 Feluga Road Feluga is a six bedroom, four bathroom, three car space former church which has been split into three units. It’s on the market for $335,000. Picture: Realestate.com.auTHIS may well be the holy trinity of apartment living – a trio of townhouses within a massive former Catholic Church – one of several on the market for under $350,000.The former Saint Rita’s Roman Catholic Church underwent “the ultimate conversion” being turning into a trinity of two bedroom units after it was sold to private buyers in the 1990s.The property at 140 Feluga Road, Feluga, is nine minutes from Tully, inland from Mission Beach in Queensland, and on the market for $335,000.center_img 4 Isabella Street, Mount Perry is a one bedroom, one bathroom, one car garage former church on the market for $95,000. Picture: Realestate.com.auThe lowest priced former church was at 4 Isabella Street, Mount Perry, for just $95,000. The one bedroom, one bathroom, single car space home is ripe for renovation with ample room for a mezzanine level in the double-height building. The property, which is just over half an hour from Gin Gin, inland from Bundaberg, was being marketed by Gin Gin Country Realty with some building materials like floor and wall tiles, timber blinds and feature timber doors. According to the agency, “Mt Perry is a lovely little village”.Among other churches on the market right now was 10 Tansey Street, Goomeri, for $165,000 negotiable – a one bedroom, one bathroom property right now which is being marketed via Buy My Place. The former Presbyterian Church was built in 1956 and renovated in 2011, according to the listing, and is located one hour west of Gympie. 18-20 Graham Street Koumala is for sale for $180,000 and has two bedrooms and one bathroom. Picture; Realestate.com.auAlso for sale is 18-20 Graham Street, Koumala – a three bedroom, one bathroom former parish hall on a 2,024sq m block that’s on the market at $139,000.Greg Brady of First National – Mackay Sarina Nebo was marketing the property as suitable for someone with a trade or DIY renovation skills. The home is 15 minutes south of Sarina on the Bruce Highway and has a powered shed with three lockable bays and a carport.last_img read more

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