Ateneo recovers, dumps UP to open 2nd round

first_imgPhivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAteneo got back on track after putting down University of the Philippines, 83-66, in the second round of the UAAP Season 81 men’s basketball tournament Sunday at Mall of Asia Arena.The Blue Eagles lost 88-85 to Far Eastern University in their final game of the first round but their win against the Fighting Maroons pushed them back atop the standings with a 6-2 record.ADVERTISEMENT View comments LATEST STORIES UP, meanwhile slipped to sixth with a 3-5 slate.From a slim 56-50 lead early in the fourth, Ateneo blew the game wide open in the latter minutes taking a 70-58 lead after Angelo Kouame’s dunk with 4:16 left in the game. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissThirdy Ravena then drove the stake down UP’s hear further when he soared for his own hammer for the Blue Eagles’ 75-60 lead with 1:56 to play.“It’s important for us to come out strong especially in the second round and especially we’re coming off a loss against FEU,” said Ateneo assistant coach Sandy Arespacochaga. “We wanted to come into this game and focus on UP.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal “It was more than just the standings, we wanted to come out and play well. We wanted to focus our intensity and we didn’t want to go down.”Ravena put up a season-high 21 points, grabbed 11 rebounds and blocked two shots for the defending champions while Tyler Tio added 12 points and five assists.Raffy Verano had10 points and seven rebounds for Ateneo while Jolo Mendoza also had 10 points in just nine minutes for the Blue Eagles.Bright Akuhetie led UP with 20 points and eight rebounds while Paul Desiderio added 16 points and seven boards.Injuries have already plagued Ateneo prior to the game against the Fighting Maroons with twins Mike and Matt Nieto nursing health problems but the Blue Eagles again suffered another mishap on the court late in the second quarter.ADVERTISEMENT ‘Tough’ Huang emerges as key cog for Ayo’s Tigers Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Shooting guard Adrian Wong lost a tooth after diving for a loose ball but Arespacochaga managed to make light of the situation and things will be fixed for the backup wingman. Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown MOST READlast_img read more

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Huskies and Vipers to meet tonight at North Peace Arena

first_imgThe Huskies come into the game with a two point lead on the Vipers, and winner of two of their last three games. Sexsmith meanwhile is in a bit of a skid as they’ve lost five games in a row.Tonight’s game will be the last home game until the new year.The next game for the Huskies will be on Saturday in Grande Prairie.- Advertisement –last_img

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Group of families fighting power line between Dawson Creek and Chetwynd

first_imgThey also argue others are being offered buyouts that are far below current values for farmland in the area.Linda Smashnuk, who for 40 years has lived with her husband Layne on an 11 hectare land parcel in the area in question, has reportedly stated she and her neighbours do not feel they have been treated fairly. The story also attributes to her a statement that nine families in the area have talked to a lawyer about a possible class action lawsuit but going to court is only a last resort.Meantime, Hydro Transmission Group Vice President Bruce Barrett claims the project is going ahead, but only after lengthy public consultation. He adds Hydro makes offers based on professional appraisals, and strives to get to a deal that works for both sides.- Advertisement -That noted, he says deals have already been struck for the right of way on 75 of the 101 private land parcels on the route. He also says, “As is usual, with a long project like this, you will find that a few property owners either have different views than we do or feel that what they’re being offered is unfair, but we believe that we are being very fair and transparent.”To read the full Globe and Mail article, click here.last_img read more

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Morata denies Pochettino’s Kane claim

first_img0Shares0000Chelsea’s Alvaro Morata was forced to sit out the visit to Everton on December 23, 2014 while he served a one-match suspensionLONDON, United Kingdom, Dec 30 – Alvaro Morata has rejected claims by Tottenham Hotspur boss Mauricio Pochettino that he didn’t move to the club because he would have been in competition with Harry Kane.The Spanish hit-man has 12 goals in 25 games in his first season for Chelsea. But far from saying he didn’t want to play second-fiddle to Kane, at Spurs, Morata said a deal wasn’t possible with the north London side, before moving to the Blues from Real Madrid for £70m.Pochettino said in August: “Morata talked about myself, in the media he said ‘Mauricio called me’. That was two years ago or more. He said to me: ‘Why do you want me if you have Harry Kane?’”But Morata has since denied that, saying: “No it’s not true. I spoke with him and he said he wanted both [of us] to play together, but there was no chance to come to Tottenham.“For sure I would like to play with Kane, he’s a big player, one of the best strikers in the world, but in this moment when I spoke with him (Pochettino) there was no chance to leave Real Madrid.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Exclusive – Newcastle legend’s gloomy verdict: ‘It’s a long hard season ahead’

first_imgNewcastle legend Alan Shearer believes the club are in for a “long hard season” and stopped short of backing beleaguered boss Alan Pardew.The Magpies have yet to win a Premier League game in seven attempts this season and are 18th in the table, prompting many despondent fans to call for the manager to be sacked.Unpopular owner Mike Ashley has thus far resisted the clamour to swing the axe, but all-time leading goalscorer Shearer believes results must improve immediately, starting with a first league victory when Leicester visit St James’ Park on Saturday.Asked by Drivetime whether he thinks it is time for a change in the dugout, Newcastle’s record goalscorer said: “If you speak to anyone in football, they would never ever ask for anyone to lose their job or be sacked.“But we all know that football is a results business and Newcastle haven’t had enough results since January.“It doesn’t help that you’re constantly selling your best players over the last few years. It can’t keep happening that you hope to survive by selling your best and then buying cheaper players in. It doesn’t work like that unfortunately.“It might work for a year or two but in the end something has to break. I hope it doesn’t but I do fear it’s going to be a long hard season for Newcastle.”Unlike previous transfer windows Newcastle brought in a host of new players over the summer, however, many have failed to fire and Shearer believes it is time they up their game.“At the minute they’re there [in the relegation zone] because they deserve to be there. They haven’t defended well enough, they haven’t scored enough goals and that’s a recipe for disaster when that happens.“Can they score goals? Of course they can, if they can get Papiss Cisse fit. My concern is that and also they’re shipping too many goals. Confidence is not high at the moment, the players who performed so well up until January have to start performing again and the players they’ve brought in, too.“To be fair to Mike Ashley he has spent money this summer unlike other transfer windows. He’s spent something like £40million, so the players he’s brought in also have to start performing.”last_img read more

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Moyes didn’t realise Man United’s size, claims Ferguson

first_img1 David Moyes and Sir Alex Ferguson David Moyes did not realise the size of Manchester United when he took over as manager.That’s the view of Sir Alex Ferguson, the man he replaced in the Old Trafford hotseat in 2013.Moyes ended a relatively successful spell at Everton but endured a torrid time as the Red Devils missed out on European football and was sacked in April this year.Ferguson had departed United after 26 years that included winning two European Cups and left Moyes with a squad that had just won the Premier League title.And in excerpts of his updated autobiography which were published by the Guardian, the former Scotland boss defended the players he left behind and claimed Moyes did not fully realise what he was taking on.He wrote: “He hadn’t realised just how big United is as a club.”He added: “Chelsea started the current season as favourites for the title, with a squad that also had six players in their 30s. I don’t hear any grumbles about the age of their group.”In the immediate aftermath of Moyes’ appointment at Old Trafford, it was widely suggested that Ferguson had hand-picked his successor but the 72-year-old was at pains to point out that was not the case, and that it was a club decision.“There appears to be an accepted view out there that there was no process. Nonsense,” he wrote.“We feel we did everything the right way: quietly, thoroughly, professionally.”Ferguson also questioned Moyes’ decision to clear out the backroom staff at United, such as Ferguson’s long-time assistant Mike Phelan, and bring in his own people.“Maybe David felt that at such a massive club he had to be sure that all corners were covered in terms of his support system. I felt that network was already there, with plenty of great people already in important slots,” he added.Ferguson claimed Moyes’ United played at a slow tempo which ran counter to the philosophy which had brought Ferguson so much success.“The reason for playing at speed was that United players had been accustomed to operating that way,” he said.“If the tempo slowed for any reason, I would be into them at half-time. ‘This is not us,’ I would say. Playing with speed never hindered our results. It was our way: energy and determination in the last third of the pitch.”The pressure on Moyes reached its peak as it became more clear that United would seriously struggle to make the Champions League.Ferguson revealed he felt “the walls squeezing in” on the new man, which reminded him of his own early struggles at United in the late 1980s prior to the glory years which followed over the next two decades.“As the results deteriorated, each defeat was a hammer blow to him,” Ferguson recalled.“I could see that in his demeanour. In January we bought Juan Mata and that gave everyone a lift but I could see the walls squeezing in, leaving David with less and less room to breathe. I know that feeling from 1989, when we went through a terrible spell.“You feel you are being crushed. The results gnawed away at David. Nobody could dispute how disappointing the season was. And it cost a man his job.”last_img read more

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Juventus chief confirms Liverpool interest in midfielder but rules out move

first_img1 Juventus chief executive Giuseppe Marotta has confirmed the club rejected an offer from Liverpool for Claudio Marchisio.The 29-year-old midfielder, who has played for the Turin club for his entire career, has been linked with a move to Anfield to work under new Reds boss Jurgen Klopp.Marotta has now conceded that he has received an approach from the Premier League side, as well other clubs across Europe, for the Italy international.But he insists the Bianconeri have no desire to sell Marchisio, who only signed a new five-year contract in July.“We get so many offers for our players, but we are used to buying – not selling,” Marotta told Premium Sport shortly before Juve’s 0-0 Serie A draw at Inter Milan on Sunday evening.“We have renewed with him, our focus is strong and I think Claudio’s first thought is to finish his career here. Not only Liverpool, we have received several offers.” Claudio Marchisio last_img read more

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DONEGAL TEENAGER SELECTED TO REPRESENT IRELAND AT FOOTBALL FOR ALL WORLD CUP IN MEXICO

first_imgPackie Bonner making a presentation to James Boyle who’s been selected to represent Ireland at the Football for all World cup in Mexico.Packie talks to James about that save at Italia 90.A Donegal teenager has been selected to represent Ireland at the Football for all World Cup in Mexico next year. James Boyle, 17, is from Saltpans in Dungloe and is a fifth year student at the Rosses Community School.He found out earlier this week that he’d been selected to represent Ireland at the World Cup in Mexico.James comes from a family steeped in sporting tradition, and despite being an amputee that hasn’t stopped this remarkable young man from making his impact on the game he loves.As a young child James was cruelly forced to have his leg amputated, however he’s a supremely gifted player and is noted for his physical strength. He’s a huge Arsenal fan, and is absolutely over the moon to have been selected on the Ireland team to play at the World Cup.James will now join Shay Given and Packie Bonner as a select band of Donegal men to play at a World Cup.Former Celtic FC and Republic of Ireland goalkeeping legend Packie Bonner was the special guest at a presentation made to James on behalf of all the staff and students at the RCS who are very proud of his outstanding achievements.Packie knows all about representing his country at a World Cup so we’re sure his advice was well heeded by James.Well done to James on his wonderful achievement and we wish him all the best in Mexico.  DONEGAL TEENAGER SELECTED TO REPRESENT IRELAND AT FOOTBALL FOR ALL WORLD CUP IN MEXICO was last modified: November 15th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:home-page featuresIrelandjames boyleMexiconewsPackie BonnerRCSSportWORLD CUPlast_img read more

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Heat is on Time Warner

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) – Carl Icahn, the billionaire investor, stepped up his campaign for changes at Time Warner Inc. Tuesday, issuing a letter to shareholders accusing the company’s executives of mismanagement and demanding new shareholder representation on the board. Icahn has already urged the company to step up its share buyback program from $5 billion to $20 billion as a way to lift the company’s sluggish stock price. He also wants the company to completely spin off its cable TV division, instead of only the 16 percent stake that Time Warner currently plans to spin off. In his letter to shareholders, Icahn also accused the company of getting poor prices on two previous deals, one to sell off Warner Music Group last year and the sale of its 50 percent stake in Comedy Central to Viacom Inc. Icahn also repeated his criticism of Time Warner’s decision in early 2000 to be acquired by America Online Inc. at the height of the Internet bubble, which led to a 75 percent decline in the company’s value over two years. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Far from New Orleans

first_img “The similarities lie in the differences. It’s the most exciting part of being here,” he said. “I love that people are proud of where they came from.” He remembers when on one of his first days at the school, someone came up to him and said, “I bet you’ve never seen a Persian before.” “And he was right, I hadn’t,” he said, smiling. James, who comes from a performing arts school once attended by jazz trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, left Louisiana before the storm hit with about four changes of clothes, his own trumpet and a handful of CDs – accidentally leaving behind one by one of his favorite artists, Clifford Brown. “That was a big mistake.” But for all his love of New Orleans, its flavor, its music, the 17-year-old said it’s time to move on. “I just do everything by faith and live day by day. I don’t dwell on the past,” James said. “When God takes something from you, he blesses you with a lot more than he took. I live in Los Angeles, I live in a nice house, I have food, I have all the basic necessities, so why should I look back? It happened for a reason.” Even James’ new friends are taken aback by his self-assuredness and easy transition into Los Angeles life. “I think he’s one of the most respectful friends I have. He succeeds at school and with friends,” said 16-year-old friend Adir Bar-Noy. “It takes a lot of guts to go from New Orleans to here and be normal, just cool. If I would do that, I’d be nervous, but he’s just fine. He’s brave.” The primary concern for schools that accept students from other locations is transition difficulties, said psychologist Caren Caty, who counsels at Gledhill Elementary, where three of the Gentry kids attend school. Students, especially younger ones, need guidance to help them through the transition, she said. “It’s almost like culture shock. Adjustment and adaptation are the things we work on to help bring about a sense of stability,” Caty said. Donte Gentry’s older brother Joshua said he misses everything about his home, especially his school band, in which he played the trumpet. His current school doesn’t have a band. There are amusement parks and basketball games at local parks, but what the kids miss is grandma’s gumbo and church on Sunday, mom Monique Gentry said. Now all six Gentrys are usually in their hotel room by 4:30 p.m., where a video game and board games keep them occupied through the evening. Sharing a room – four sleep on the two queen beds, one on the floor and one in an armchair – where each has to fight for space to do homework, there is little the family can be excited about except for the fact that they’re alive and closer to each other after the whole tragedy. “I prefer living in New Orleans,” said 12-year-old Joshua. “It’s a better place for me. I can see my family more and I miss playing the trumpet. When I think back about how I used to live, it’s a whole lot different. I have dreams that I’m back there and everything is beautiful.” Most of the evacuees the Los Angeles Unified School District has accommodated did not experience the hurricane, floating bodies and the horrific shelters, so they’ve adjusted well to their new classrooms, with help from district counseling and tutoring services, officials said. “They’re displaced, but they haven’t lost anybody. They’ve lost their roots, but not their families,” Butterworth said. “It’s hard to leave your roots, but it’s much easier when you have your intact families with you.” Part of the success of students’ transition to Los Angeles could be the small group of displaced victims, Butterworth said. The presence of Katrina victims was not intrusive and made it easier for them to blend in to the schools and receive personalized attention from administrators and teachers. In Texas, where more than 100,000 children were evacuated, there’s a great deal of resentment against those who have come into the school district and tensions between the two groups are flaring up, said Dr. Marlene Wong, director of crisis counseling and intervention services at LAUSD, who visited the state’s schools. Here, it’s been so easy to blend in that James Darby had not met Darrion Weems, another of Katrina’s kids on Taft’s campus, until they were brought together by a reporter for an interview. Darrion, 17, moved to Los Angeles less than a week after Katrina slammed into New Orleans and adjusted to the school quickly, largely because he’s surrounded by his family, but also because he was able to continue playing football. He has made fast friends among his teammates as they played through the season and into the city section semifinals. The high school junior pulls A’s and B’s in every class except for Algebra II, and he’s positioning himself to get a college football scholarship. “Everybody here greeted me with open arms. It wasn’t that bad,” he said. “It helps to have a group of people who are your friends and are there for you, and my family’s all here,” he said. “You can’t dwell on the past. You’ll die thinking about it. You gotta keep moving.” Caty, the school psychologist, cautions that it could take up to a year before the trauma of being uprooted hits Katrina’s kids, especially the younger ones. In the meantime, teachers and tutors are helping students catch up on work that is often more academically rigorous than they had in New Orleans schools, which are historically among the nation’s poorest-performing schools. Teachers in Los Angeles monitor the students for grade-level performance and to determine what resources are needed to help, said Betsy Garvin, the younger Gentrys’ principal at Gledhill. Monique Gentry said there was plenty of room to grow in the kids’ first report cards, which came earlier this month. But the school is providing after-school tutoring to bring the kids up to speed. For James Darby, the young jazz enthusiast, his future lies in his new home. He boasted a 3.5 grade-point average at the rigorous performing arts school he attended in Louisiana, but his grades slipped while attending three schools in three states since the beginning of the school year. He promises he’ll get back on top of his grades: “I still have an A-student mentality.” But for the Gentry family, its future is back in New Orleans – back home – once the federal subsidies for their hotel run out in January. “Everybody we’ve met says they want to go back. That’s where we called home, where I lived 17 years,” Monique Gentry said. “That’s where I belong.” Naush Boghossian, (818) 713-3722 naush.boghossian@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Donte Gentry is stuck between the world he knew and loved and the one that has embraced him in the wake of the nation’s biggest natural disaster. One of 250 “Katrina Kids” who arrived in the Los Angeles school system in the weeks after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, the 11-year-old and his family have set up a household here in Los Angeles. But it’s not really their home. “I miss all the food: the crawfish, crabs, shrimp, all the seafood,” said Donte, a fifth-grader at North Hills’ Gledhill Elementary School, ticking off what he misses most about his hometown. His sister chimed in with two obvious omissions: red beans and andouille sausage. “All we have here are tacos and burritos.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans Aug. 29 as a Category 5 storm, one of the most powerful to hit the U.S. mainland since records have been kept. In the aftermath, hundreds of thousands fled the coastal city, most to Texas and Mississippi, but thousands of others scattered across the country, including several hundred who ended up in Los Angeles, mostly because they had family here. The struggle for many of these children has generally been one of getting used to a city that is a far cry from their Southern home. “The transition is not so much the trauma of leaving as it’s the trauma of acceptance, of arriving and of how you’re received,” said Robert R. Butterworth, a Los Angeles psychologist who specializes in trauma. “They’re psychological refugees – they’re missing the food, the climate, the friends, the way people interact.” James Darby IV, a 17-year-old senior at Taft High School in Woodland Hills, has immersed himself in the sea of differences. He shares eagerly a Hebrew word an Israeli friend taught him: achi, meaning brother. “We always say, `Hello, achi!’ when we see each other,” James said, unable to contain his excitement at knowing the word. last_img
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