Letters

first_imgThis week’s lettersLetter of the weekHR must practise what it preaches Well done to your correspondent for speaking out in “Agencies and HRcould care more”, (Letters, 5 June). Having been “deselected” just before Christmas as part of thePrudential’s restructuring that you featured, I found myself in a very similarposition – long experience in HR, the wrong side of my 40s and redundant. Although I was lucky enough to find a handful of agencies that were willingto put some effort into matching my skills against vacancies in theirdatabases, the vast majority of them were completely silent and even seemed toresent me phoning from time to time to check on progress. I was also on the receiving end of questions on how I felt about workingwith people younger than me and even suspicion because, at the age of 45, I wasnot an HR manager (my choice). The icing on the cake was answering questions about the O-level exams I took30 years ago. The delays your correspondent is experiencing are more cock up thanconspiracy. Nevertheless, HR simply does not practise what it preaches. Despite finewords on ageism, youth appears to be everything and stereotypical judgementsare still made about people based on how old they are. I even remember a recent front page story in your journal about younghigh-fliers, which came out at the height of my own job search. There should be more mature people in HR. We might then feel our experienceis genuinely valued and we still have a chance of finding work in our chosenfield. I cannot see that happening, and the solution for me was to broaden mysearch. Despite my qualifications and track record, I left HR behind and movedinto a new field. Curiously, within three weeks of doing that, I was offered anexternal HR role. Des Farthing Via e-mail Recruitment must rip up rule book The sentiments expressed in “Agencies and HR could care more”reflect a widespread problem in the recruitment industry. I have seen this fromboth sides – as an HR professional and as a candidate – and have been bitterlydisappointed by the performance of a number of agencies. As an HR professional, I was fed up with receiving speculative CVs fromagencies on the off chance, and others that in no way reflected the briefprovided. Agencies had rarely met the candidates, so exactly how much work had theyput in for their 25 per cent commission? Then a colleague told me that an ex-employee of a well-known agency told herthat she had been encouraged to present as many CVs as possible – the more theclient gets, the more chance that they will recruit one of them. This delusion led me to develop a totally different approach to recruitment.We don’t use databases or CVs, we tailor everything to the vacancy, and wefocus on future ability, rather than historic technical competence. However, part of the problem lies in the way candidates apply for jobs. Iwant to know candidates really want the job – not just any job, but that particularjob. HR professionals complain about skills shortages – so stop doing things theway you’ve always done them, stop relying on computer process-driven agenciesand get radical. And candidates: stop doing the same thing. Do your homework, don’t just copyeveryone else. Recruitment needs a revolution, but until HR professionals, recruiters andcandidates rip up the rule books, we will continue to see skills shortages,poor service and discrimination. Chantal Walton Director HR on Tap, Cambridge There’s two sides to age bias story I have been out of work for a lengthy period in the past and share theconcerns about discrimination on the basis of age. I was, therefore, dismayed to read towards the end of the letter that thewriter did “not feel secure in putting my future in the hands of veryyoung staff.” Oops. Jon Friend Senior personnel manager The UK still won’t budge an inch I am 45 years old and was educated using the metric system. How old will I be before the UK finally adopts metrication? Your news headline, “Labouring under a ton of new legalpractices”, (News, 5 June) should read, “Labouring under a tonne ofnew legal practices” Mark Beaumont Senior loss prevention manager BOC Distribution Services Comments are closed. LettersOn 19 Jun 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Read More →

Scoreboard roundup — 8/30/20

first_imgAugust 31, 2020 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 8/30/20 Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStockBy ABC News(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Sunday’s sports events:MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLINTERLEAGUENY Yankees 8, NY Mets 7NY Yankees 5 NY Mets 2Tampa Bay 12, Miami 7St. Louis 7, Cleveland 2Boston 9, Washington 5LA Dodgers 7, Texas 2AMERICAN LEAGUEDetroit 3, Minnesota 2Chi White Sox 5, Kansas City 2Toronto 6, Baltimore 5Seattle 2, LA Angels 1Oakland at Houston (Postponed)NATIONAL LEAGUEChi Cubs 10, Cincinnati 1Pittsburgh 5, Milwaukee 1San Diego 13, Colorado 2San Francisco 4, Arizona 1Atlanta 12, Philadelphia 10NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PLAYOFFSBoston 112, Toronto 94 (Boston leads 1-0)LA Clippers 111, Dallas 97 (LA wins 4-2)Denver 119, Utah 107 (Series ties 3-3)NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE PLAYOFFSDallas 5, Colorado 4 (Dallas leads 3-1)NY Islanders 3, Philadelphia 2 (NY leads 3-1)Vegas 3, Vancouver 3 (Vegas leads 3-1)WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONConnecticut 76, Washington 63Phoenix 83, Minnesota 79Los Angeles 84, Atlanta 79MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCERNashville 1, Miami 0Seattle 3, Los Angeles FC 1FC Dallas at San Jose (Canceled)LA Galaxy at New York City FC (Canceled)Orlando City at Philadelphia (Canceled)New York at Atlanta (Canceled)Los Angeles FC at Portland (Canceled)Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

Read More →

Agency buys up lettings rival despite ‘most challenging times’ following tenant fees ban

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Agency buys up lettings rival despite ‘most challenging times’ following tenant fees ban previous nextAgencies & PeopleAgency buys up lettings rival despite ‘most challenging times’ following tenant fees banPortsmouth firm Bernards recently opened a fourth branch and has now acquired The Flat Agency including its management portfolio, two directors and one member of staff.Nigel Lewis7th January 20200805 Views Consolidation within the lettings industry continues following the news that a leading estate agency in Portsmouth has acquired a competitor, including its portfolio of managed properties.Four-branch Bernards has bought Queens Street based estate agency The Flat Agency which specialises in managing new-build apartments within the area.This includes within the city’s huge residential developments such as Gunwharf Quays and Admiralty Quarter but also at other locations in neighbouring Southsea.The acquisition of Bernards, which opened its fourth branch focussing on student lets late last year, will give the company a further foothold in the city’s lettings market.The managing director of Bernards, Daniel Byrne (left), says the acquisition has taken place despite one of the ‘most challenging’ years within the property sector.The owners of The Flat Agency, which was established in 2006, are Gary Penney and Andy Peters who will now relocated to Bernards newest office along with their office manager, Harley McBridge.“I am delighted that our bid to create a formal partnership with this established and well-reputed local lettings business has been successful,” says Byrne.“Bernards performed superbly in 2019. Even though the market is going through a period of uncertainty due to Brexit and the recent tenant fees ban, we’re enjoying an exceptionally busy period in both our lettings and sales divisions.“I decided to team up with The Flat Agency to support our growing business and to strengthen our already established brand in a market.”Bernards was co-founded in 1998 by Jason Parker (left), who is leading figure in the local business sector and also owns a restaurant and boutique hotel in the city.berndards Jason Parker Daniel Byrne lettings Portsmouth January 7, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Read More →

Upgraded underwater warfare suites for Halifax frigates

first_imgThe Canadian government has awarded General Dynamics Misssion Systems a CAD186 million contract for upgrades and maintenance of underwater sensors on Royal Canadian Navy’s Halifax-class frigates.The majority of this work will occur in Canada, creating and maintaining about 120 highly skilled jobs while supporting the continued growth of the underwater sensor industrial capabilities in Canada, the government said in an announcement.The upgrades will allow the frigates to detect quieter targets at increased ranges. In addition, improved automation will allow sonar operators to improve their underwater warfare performance work and to focus on other priorities.“Threat detection is critical to initiate rapid defense countermeasures that protect our sailors and our ships. As the security environment continues to evolve, we will continue to adapt our naval capabilities, enabling effective defence of Canadian waters and meaningful contribution to international operations and exercises,” said Harjit S. Sajjan, Canadian Minister of National Defence.Halifax-class frigate sonar operators detect, locate and track surface and sub-surface threats through the continuous monitoring and collection of information via high-tech sensors.The $186 million contracts include acquisition and upgrade for the first six Halifax-class frigates ($103 million) and in-service support (potentially $83 million).The contracts include options to upgrade all twelve Halifax-class frigates, which would bring the acquisition portion of to $170 million.The in-service support contract will maintain and sustain upgraded suites for up to 23 years, if all options are exercised.The first installation of the upgraded underwater warfare suite is expected to be completed in 2021 and operational in 2022. View post tag: UWSU View post tag: HMCS Fredericton View post tag: GDMS View post tag: Royal Canadian Navy Photo: Royal Canadian Navy photo of Halifax-class frigate HMCS Fredericton Share this articlelast_img read more

Read More →

Emma Rodriguez Crowned Queen Infanta

first_imgSisters Shannon, and Kendall Donnelly, 1, of Egg Harbor Township, were crowd pleasers in Ocean City’s Baby Parade in 2018. In a tradition dating back to 1929, Ocean City has chosen a Queen Infanta to preside over the annual Baby Parade in August. Emma Rodriguez, a senior at Ocean City High School, was crowned 2019 Queen Infanta in a ceremony Tuesday at the Ocean City Music Pier. Queen Infanta candidates are judged on their school and community involvement. The Baby Parade will take place for the 110th time at 5 p.m. Aug. 11 on the Ocean City Boardwalk.The parade is open to all families with children age 10 or younger. For more information on how to participate, visit ocnj.us/babyparade. Online registration is now open. Queen Infanta 2018 Grace Bromhead, a graduate of Ocean City High School and student at Liberty University, with newly crowned Queen Infanta 2019 Emma Rodriguez, a senior at Ocean City High School. (Photo courtesy City of Ocean City)last_img read more

Read More →

Members Of Tedeschi Trucks Band To Perform As “Whose Hat Is This?” In NYC

first_img[“Thanks to guest vocalist Jeff Taylor for the inspired artwork”] On a night off during Tedeschi Trucks Band’s 2015 Europe tour, fellow bandmates Tim Lefebvre (bass), Kebbi Williams (sax), JJ Johnson (drums), and Tyler “Falcon” Greenwell (drums) convened at the intimate A-Trane in Berlin for a special one-off evening of improvised music. The audio from this special evening made it onto a special recording, dubbed Whose Hat Is This? The record documents this historic night with selected tracks from the group’s electrifying set of free jazz and fearless exploration, and you can listen to it here.With Tedeschi Trucks Band’s residency at the Beacon Theatre starting this week in New York City, the players have scheduled a pair of Whose Hat Is This? shows at the 55 Bar. Tonight and tomorrow, Whose Hat Is This? will perform two sets of improv at the small venue at 10PM with vocalist Jeff Taylor. On Thursday, vocalist Jason Lindner will join the scene. Seating will be extremely limited at the shows, so come early and be prepared for some deep space musical exploration. More information can be found here.Listen to a selection from Whose Hat Is This? below:last_img read more

Read More →

EU urges US to draft joint rule book to rein in tech giants

first_imgBRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union is urging U.S. President Joe Biden to help draw up a common rule book to rein in the power of big tech companies like Facebook and Twitter and combat the spread of fake news. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said in a speech to the Davos World Economic Forum on Tuesday that the way online platforms are doing business impacts on “our democracies, our security and on the quality of our information.” Meanwhile. Hungary’s justice minister says her government wants to place restrictions on tech giants that she said arbitrarily silence users of online platforms, including by suspending the accounts of government leaders like former U.S. President Donald Trump.last_img

Read More →

Trail Mix – Bill & The Belles

first_imgEver wonder what was on the radio when Dr. Brown went hurtling across the space/time continuum in the Back To The Future movies?It might have been tunes from Bill & The Belles.This Johnson City quartet writes and performs music that is, most definitely, a sonic trip through time. Drawing inspiration from music that spans decades before now, it doesn’t seem unlikely that you would find a Bill & The Belles track on a dusty Victrola 78, filed away with sides cut by artists like Jimmie Rodgers, The Carter Family, and Charley Patton in a vintage cabinet record player.Kris Truelson, singer and guitarist for the band, is a student of old music, working as the producer for WBCM/Radio Bristol, the flagship radio station headquartered at the Birthplace of Country Music in Bristol, Virginia. Joining him in the band Kalia Yeagle on fiddle, Grace Van’t Hof on banjo, and Karl Zerfas on bass.In a region heavily populated with bands who turn their ears backward in time for musical inspiration – bluegrass and old-time are staples in the mountains of Southwest Virginia and Northeast Tennessee – Bill & The Bells have cultivated a singular status. There is no other band out there better at rekindling the sound, and the interest in it, of that early 20th-century Appalachian band. Their ability to rejuvenate the sounds of years gone by has landed them the role as house band for Farm & Fun Time, a monthly live performance radio show that originated in Bristol in the 1940s, and they have become featured performers at festivals across the country.I recently caught up with the whole band to chat about the new record, the musical history of Bristol, and what to check out if you make it to the Birthplace of Country Music Museum.BRO – What’s the secret to keeping the music you play fresh?B&TB – A lot of the music we’re inspired by has a timeless quality to it. The inspiration for our music spans about 150 years, so it sometimes feels funny to refer to when our music “comes from,” but the melodies and songs we pick are ones that we feel can be as relevant today as they were “back then.” Our new album, DreamSongs, Etc., features half original material, and that’s going to be a focus for us moving forward. The songs we’re introducing are brand new and maintain the same timelessness that originally shaped our band’s sound.BRO – Farm & Fun Time has become a staple at the Birthplace of Country Music. If you could bring back one guest from the program’s earliest days, who would it be and what song would you want to hear?B&TB – One of the coolest things about today’s Farm & Farm Time is the fact that we’ve been able to have so many living performers from back in the 1940s and 1950s on board. Ralph Stanely, Jesse McReynolds, and a lot of other regional artists have been a part of the show, and we are honored to keep its legacy alive.BRO – Along the same lines, your favorite recording from the Bristol Sessions? One that makes you think, “Boy howdy, I’d like to have been there when they laid that down.”B&TB – Everything Alfred Karnes laid down. We was one of the best, most powerful singers of the day. One of his songs was highly influetial for a track on our album, “Back To My Childhood Days.” Can you guess which one?BRO – We are featuring “Finger Pointin’ Mama” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song?B&TB – It’s a cheeky take on the classic relationship gone wrong song, about the frustration of dealing with people you don’t want to deal with. A little funny, a little cathartic, a little nasty. It’s a much needed reminder to be honest with yourself and each other.BRO – Best reason to visit the Birthplace of Country Music Museum?B&TB – You’ll find us there the second Thursday of every month for Farm & Fun Time! We’re the house band and Kris is the host, and he’s put a whole lot of work into this show over the last few years. We’re proud of what it’s accomplished and are glad to be a part of a monthly celebration of our region. The Birthplace of Country Music also puts on the Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion, a festival we look forward to every year and has come to feel like a home for our band.You can catch Bill & The Belles this week in Nashville and Knoxville.The August Farm & Fun Time was last week, but if you are in the Bristol area for Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion, you can catch all the fun that weekend.For more information on Bill & The Belles, upcoming shows, and the brand new record, please check out their website.And be sure to take a listen to “Finger Pointin’ Mama,” along with new tunes from Hot Rize, Chicago Farmer, The Devil Makes Three, and many more, on this month’s Trail Mix.last_img read more

Read More →

US Prepares to Help France in Mali

first_imgBy Dialogo January 17, 2013 Pentagon officials say the United States is preparing to offer logistical support to France as it continues to carry out air strikes against Islamist militants in northern Mali. The Pentagon has already begun to assist French forces with intelligence to help push back the militants’ advances, but the U.S. is warning against action that may bring further chaos to the region. French fighter jets have been carrying out air strikes around the clock, hitting training camps and other positions held by Islamist rebels in the north of the vast West African country. Pentagon officials said last week that they are close to finalizing a decision on what type of logistical support to offer France for Mali. Officials said the U.S. is already providing intelligence gathered by unmanned aerial vehicles operating in the region. Speaking on a flight to Europe, U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta commended France for taking the lead in the fight to rid North and West Africa of militants including al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb group. “We have a responsibility to make sure that al-Qaida does not establish a base for operations in North Africa and Mali. We’ve been very concerned about AQIM and their efforts to establish a very strong base in that area,” he said. Panetta said he promised to help France, but said that support will be limited. “It’s basically kind of in three areas that we’re looking at. One is to obviously provide limited logistical support. Two is to provide intelligence support. And three, to provide some airlift capability as well,” he said. Analysts say there is a reason for Washington not to push for a more direct role in the conflict. Thomas Dempsey is a retired U.S. Army colonel who works with the Defense Department’s Africa Center for Strategic Studies. “We need to be careful, in a well-intentioned desire to counter violent extremists, that we do not fan the flames of civil conflict in northern Mali, that we don’t encourage local groups to take up arms against each other, and that we don’t make the violence worse,” he said. The U.S. aim is to go after al-Qaida-linked militants in Africa. In keeping with President Obama’s new defense strategy, it wants to do so without direct intervention, focusing instead on training the militaries of allied partner nations. France’s immediate goals are to push back the militants’ advance in order to allow African peacekeepers to move in and start securing northern Mali for an eventual return to government control. But after last year’s military coup, there is no functional, legitimate government in place to retake control. And there is no long-term plan in place, which Dempsey says makes it difficult for the United States to offer more direct assistance. “You need to know where you want to end up before you start. I’m not convinced that everyone involved here has a clear picture of where you want to end up,” he said. The French intervention has come at the request of Mali’s interim leaders. Next will be the task of replacing those leaders with a legitimate and stable government that is able to take control of the north. Before that happens, analysts say Mali will have to resolve political problems that include long-simmering grievances of Tuareg separatists whose rebellion last year led to the coup and the Islamists’ takeover of the north.last_img read more

Read More →

Delivering an integrated member experience just got easier

first_img continue reading » As technology evolves at breakneck speed, Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) have become a powerful tool for integrating information, processes, and technology across an enterprise. A 2019 study by Cloud Elements found that 55 percent of business owners believe API integration is critical to their business strategy.1APIs have been largely responsible for the growth of the modern digital economy with Big Tech companies like Amazon, Facebook and Uber all relying on them to power their business and create seamless digital experiences. For credit unions, APIs can help drive deeper member engagement within their payments channels by enabling them to introduce new innovations faster and more seamlessly than ever before.What is an API?As a quick refresher: an API is essentially code that makes it easier for two systems or applications to relay information to one another. We use APIs every day when we’re booking flights, buying movie tickets, or checking the weather on our phone – they are the connective tissue that allow products, services and applications to interact without having to create duplicate code. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Read More →