This New Local Furniture Collection Is Surprisingly Affordable

first_imgHome Design This New Local Furniture Collection Is Surprisingly Affordable Called Zon3, the line—offered exclusively at Zimman’s, in Lynn—includes sofas, art, fabrics, and more. Sign up for Home & Property newsletters. Design, real estate, and pretty things for living.* By Rachel Kashdan· 62164 Photo by Kim FurnaldAttention, Zimman’s shoppers: The Lynn-based fabrics-and-furnishings store has just introduced a brand-new collection. Called Zon3, the 110-year-old shop’s new line includes attractive-yet-affordable pieces showcased on the store’s newly-revamped third floor. “What we wanted to do was create a department where people could get the same taste level and style that they’re used to at Zimman’s but at a very different price point,” says Patty Forster, the store’s operations manager.The collection offers vinyl floor cloths, one-of-a-kind pieces (many of which are vintage), and American-made upholstered furniture featuring high-performance Crypton fabrics—all at significantly lower prices than the wares on the shop’s lower floors. That means you can score a sofa for less than $1,600, or an upholstered headboard with bed rails for $1,400, Forester says. Zon3’s focus on value doesn’t mean it skimps on style, though: It’s a curated collection of clean-lined pieces. Sofas, for instance, come in three customizable forms: a traditional design with rolled arms, a tufted midcentury-modern model, and a transitional velvet piece. “Most furniture businesses have over 100 sofas you can choose from and all tend to sell the same styles over and over,” Forester explains. “What I did was edit everything that was available to make the choice very simple for customers.”Photo by Kim FurnaldWith the release of Zon3 also came an entirely new look for the third floor of the shop, a previously unassuming space that housed sale merchandise. Now it flaunts a fresh coat of paint, new floors, and new window treatments. “We’ve always had a third floor but never had such a fabulous use for it,” Forester says. “I had a vendor come in yesterday who’d been coming here for 20 years, and he couldn’t believe what it looked like.” To mark the release of Zon3 and show off the floor’s brand-new look, the store will also be hosting a celebration every Saturday in February with music, craft beer from local breweries, and light snacks.80 Market St., Lynn, 781-598-9432, zimmans.comcenter_img Print Sign up for our weekly home and property newsletter, featuring homes for sale, neighborhood happenings, and more. 1/30/2019, 5:19 p.m. last_img read more

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Harvard Is Investigating Questions about Fencing Coachs House Sale

first_img By Spencer Buell· Education Harvard Is Investigating Questions about Fencing Coach’s House Sale So was it bribery? An “independent review” is underway. Sign up for Boston Daily. News. Commentary. Every day.* Print Get a compelling long read and must-have lifestyle tips in your inbox every Sunday morning — great with coffee! center_img 33136 Entrance gate and East facade of Sever Hall at Harvard Yard | Photo via Getty Images/Roman BabakinWhen the college admissions scandal broke last month, in which wealthy parents were accused of paying bribes to get their kids into elite colleges with help from coaches and fraudulent test-takers, Harvard stayed largely out of the conversation, as the university was not named in the allegations. But a new case brought to light by a bombshell report in the Boston Globe has thrust the storied university into its spotlight, and may offer another look at how the children of the wealthy get a leg-up at top schools.The Globe‘s investigation, released Thursday, takes a close look at a curious real estate deal involving Harvard’s head fencing coach, Peter Brand, and Jie Zhao, a businessman whose son was later admitted to Harvard and joined its fencing team. According to the report, in 2016, Brand sold his modest Needham home to Zhao for about a million dollars—a generous sum that the Globe‘s reporting suggests was hundreds of thousands of dollars above the home’s actual value. Which, naturally, has raised some questions about what might have motivated Zhao to pay such a price (he later sold the home at a more than $300,000 loss). The report also raised questions about some other donations to nonprofits. Zhao, whose older son is also on the Harvard fencing team, insists the sale and donations were legitimate and unrelated to his younger son’s college prospects.A college admission, in four acts:1) Harvard fencing coach tries selling his house for $549K2) Maryland businessman buys it for $1M3) Businessman’s son gets into Harvard, on fencing team4) Businessman then sells house at $325,000 losshttps://t.co/kDfqKvdzzt via @jm_bos— Matt Stout (@MattPStout) April 4, 2019Harvard is now conducting an “independent review” of the situation, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Claudine Gay wrote in a statement released Thursday. Gay stressed that while it takes the allegations seriously, the university does not believe the situation is “related in any way to the ‘Operation Varsity Blues’ scheme.”But it does seem pretty fishy, a fact that Zhou himself apparently acknowledged in interviews. So did the coach’s relationship with the athlete’s family amount to bribery? We may soon find out. 4/5/2019, 12:32 p.m. last_img read more

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